New Zealand Alpine Flora

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Steve Newall
Steve Newall's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

You're in a bad way Toolie .You might have Mates Syndrome . I would seek counselling and therapy before it's too late .

Thanks Lori . It will not be too long before you are out and about and I look forward to seeing where you have been

Have some seeds drying out for you Trond and will send them next week

Balclutha , New Zealand

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Despite not having as good weather as the S.P.A.T crew I found a couple of things on my trip to Eyre Creek;

We have an abundance of imported yellow dandelions but we also have an indigenous one that is fairly rare and this is the first time I have found it in flower

A rather nice whipcord hebe that was flowering. We have not managed to get a consensus for the name yet; it is not Hebe propinqua which is what I thought it was when I took the photo.The next name I came up with was Hebe annulata but it is not that either.

whipcord hebe

We found a patch of the little grass lily Herpolirion novae-zelandiae in flower

Herpolirion novae zelandiae

Last an orchid Gastrodia cunninghamii. It is not an alpine but was growing in beech( Nothofagus) forest on the valley floor.

Gastrodia cunninghamii

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

The Herpolirion novae-zelandiae is a delight to see.

What is the name of the indigenous dandelion, please, David?

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

That whipcord Hebe is a nice specimen, would love to have something like that in our garden! Sadly there are no whipcords in the nursery trade in Nova Scotia. The only Hebes I have been able to find are H. odora (sold as Hebe buxifolia), and H. pinguifolia var. pagei. Both are blanketed in snow at the moment, and in spite of winter temperatures dipping below -15 C at night, last month (and last winter as well), they seem to thrive here. I wonder which whipcord would have a reasonable chance at surviving here?

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

In this area of NE Scotland Hebe ochracea is pretty hardy -  particularly the variety 'James Stirling' - surviving when other whipcords and other types have suffered quite a lot.

If you can source a 'James Stirling' I'd certainly give it a try.

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Steve Newall wrote:

You're in a bad way Toolie .You might have Mates Syndrome . I would seek counselling and therapy before it's too late .

Thanks Lori . It will not be too long before you are out and about and I look forward to seeing where you have been

Have some seeds drying out for you Trond and will send them next week

Thanks, Steve, looking forward to that!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have one or two whipcords in my garden and you can find some in the trade here but I don't remember the names. Some are sold without a name too, just a sixpack of hebes!

Although the hebes usually survive they flower only sparingly, lack of sun I presume.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Maggi,

The name of the dandelion that I inadvertently omitted is Kirkianella novae-zealandiae.

Tingley,

If Hebe odora survives in Nova Scotia most whipcord species should survive there too as they are often found growing together. Both Hebe odora and Hebe pinguifolia are widespread species with a lot of genetic variation present. There is a great deal of variation in the whipcord species  hence the named cultivars which are clonally propagated variants. Until recently  this was segregated out as a number of different species but in the most recent treatment a number of these species have been lumped together. Hebes are easy to propagate from cuttings and the smaller ones are quite happy growing in pots.

Here is an example of Hebe odora

Hebe odora

and another species Hebe rakaiensis flowering particularly well

Hebe rakaiensis   Hebe rakaiensis flowers

Here is an example of Hebe hectorii with particularly robust branches and a second picture showing the variation present in this species

 

Hebe hectorii  Hebe hectorii variants The specimen (3) on the far right is what was  formerly known as Hebe subulata

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Thank you, David.    I'm slightly worried  that I'm  finding a dandelion attractive though, even if it does make a very nice rosette of foliage. - must be the effects of the cold weather addling my senses .

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

It is a strangely attractive plant for a dandelion; here is another picture showing the flower buds with their unusual bristly black hairs

Kirkianella novae-zelandiae

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

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