New Zealand Alpine Flora

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Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

The day was still young when we reached the car so off we went for a look up the Ball Pass road .You can only get part of the way before washouts make foot travel the only option.
Steve and Doug and view down the valley.
Raoulia australis in bloom along the way.

Interesting access to gain a view of the Tasman Glacier.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Booker
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Wonderful stuff, Dave ... I can almost smell the liniment from here!!!  Looks an exhausting, but profitable hike!!  I too have just one small plant of R. godleyanus that I have potted up today. I will compare the foliage to both your images and let you know. R. insignis is in bud at the moment (seven or eight plants), but other buttercups are still resting.
Regards to you all.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Dave and David, I second Cliff's declaration "wonderful stuff", certainly some rough terrain there, thanks for bringing the experience to us on NARGS Forum. Love the netted leaves on Ranunculus godleyanus.
 
I had no idea that Gentianella saxosa was a coastal plant, growing among sea shells!  Is it always a lowland plant?

Myosotis uniflora is heavenly!  How fascinating, and perhaps vexing too when trying to put names to things, that there are so many undescribed Myosotis species in the NZ mountains.

Trond, the image link to Myosotis 'Hokonui' still doesn't work here, tried it on two computers, in both Firefox 9.x and Internet Explorer 9.x, gives error: "Not Found,  the requested URL /hokpines/myohok.jpg was not found on this server".  I suspect the image was removed but that your browser might have it cached. If others in North America can try the original link above and let us know if it works or not, I would appreciate it.

Stuart Murray has since sent me the image, and I post it here to overcome any difficulties with the link. It's a really nice mat-forming Myosotis.

Myosotis 'Hokonui', courtesy of Stuart Murray:

By the way, check out the 1-page list of New Zealand rock garden plants (many with image links), some very choice items there.
Hokonui Alpines Plant Catalogue
New Zealand Alpines and Rock Garden Plants
http://users.actrix.co.nz/hokpines/catalogue-3.html#1

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

Trond, the image link to Myosotis 'Hokonui' still doesn't work here, tried it on two computers, in both Firefox 9.x and Internet Explorer 9.x, gives error: "Not Found,  the requested URL /hokpines/myohok.jpg was not found on this server".  I suspect the image was removed but that your browser might have it cached. If others in North America can try the original link above and let us know if it works or not, I would appreciate it.

Doesn't work for me either using Safari on a Mac.

Wonderful scenes and plants!  Thank you for posting!  Those glacial lateral moraines look pretty recent (at least in geological terms)... was there much plant life growing there?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Very interesting list - when Graham Hutchins of County Park Nursery was collecting and distributing NZ plants, this was a wonderful source of plants in the UK and I remember growing a lot of the smaller choice hebes. They are the most intriguing and fascinating plants (all NZers) and the new book that has just been published a 'must have'.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Hello Lori,

When I was a student ( some time ago) you could drive to Ball Hut on the road built on lateral moraine that has now collapsed due to the Tasman Glacier retreating. The road was built on the moraine shelf and now the ice has gone (or lowered significantly in parts) the morainic debris just falls down into the void. There is now a big lake at the terminus of the Tasman Glacier and they take tourists out on it in boats. If you are (un)lucky and are close enough you can get a bit of a thrill when the ice collapses into the lake making a big wave. The collapsing moraine is very raw but it is rapidly colonised by a number of plants: nitrogen fixers Coriaria and Carmichaelia. Other species that are common are Muehlenbeckia axillaris, Stellaria gracilenta, Geranium brevicaule, Parahebe decora and various species of Epilobium.

I have located a photo taken in September last year that shows the moraines below the terminal lake of the Mueller Glacier at Mt Cook: it shows a series of moraines of different ages with the successional vegetation. Prominent in the foreground on an old stable moraine  ate Podocarpus nivalis, Griselinia littoralis and Aciphylla aurea.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Hoy wrote:

Mark, Maggi's link works perfect for me and has done so all the time.

Didn't work for me, but I subtracted the picture info and just went to the homepage- interesting site- I was esp interested to see they offer seeds, though currently the list is offline for updating..
http://users.actrix.co.nz/hokpines/

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

McDonough wrote:

Dave and David, I second Cliff's declaration "wonderful stuff"
 
I had no idea that Gentianella saxosa was a coastal plant, growing among sea shells!  Is it always a lowland plant

Thanks Mark and Cliff.

Yes G.saxosa is a lowland plant found around the southern coastal regions and i believe on Stewart Island .Habitat can be just above the high tide mark to sand dunes and rocky places.

Lori wrote:

Wonderful scenes and plants!  Thank you for posting!  Those glacial lateral moraines look pretty recent (at least in geological terms)... was there much plant life growing there?

Thanks Lori

David Lyttle has mentioned colonisers --others are the Raoulia's and in the Epilobium genus E.melanocaulon is prolific.I've sometimes thought that in it's best forms it might warrant cultivation in a pot with careful attention to removing seed heads. :-\ .I'd certainly not risk it in the garden proper here.

Travel up towards the Ball Pass area is what i call interesting as on your right side is the lateral moraine, however on your left side .close to hand ,is a steep mountain range from where frequent avalanches sweep down and across the defunct road and sometimes up the lower part of the moraine wall.

In fact last week the 3 of us were discussing the differences in the colour of the rock .Hopefully the following pic will show what i mean.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Trond, the image link to Myosotis 'Hokonui' still doesn't work here, tried it on two computers, in both Firefox 9.x and Internet Explorer 9.x, gives error: "Not Found,  the requested URL /hokpines/myohok.jpg was not found on this server".  I suspect the image was removed but that your browser might have it cached. If others in North America can try the original link above and let us know if it works or not, I would appreciate it.

Mark, you probably are right! I still have it on my computer but can't open it on others.

Dave & David, both plants and places are lovely!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Some great and interesting landscapes and plants, guys!
David L- all the Myosotis shown are lovely- the little annual is quite appealing, even if it needs macro to be so!
Dave- the Brachyglottis seems to have very nice foliage...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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