What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Anne, do you grow Cyclamen purpurascens?  I find it iron-clad hardy here, and as well, forgiving of hot dry weather too, reliably flowering starting mid summer and lasting into early autumn.  Some of the marbled and silver leaf forms are outstanding.  I scratch in the seed, and they come up by the hundreds.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Peden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-04

Well, there you have it! If it will grow for Amy, Anne and Mark then it will certainly grow for me! This could be a case of trying too hard; killing plants. No arguments: I'm looking for peace in 2013 as well as for exciting gardening adventures :)

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Interesting to hear how well Cyclamen purpurascens does in Mark's and other gardens. Here it is a very choice and not so reliable plant, and doesn't generally seed around, though very lovely. We do exceptionally well with C. hederifolium, which I always thought one of the hardiest of species, but even graecum will grow outside whilst rarely flowering well. The most beautiful species (I've always thought) is repandum, but this doesn't like our hot dry summers.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

A few points here taken from Chris Grey-Wilson's "Cyclamen: A Guide for gardener's, Horticulturalists and Botanists" (Batsford  2002) in respect of Cyclamen purpurascens.

In respect of C. fatrense = C. purpurascens he says:-

"In my monograph "The Genus Cyclamen" 1988 I was very dismissive of the related C fratense described in 1971...... from the Fatra region of Slovakia. ASt that time I had not had the chance to observe either the dried type specimen nor better still, any living material. However, I have since been able to observe live collections from several sources and I have now come to the conclusion that this plant cannot be distinguished on botanical grounds; it's prime distinguishing feature is the plain unmarked leaves but such forms exist elsewhere in the species range. However the plant in question behaves rather differently in cultivation and is, for that reason, best identified as the Fatra Form. The earlier confusion results mainly from the claim of the original authors that C fatrense differed from C purpurascens in having plain not marbled leaves. However the Fatra Form is a far more uniform plant in the wild, all the individuals in the limited region in which it is found with plain leaves. The leaves are noticeably  more matt rather than shiny green and with a more scalloped margin, and the flowers are often somewhat larger on average, though they fit within the overall dimensions of C purpurascens. As these variants are in many ways rather minor ones, I am unable to accord the plant even with varietal status"

He goes on to say "that the Fatra Form is a rather better garden plant than the more widespread forms of C purpurascens, being both more prolific in flower and, in favoured sites, seeding around. In the eastern USA, where Cyclamen grow rather poorly compared to many places in Britain, the great exception proves to be the Fatra Form which thrives in healthy colonies in several of the gardens that I visited in 1994. The only conclusion I could draw was that it favoured the acid soils of the region.........."

In his own British garden Grey-Wilson does not appear to find C purpurascens easy and suggests tubers should be deeply planted (6-8 inches) "and capped with a generous mulch of bark chippings or pine needles".  Of American growers he mentions Gerald Fisk "who clearly enjoys great success with this species in his Chicago, Illinois garden"

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Mark, the only cyclamen that has survived for me is what I know as Cyclamen fatrense from Dick Redfield.  Dick was very insistent that it was different from C. purpurascens (which I don't have), and since his knowledge was really encyclopedic. I've always accepted it as such.  It's a lovely plant whatever the name.  I tend to become very fond of plants that do well for me and I'm very fond of this one.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tim, the Cyclamen hederifolium and coum leaf forms are pure delight!

David, I find it surprising about Grey-Wilson advice to deeply plant C. purpurascens (6-8 inches), mine always rise to the surface with 1/2 of the tuber above ground level!  It's somewhat unnerving observing that behavior, as I worry they will dessicate in our summer heat, and if no snow cover, could be winter killed, but it seems to be what they want.  Mine are also growing on a steep hillside, so moisture never lingers there, the area becomes quite dry.

Anne, given that I'm a couple hundred miles to the north of you, I have to imagine C. purpurascens should be hardy and grow for you.  I can save seed this summer.

Some views of Cyclamen purpurascens planted under Magnolia 'Forrest Pink', in one view there was a bumper crop of Magnolia seed littering up the cyclamen and trillium bed beneath ;), a view of self-sown seedlings (all green ones).  I started out with all-green leaf ones, then got some silver and marble leaf types, and now get all kinds of seedlings.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That was very helpful, David. Thanks.

Grey-Wilson's wrote:

I have now come to the conclusion that this plant[C. fatrense] cannot be distinguished on botanical grounds...

but on cultural grounds...
-------------------------------
C. purpurascens growing in Minnesota gardens have their crown at or just below the soil surface, for the most part.  I've always imagined that those "above grade" simply heaved up with frosts, but they do equally well.  A few grow C. hederifolium, and they look very healthy, although I've not seen them in flower.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Thanks, Mark.  I'll look forward to trying the seed.

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Hope you all had a Happy Christmas and New Year.  Thought you would like to see what I saw while walking around the neighborhood.  The snow fell on Boxing Day and, with gatherings from all over the neighorhood, provided just enough snow for this 18 ft. high fellow.  Cars are stopping day and night for picture taking causing quite a traffic jam on the street.  A real delight.  Oh, Oh, I forgot to resize so will send it to you separately.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

And here he is - I hope.  Fran
Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

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