New Zealand Alpine Flora

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Dave
Great presentation!
You Have shown us many fine alpines, I will be seeking out.
I particularly like the Euphrasia revoluta.
The gaping yellow throats all nested together is a delight to see.

Is Euphrasia revoluta classed as a member of Scrophulariaceae or Orobanchaceae? If it is in the Orobanchaceae family dose it have a specific host plant?

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks for the terrific postings, Dave!  Fabulous plants.  It seems such a different looking alpine terrain, as well, than what I am used to.  What sort of minimum temperature or zone rating would that area experience?  

The most amazing to me of the plants you posted is Psychrophila obtusa... incredible ratio of flower size to plant size!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Weiser wrote:

Dave
Great presentation!
You Have shown us many fine alpines, I will be seeking out.
I particularly like the Euphrasia revoluta.
The gaping yellow throats all nested together is a delight to see.

Is Euphrasia revoluta classed as a member of Scrophulariaceae or Orobanchaceae? If it is in the Orobanchaceae family dose it have a specific host plant?

Thanks John --i believe Euphrasia is now in Orobanchaceae,(although my old reference material says  Scrophulariaceae ). Damn !! :D -i have enough trouble trying to keep up with name changes at a lower level ...

There are some wonderful NZ sps with different coloured flowers and growth patterns ---i have not tried to grow them myself so can't offer you any personal experience in that regard however my observations in the wild are that most prefer wet spots --bogs ,banks of streams and tend to be in the company of small sedges,grasses and maybe are semi parasitic on those .

Interestingly i have somewhere in my photo library a pic of a plant in Fiordland growing on an exposed bank all by itself a metre or two away from any vegetation.
I suspect they could be grown/seed sown in a pot with any small grass .

Skulski wrote:

Thanks for the terrific postings, Dave!  Fabulous plants.  It seems such a different looking alpine terrain, as well, than what I am used to.  What sort of minimum temperature or zone rating would that area experience?  

The most amazing to me of the plants you posted is Psychrophila obtusa... incredible ratio of flower size to plant size!

Thanks Lori

This particular trip i've just posted was to a lower grassland mountain range .

I have managed to locate some facts and figures in relation to the mountain climate of that area --snow generally falls in early June and melts in early November.
Soil freezing may occur down to 50cm on exposed ridges where there is no snow cover.Air temp has been recorded as -18c.
Over a recorded 5 year period in summer the longest period without frost varied from 8 to 13 days....

Fiordland will be a different matter, more akin to what i see in your postings ,with a lot of rock ,screes and lofty peaks.

Cheers dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks for the climate info, Dave.  How strange... an alpine area that is relatively warmer than ours (in terms of absolute lows), yet always so close to freezing, amazing!

After the wonderful plants and scenes in that area, we're all waiting eagerly to see Fiordland too!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Fiordland....yup!

I also thought it was interest about those climate temperatures.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Fiordland --part 1

It's been such a great year for flowering elsewhere down south here Fiordland didn't disappoint.

Although it's an early season with most snow gone ,a bit of rain the day before our arrival meant a wet start to the first valley we visited.

Parts of the valley floor had experienced recent avalanche damage--it was interesting to see how some plants had pushed up through the disturbed area.

Further along growths of Dracophyllum menziesii appeared .

As we reached the valley end and started to climb a number of Dolichoglottis sps were sighted.

As well as Haastia sinclarii var fulvida and Celmisia hectorii.

Cheers dave

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Also on the lower slopes were numerous patches of Celmisia bonplandii--a side view showing it's long dark coloured flowering stalks.

In shady spots a larger Ourisia .O macrocarpa.

We climbed high to reach the bottom of the cliffs to locate Ranunculus hybrids between R buchananii and R. sericophyllus--unfortunately non were in bloom , however i sighted a nice grass ,(name forgotten for the moment :-\0.

Realizing our route over to Black Lake was a bit difficult we decided to drop down before crossing.

AT Black Lake were some gems .....

Aciphylla congesta.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Above the lake and some distance away, Anisotome capillifolia.
Luckily i was able to capture a decent pic by using the camera's 20x zoom function.

Celmisia verbascifolia.

Further on up towards the saddle in wet seepages, Ranunculus sericophyllus.

View from the top, Raoulia buchananii.


;D ;D ;D

Finally --on the way down on small rock rubble and short turf--Myosotis lyallii.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Although rain was forcast yesterday,we decided to visit the dryer east side of Fiordland .By the time moisture arrived at 5 pm my body was in automatic mode   ;) so it was a blessing in some ways to cut short our trip.

A few highlights --
In grassland a nice small Celmisia hybrid and Anisotome haastii.

Depleted vegetative areas, largish mats of Celmisia sessiliflora, Phyllachne colensii and Geum uniflorum.

Bogs have a community of their own --including the hard cushions of Donatia novae zelandiae. Yummy  :-*  how the flowers sit on the plant.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Final posting  :D

Following the stream, Aciphylla pinnatifida --in water and on slightly dryer banks.

Nearby Gentianella montana.

Around the tarns ,wonderful large clumps of Aciphylla crosby-smithii and a single plant of Ranunculus lyalli x R.buchananii.

On exposed ridges were hundreds of Brachyglottis bellidioides. This was a particularly nice form.

Our target was the extensive area of fellfield below the cliffs --here were some beauties. Including Ourisia remotifolia and Ranunculus buchananii.

I leave you with Ranunculus heaven. :-* :-* :-*

Cheers dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

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