New Zealand Alpine Flora

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IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

David wrote:

So for the time being I will continue to use Hebe, Parahebe, Chionohebe, Leonohebe, Heliohebe, and Hebejeebie. I suspect Dodecatheon is still widely used in North America.

Quite so, David - hard to find any grower who cannot  quite easily discern between most of the hebe "variations" and a veronica  or between a primula and a dodecatheon - a lot of us are sticking with the names we recognise, I think.

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

David, does that make Veronica a paraphyletic taxon?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Hoy wrote:

David, does that make Veronica a paraphyletic taxon?

If you think Hebe, Parahebe, Chionohebe, Leonohebe, Heliohebe, and Hebejeebie are worthy of generic status yes but Phil Garnock Jones does not think Northern hemsphere taxonomists would be willing to carve Veronica up into multiple genera.

On thinking a bit more about your question the answer is possibly more accurately no as Veronica has a common line of descent; Hebe and the other Southern hemisphere genera are nested within it.

Sorry to be so equivocal about your question.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks David, I am satisfied. Things don't always have a clear-cut answer!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Went for a little walk today ---Cool conditions with a very strong wind so i kept well away from the edge of the drop offs.

My visit was primarily seed hunting ,and as i wanted to cover as much ground as possible i packed light ,so for the first time in many many years i left the camera in the vehicle ......
I should have known better  :rolleyes: :rolleyes: as there were still some nice gems in flower-----

namely, fields of a very dwarf form of Gentianella bellidifolia ,(syn G. bellidifolia var australis ), and surprisingly a small number of Ranunculus buchananii where the flowers were displaying a spidery effect having just about gone over.I even found one plant that had buds yet to open !.

So i hope you don't mind if i cheat a little bit and show a couple of pics from back in 2011 showing the Gentianella habit in cushion field and the Ranunculus at the spidery stage . :-* :-*

I'm away tomorrow again but this time I'll be taking the camera  :D  

Cheers Dave

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

What superb photos! Gorgeous plants and scenery.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Toole wrote:

So i hope you don't mind if i cheat a little bit and show a couple of pics from back in 2011 showing the Gentianella habit in cushion field and the Ranunculus at the spidery stage . :-* :-*

Cheers Dave

No, not at all!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Thanks Lori and Trond.

Here's a small selection from yesterday.

Gentianella serotina in bloom.

Bold foliage of Aciphylla aurea contrasting with the silver foliage of Celmisia semicordata ssp stricta.

Focus on the growth habit of the crevice loving Celmisia philocremna.

South Island edelweiss ,Leucogenes grandiceps.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Oh Dave,
That C. philocremna is breathtaking ... we see it on the show benches here in the UK, but to see it growing in habitat ... Wow!!!!

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Booker wrote:

Oh Dave,
That C. philocremna is breathtaking ... we see it on the show benches here in the UK, but to see it growing in habitat ... Wow!!!!

I don't agree, Cliff! They are all breathtaking ;) But I would prefere to grow them in a rockery :o

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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