New Zealand Alpine Flora

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David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Have just finished catalouging several batches of pictures.  Here is a bit of a random selection mainly from the St Marys Range in North Otago.

The first is Kelleria villosa var villosa showing the plant and a close up view of the flowers and foliage.

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Pimelea oreophila subsp lepta which is  commonly found in the eastern tussock grasslands of the South Island.

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Pimelea notia a recently described species. differs from the preceeding in that the leaves are sparsely hairy

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Raoulia tenuicaulis a mat forming daisy very common on gravel riverbeds - here it is growing on a road margin.

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One of my most recent preoccupations has been trying to figure out various Celmisia species. Here is Celmisia angustifolia which can sometimes be confused with Celmisia brevifolia.

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It can also be confused with Celmisia densifolia so here are the two growing together. (Celmisia densifolia is top specimen note broader leaves)

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Dracophyllum rosmarinifolium with Gaultheria crassa growing in front. The tussock is the narrow-leaved snow tussock Chionocloa rigida with a patch of the clubmoss Lycopodium fastigiatum in the left foreground.

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A flowering plant of Gaultheria crassa.

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David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

David L, for those unfamiliar with these plants, might it not be useful to include something to give an idea of scale in the photos, or descriptions ?  :)

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

IMYoung wrote:

David L, for those unfamiliar with these plants, might it not be useful to include something to give an idea of scale in the photos, or descriptions ?  :)

Yes, the Kelleria Pimelea and Raoulia pictures are = or > life size.

David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Especially interesting to see the groupings of various plants growing together..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Yes, I too especially like the multiple plant photos, and it's a treat having more than just the "main attraction" identified!

In that last pic, it looks as though the Gaultheria produces a dry compartmentalizes fruit, rather than a berry?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Brilliant images, David.  Many thanks for posting.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

David L
Title: Guest
Joined: 2013-01-31

Cohan,
Very happy to show the plant goupings to give ecological context to the different species.

Rick,
NZ Gaultherias have diverse fruits; the fruit is a capsule ( dry in the case of G. crassa) or may  surrounded by an enlarged fleshy calyx ( G. depressa var novae-zelandiae - the snowberry which is edible) Pernettya was originally distinguished from Gaultheria by the fruit being baccate (according to the glossary this has a fleshy mesocarp) Pernettya is now included in Gaultheria ( Pernettya macrostigma = Gaultheria marostigma) as bigeneric hybrids between various species are common so the fruit characteristics were not a particularly good character to divide the species into different genera.

Cliff,
I hope the S.P.A.T consortium treats you gently when you visit and you are able to see the plants in the field for yourself!

To continue on the Ericaceae theme here is a picture of Leucopogon fraseri which acommon widespread plant but very difficult to get the detail in the flower.

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Next Myrsine nummularia with its very small flowers It has an attractive blue berry

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Nertera scapanioides (or I think it is this species rather than the more common Nertera depressa)

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Anisotome aromatica - there are innumerable forms of this species

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A small cress Cardamine bilobata

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Growing on the same outcrop two small ferns Grammitis poepiggiana and a Hymenophyllum I have not been able to identify.

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Coriaria plumosa which is a primary coloniser and nitrogen fixer (symbiont is Frankia rather than Rhizobium)

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In the beech forest at lower altitudes the mistletoe Peraxilla tetrapetala was flowering profusely. Thie species is very sensitive to possum browsing and was almost wiped out until the pests were brought under control by the Department of Conservation. In both cases the plants are growing on mountain beech Nothofagus solandri var cliffortioides but we also found plants growing on two alternative hosts, Coprosme propinqua and Aristotelia fruticosa.

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David Lyttle
Otago Peninsula

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

David, I never tire of admiring the flora of NZ! Interesting ferns too (any chance of spores?) and an extraordinary mistletoe!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks for answering my query in detail, David.  I ate it up. ;D
Interesting how a genus can encompass both fleshy fruit and dry capsules, isn't it, Mark... ;)

I marvel when I look at so many genera I am familiar with in my region, only to find so much more diversity in the same genera in other places.  So often I say to myself, I never would have guessed it belonged to such and such genus...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

All the lithophytes are very nice!
The mistletoe is quite splendid- nothing grows on trees here except lichens and moss!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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