What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Euonymus hamiltonianus var. sieboldianus fruit.  All harvested on 3 October.  

15 days later:
The left, dried in relative darkness in the garage, the right is an outdoor dried bouquet remaining at my south facing doorstep.
             

26 days later:
             

Picea asperata and Liriodendron tuliperifera seed heads.
       

Gymnocladus dioicus and Pinus strous 'Wintergold'
       

Pinus ponderosa    

Fibigia clypeata
         

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

So, you do have snow too, Rick! Nice trees ;) Think I still have to wait some years for my specimen to flower!
I hadn't time to picture my snowclad trees - no daylight when I had time and no snow left on them when I had daylight :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

Some more frost action; still no snow  :( still no cold  :) Saxifrages; 'Hamilton' Cranberry; Androsace sempervivioides -special because it came from seed set here; and Shortia. The drawing is three (four) sided pyramid rock crevice garden concept: I know -way over the top. May I build you one? LOL!

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Hi Michael, how come you have frost action without cold? :o

Now the cold is back here after a few mild days. The hellebore is later than usual but has managed to free itself from much of the snow. The Farrer viburnum is late too but has flowered and new buds are forming. It is still snow patches in front of my house.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Here, the frost comes at night, then disappears when the temperatures rise during the day.  So far, we are having a non-winter.  Joe had to cancel a ski trip to Vail in early December because of lack of snow.  I check the garden every day speaking sternly to plants showing signs of ignoring the shutting down for winter process.  Last week I found a Gentiana dinarica bloom (measely and not fully open, but still...).

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice views, Rick and Michael, Rick- do you have lasting snow?
Anne- you just need to book those ski trips a bit farther north- the ski season started weeks early at many places in Alberta! And the next few days the mountain parks will be some of the warmest places in the province (apart from hot spots like Lethbridge and Calgary!). Our normal daytime this time of year is -6C, today we are forecast to be -7/8 and then -15/-19C daytimes for the rest of the week; still, nights only -19 to -23C, and we could have -30/-40 this time of year..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Before climate change, we always had continuous snow through the winter.  Now, who knows?  Last season, the severe drought lasted right through the winter, and I think we had more winter days without snowcover than with.  Now the bulk of the snow seems to pass just to the south of me.  So, southern Minnesota and Iowa get the snow I would usually get.  They are getting a blizzard right now.

I feel sorry for the children here, when I think of the loads of fun we had as kids sliding down hills, grooming the runs, building snow forts, etc.  On the other hand, nowadays they probably would much rather play with there video games, anyway.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Bombax
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-29

Rick,

Your garden looks great. That ponderosa really is narrow at this point. Your tulip tree flowered very heavily.

John

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

My mother talks about really large amounts of snow when she was younger (snowdrifts nearly to the top of power poles! But I wonder if it was a matter of less forest cover so more severe drifting), but in my lifetime we've never had that- we usually have reasonable cover in mid winter but it can vary from nearly bare in parts of mostly coniferous woods to closer to a couple of feet in low/wetlands.
Fortunately in recent years with so much wild weather around, we have not been far from 'normal' summer or winter...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Hi John!

Glad to see you've made your debut here.  Welcome!

When the leaves drop in the fall, I always find that the Liriodendron bloomed more heavily then I had thought.  ....this season especially.

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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