New Zealand Alpine Flora

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IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

A yet more interesting detail - thank you.

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

David, that Hebe rakaiensis is a beautiful specimen, and the Hebe hectorii variants are really fascinating! Many different Hebes were quite commonly seen in gardens when we lived in Vancouver BC. Of course at the time, there was no room in our postage stamp sized, light-challenged garden. Now that we have returned to the east coast of Canada, they are as rare as hen's teeth, so I am always on the lookout for seeds on the various seed exchanges... probably the most likely way I'll get my hands on more than the two already here.

Both Hebe odora and Hebe pinguifolia have handled some tough winters with ease. In 2012-13 we had very little snow cover, and temperatures bouncing all over the map - near zero C one day, then -16 C the following several days, then back above freezing. This winter has been colder, but with more snow cover protecting the plants from wind and extreme cold. Temperature fluctuations haven't been as extreme or as frequent. H. pinguifolia var pagei seems to be a bit more prone to browning off in exposed cold conditions, but it bounced back last summer to the point that no lasting damage could be detected by mid summer. Eventually I'll find a few more Hebes to add to the landscape, will keep rakaiensis, hectorii, and ochracea in mind.

Cheers,

Gordon

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Steve Newall wrote:

You're in a bad way Toolie .You might have Mates Syndrome . I would seek counselling and therapy before it's too late .

Spoke to the medical staff Steve and Mrs Toole says its terminal and there is no going back..........winkyes

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

David L wrote:

The name of the dandelion that I inadvertently omitted is Kirkianella novae-zealandia

Hello David

Nice detailed shots of Kirkianella novae-zelandiae..As you say it is quite attractive.

I thought there was only one native dandelion and that was Taraxacum magellanicum  ?.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Spent yesterday just down the coast from here with members of the Otago Botanical Society looking at plants on the Omaui peninsula.

In wet areas the small creeping Euphrasia repens .

 

Also a fruiting spike of Gunnera monoica,

 

another orange one ,this time Nertera balfouriana.Plants were everywhere so in places it was difficult to avoid stepping on them .

 

The sand dune community includes numerous cushions of Raoulia hookeri, the only mainland population of Gunnera hamiltonii ,(John having a close inspection), 

Close up of Raoulia and Gunnera,

and Geranium sessiliflorum var. arenarium.

 

 

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

 David Lyttle up high braving the wind.

On coastal turf close to the beach, the shore stonecrop ,Crassula moschata and close up . 

Highlight of the trip for me ,also on coastal turf, was a bank with Gentianella saxosa in full bloom.kiss    

Probably a common sight when a bunch of 'planty' folk  ,(a couple of botanists ,one or two enthusiasts ...) get together.laugh.

Mid afternoon we started to head back to our vehicles as the Otago people had a 3 hour journey home.View back over the shore.

Cheers Dave.
 

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

It was an interesting day. We saw a number of rare and unusual coastal plants and some that you would expect to find in the subalpine zone rather than on the coast.

Dave may not have mentioned it because he is a native of those parts; it was blowing really hard. Here is a picture of two hardy Southern men; Brian Rance our botanist and Dave Toole.

Brian Rance and Dave Toole at Omaui

A rock polished by wind-blown sand

Omaui ventefact

Coastal turf dominated by Gentianella saxosa in flower.

A coastal turf dominated by Gentianella saxosa

 

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I've mostly been lurking here, but really enjoying the plants, panoramas and people.  You New Zealanders have some of the coolest plants ever, and remarkable that even at the seashore there are choice treasures all about, plants one normally associates with alpine zones. I'm really taken with the ground-level foliage on Geranium sessiliflorum var. arenarium, and the mixed community of Raoulia hookeri with Gunnera hamiltonii.  Of course Nertera fruits and cushions of Gentianella saxosa aren't bad either.  Thanks for sharing your excursions.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

The Omaui/Three Sisters dune site is unique.  It has a number of rare species in particular Gunnera hamiltonii ( six individuals (clones) known in the wild). There was one patch (clone) at Omaui. Raoulia hookeri is usually found in subalpine river beds but there is a coastal form which may be distinct that occurs sporadically at various localities round the southern coast. It is abundant at Omaui. On the southern coast of the South Island a number of subalpine species mainly bog species descend to sea level. In most places round New Zealand the native coastal vegetation has been heavily modified and replaced by exotics. The native sand binding sedge Ficinia spiralis has been almost totally replaced by marram (Ammophila arenaria). Lupinus arboreus from California is dominant over large areas of dunes.   Coastal dune areas where indigenous plants still form a significant part of the vegetation are now very rare.       

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Dave/David; very nice to see! I like coastal areas very much as I have spent all my childhood summers along the shores of an archipelago.

It is saddening that the native plants loose the battle against foreigners - it is a little strange too. The natives should be better adapted? We have the same problem here too. Like the escaped garden rose R. rugosa which covers much of the beaches in many places now.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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