New Zealand Alpine Flora

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Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

I was in contact with Lou at Hokonui Alpines today and was informed their seedlist had been updated and was now on line , so I just had to have a peek. :)

Fresh seed of some of the wonderful small Celmisia sps are listed as well as a number of other NZ alpines including the yummy Aciphylla simplex  :P :P ---- and other gems from regions around the world.

The link is below for those that are interested.

users.actrix.co.nz/hokpines/seedlist.html

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

For the record I recorded 14 species of Celmisia and 6 hybrids. There are two additional species that I am fairly sure are there but did not see and then there are a couple of entities that are are not formally described which may or may not be there. I was busy photographing and documenting the hybrids.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

I will post a few Celmisia pictures to add to what Dave has already posted.

A cushion of Celmisia sessiliflora growing in Chionochloa rigida tussock grassland - the site is quite damp with the moisture loving habe Hebe pauciramosa present as well.

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Every one photographs the same plant; Celmisia sessiliflora x lyallii (C. linearis). (Dave has PVR rights over this plant so we will henceforth call it Celmisia x linearis  ' Toolei ' )

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A colony of Celmisia semicordata subsp. stricta with a large Celmisia verbascifolia centre right.

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Here is a hybrid between the two species (bottom right) growing with its parents Celmisia semicordata susp.stricta and Celmisia verbascifolia (rear)

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Celmisia verbascifolia and Celmisia lyallii behind it

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and the hybrid between the two

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A hybrid between Celmisia verbascifolia and another species which I am guessing is Celmisia brevifolia growing at the bottom right of the photo. It is not a pretty plant

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Celmisia densiflora showing the tomentose white undersides of the leaves. The leave are turned up in response to the dry conditions. This is a widespread species that forms extensive mats. The stems are quite woody.

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Last a hybrid between Celmisia lyallii and Celmisia densiflora.  The plant on the bottom right is the hybrid. The plant beside it is a small specimen of Celmisia lyallii and Celmisia densiflora is growing at the top left.

[attach thumb=9]

Finally another example of the Celmisia densiflora x lyallii hybrid.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Really love those pics with the hybrid celmisia and the parents.

In this pic, is all the white on the center background knoll celmisia, too?
   
    [attach thumb=1]

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Steve Newall
Steve Newall's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

David wrote:

Dave has PVR rights over this plant so we will henceforth call it Celmisia x linearis  ' Toolei '

Now where have I heard that before ?

Nice pics Daves

Balclutha , New Zealand

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

RickR wrote:

Really love those pics with the hybrid celmisia and the parents.

In this pic, is all the white on the center background knoll celmisia, too?
   

The top of the knoll is schist rock and most of the white colour is due to lichens

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have always regarded Celmisia as a rather tender genus but I have come to look at it (or some species at least) as very hardy and possible to grow at my mountain cabin!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Hi Trond,

Celmisias are very diverse in terms of their growth form and habitat requirements. There are a number of snowbank species that may perhaps grow in Norway as in general NZ plants do not tolerate hard frosts. I would suggest that the snowbank species, Celmisia hectorii, Celmisia haastii and Celmisia prorepens might be worth trying. I  tend to avoid growing snowbank plants as I cannot satisfy their winter dormancy requirements. I find some of the the species with woody stems (eg Celmisia densiflora, Celmisia brevifolia, Celmisia walkeri) can be propagated easily from cuttings and do well for me if grown in pots. The larger Celmisias such as C.  semicordata are a bit problematic as they can collapse very rapidly if stressed though there is a coastal species called Celmisia mackaui that seems to thrive here. Celmisia hookeri from East Otago is another species that can be successfully cultivated though the plant I have in my crevice garden seems to have turned up its toes in our current drought.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Wonderful pictures and really interesting to see all those hybrids. There will be AGS members queuing up to grow C. x linearis 'Toolei'!! I am having a bit more success with some of the small alpine species growing in deep moist sharp sand on the cool end of a raised bed - but we did have a wet summer last year! David Sampson used to grow some species well in the garden in the south, but nothing like Alan Furness in Northumberland. I don't think the climate there can be too different to parts of Norway, so you could do well with them Trond.

And thanks for the seedlist website! Some nice things there...

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks David, a long list to start with! Plants are never for sale here so I have to try seed or import from abroad  :-\
I have 3 different places with different climate where I can try plants so hopefully a couple will make it - if I get any!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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