What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

999 posts / 0 new
Last post
cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

RickR wrote:

Cohan, I have found Forsythia mandshurica to be more cold hardy than even Forsythia x intermedia 'Northern Sun', which is a University of Minnesota introduction, and much touted here. 

I'll try to remember that.. I have no idea what the ones are that I saw locally.. I don't usually look at woodies in local nurseries- usually can't afford any  ;D so I mostly  see the woodies they stick out front or featured in seasonal offerings at supermarkets, home stores etc, and haven't seen any Forsythias at all among those...
I don't recall seeing seed offered either, is it short-lived?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I have some locally-published books that claim Forsythia ovata is the one that tends to get planted around here.  The flower buds can be winter-killed in low snowfall years.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

For forsythia, flower buds are often killed above the snowline here in less cold hardy cultivars.  I have grow Vermont Sun since 2001 and it has never skipped a beat, even in years with little snow.  It stays around 6ft high.  Flower buds above the snowline are hardy to at least -37F (-38C).  That's the coldest it has been here in those years.  There has been at least two springs in that time frame when the Northern Sun shrubs at the Arboretum (9 miles away) have had very significant flower bud damage.  I have never seen F. mandshurica offered for sale at local nurseries, only mail order.  Mine does not set seed.  :(

A pic of Vermont Sun from 2003:

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

RickR wrote:

I have been going through some of my flats of miscellaneous potted materials.  They are all much farther ahead of plants in the ground.  And I came across this surprise:

Clematis ochotensis from wild seed collected in Japan.  I planted the seed back in 2009 and only one sprouted, so I didn't transplant it.  The clematis grew about a foot last season, but died back to what you see.  I never realized it would be such an early bloomer!

You can also see a bunch more seedlings that came up two years later (in 2011) in the pot.  There ya go, Lori: another example for keeping "dead" pots.  But, you probably would have been smart enough to use GA3 in the first place. ;D

Wonderful, Rick. Didn't know that one...looks very nice!

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Maybe sometime if I have a chance I'll try to take a closer look at the Forsythias in town- I've only seen them from the car driving past! I think both I saw were planted in front of businesses (maybe one was a church..).. of course they are in town, so that gives them an advantage already over here, though one local gardener claimed that my 20 miles east of Rocky Mountain House (on the edge of foothills biome and weather) gives me a 2 week frost advantage, and my sheltered property can be kind to woodies..

Now I'll have to look around for them...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

RickR wrote:

Cohan, I have found Forsythia mandshurica to be more cold hardy than even Forsythia x intermedia 'Northern Sun', which is a University of Minnesota introduction, and much touted here. 

I'll try to remember that.. I have no idea what the ones are that I saw locally.. I don't usually look at woodies in local nurseries- usually can't afford any  ;D so I mostly  see the woodies they stick out front or featured in seasonal offerings at supermarkets, home stores etc, and haven't seen any Forsythias at all among those...
I don't recall seeing seed offered either, is it short-lived?

Cohan, Forsythia is extremely easy to root by cuttings! Almost any little piece of a twig will root without treatment of any kind.

Rick, ochotensis looks similar to koreana but is possibly much earlier in bloom?

Wim, some nice spring stuff there! BTW today I spotted the first patches of flowering wood anemones (Anemone nemorosa) along the road. I have had some flowering in my garden for a week. It is not the first spring flower though, the coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara) has been in bloom some time now.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

When we bought our house there was a great deal of forsythia planted too close to the house.  It was removed and every place I dropped a branch there would soon be a new plant.  Our wind chill can make us much colder than the surrounding area and a number of times there were no flowers above the snow line.  It looks cheery at a distance early in the spring.

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Good to know cuttings will root.. in case I ever have a chance to get any :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

Good to know cuttings will root.. in case I ever have a chance to get any :)

Is it impossible to send cuttings in the mail to Canada?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

A nice dwarf form of Forsythia in flower on a raised bed now; F. viridissima 'Broxensis'

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Pages

Log in or register to post comments