New Zealand Alpine Flora

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Toole
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Spent yesterday out in the field in the company of a couple of Americans --Sean Hogan ,co-founder of Cistus Nursery near Portland ,Oregon and his partner Nathan.

Sean is a key note speaker this coming weekend at the International Plant Propagators Society conference being held just up the road in Cromwell ,Central Otago.

He has /is giving talks to a number of garden groups throughout the South Island and is being shown the sights by fellow forumist Jandels, (aka Steve).

Boy.... i thought we Kiwis were plant 'nuts'  Wink but we are not in the same league .... Grin Grin

Just a few pics of the visit to an area of ultrabasic rock in Northern Southland.
Being so late in the season very little was in bloom.

Scenery.

The gang.

Sean grabbing a close up, with Jandels in the background.

Helichrysum intermedium on the edge.

Raoulia hookerii.

Sean and Aciphylla aurea.

Gentianella bellidifolia.

Negotiating through red tussock.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The perfect mix of photos.  What are the spruces in the second pic, and the pines in the third photo?

The gentianella flowers are exquisite!
Not too much "bellidifolia" though... ;D

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Did you find anything interesting among the tussocks?
I like the Helichrysum and Aciphylla!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Rick

The trees in question are from the USA ---Pseudotsuga menziesii ,(douglas fir), and Pinus radiata ,(Monterey Pine), both planted in NZ as plantation timber.

Hoy
A roll call back at the vehicle and all of Steves toes were present and accounted for  :D ,so nothing interesting found in the tussocks......... ;) ;)

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Great stuff as always- of course the Helichrysum and Aciphylla are favourites- something about plants on rock, and the A looks esp nice with space to hang at the front!
So jandals are what Jandals was wearing? Flip-flops we'd call them- I was thinking that a very interesting footwear choice for a hike  :o

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Steve Newall
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Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

Howdy . Bit late replying because I went walkabout for awhile . I was wearing jandals (flip-flops) because we didn't venture far from the car . The lack of opuntia seedlings also makes it slightly more practical here in NZ . A few pictures to follow

On Mt.Hutt above the Canterbury Plains (near Christchurch)

Dracophyllum uniflorum

Haastia recurva

Wind shaped manuka above Akaroa

Nikau palms (Rhopalostylis sapida) south of Westport

An urban Weka

A rural Kea adjusting my windshield wiper

Yeah yeah .... whatever

Seed on Raoulia subsericea

Balclutha , New Zealand

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Beautiful photos!  Looks a bit chilly for jandals, no?  ;)  
I can understand a hungry bear (and wild animals must always be hungry - it's a rough life for them!) dismantling a camper to get at food, but what is the attraction of car windshield wipers, tires(?), etc. to keas anyway?  ???

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Jandals wrote:

Howdy . Bit late replying because I went walkabout for awhile . I was wearing jandals (flip-flops) because we didn't venture far from the car . The lack of opuntia seedlings also makes it slightly more practical here in NZ . A few pictures to follow

I fixed my bad spelling above...lol The thought of bare feet and opuntias is indeed a bad combination...lol- unknowingly got a spine under my thumbnail yesterday, but luckily got it out later without too much trouble..

Lovely views! I forgot momentarily that you were heading into winter- interesting to see the chilly heights with green fields in view behind...

Those keas are fascinating, but must be a bit frustrating  ;D

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Steve Newall
Steve Newall's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

I watched keas in action for nearly a decade when I lived and worked in Fiordland . They are very intelligent and just a little curious . Sometimes I think they pull things apart because they are bored and it's a fun thing to do . On occasions I could swear they were laughing at us humans . The pictures are of a kea near Mt.Cook (on a S.P.A.T. mission with Toolie and Doug) which had been ripping up a cushion plant (Phyllachne colensoi) and then telling us how clever it was .

And yes, it is cooling down here and with snow forecast in the hills this week , it's time to head your way . Thanks for the Utah pictures Lori . They make my feet warm up just thinking about it and looking forward to seeing flowering plants again soon

Balclutha , New Zealand

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Beautiful pictures Jandals!

I have no keas here but a pair of magpies doing some research in my beds assisted by blackbirds of course. They haven't showed interest in my car yet but the earthworms have. I do find earthworms on my windshield and roof ???

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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