What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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Palustris
Palustris's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-02-10

This is our Pulsatilla grandis.

Palustris
Palustris's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-02-10

Thought you might like a quick tour of the greenhouse with a few of the plants on show.

From the door

Propagating Frame.

From the door

From the door.

Anemonella thalictroides

Corydalis solida George Baker

Dianthus arvernensis

Primula allionii Broadwell Milkmaid

Primula allionii GFS 1984

Primula allionii Hemswell Ember

Primula allionii Lindum Eros

Primula allionii Lindum Wedgewood

Primula allionii Malcom’s Mate

Primula allionii Pink Ice

Primula allionii Rachel Kinnon

Primula allionii seedling

Primula allionii Stradbrooke Dream

Primula allionii Tony(?)

Primula allionii unknown

Primula allionii unknown

Primula allionii Wharefedale Ling

Primula Boothman’s Variety

Primula Hall Barn Blue.
There are more plants, but not in flower yet and the Primula allionii are no where near as good as the ones on the show benches, but I am just pleased to have kept them alive for another season.

Lockwood
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-18

Palustris wrote:

Thought you might like a quick tour of the greenhouse with a few of the plants on show.
There are more plants, but not in flower yet and the Primula allionii are no where near as good as the ones on the show benches, but I am just pleased to have kept them alive for another season.

Thank you for sharing Palustris.  Your greenhouse is nice and tidy.  The plants are all gorgeous!  I really like Primula allionii Malcom’s Mate just solid blooms.   8)

Stunning pulsatilla too!

Julie
Greetings from SW Washington The Evergreen State
USDA Zone 8b −9.4 °C (15 °F) -6.7 °C (20 °F)
Heat Zone 4 15-30 days exceeding 30°C(86°F)

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Second that - I've never grown many allionii primulas, but 'Hall Barn Blue' is a great primrose-type for the garden.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

The crazy northeastern weather continues.  Plants seem almost a month ahead.  The Everett, Wa NARGS Meeting was great but cold.  It was warmer at home!
The daffodil is usually 2nd week in April and the douglasia the 3rd or 4th week, yet  here they are.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very nice flowers, Wim and Tim!  
You have so many wonderful things in your greenhouse, Palustris!  

Well, it looks like we will have flowers before the end of March after all... Bulbocodium vernum emerging:

Wow, the start of the alpine season there already, Anne!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Palustris - you have some really nice primulas!

Yesterday and today we have had sun and the temperature reached 14C! We have not seen that since December!

Cardamine enneaphylla has been out in several weeks already but today they stretched their legs substantially! Also the daffodils (probably 'Tête à Tête') and Narcissus cyclamineus opened fully - notice the slug damage of some of the flowers :(

       

The lungworts also come forth in strides now! And for the first time in my garden - Pteridophyllum racemosum in flower! I managed to get hold of some plants last year ;D ;D

       

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

A month ahead in Reno! ;D

Viola beckwithii
[attach thumb=1]

Ranunculus glaberrimus var. glaberrimus
[attach thumb=2]

Fritillaria pudica

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wonderful sights, Trond and John!! 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

It is wonderful how varied gardens are - we have had exceptionally sunny and dry weather this spring, but with hosepipe bans to come because of similarly very dry weather last year when ground water levels are normally replenished. So in fact the alpines come more into their own in the garden because they are more easily looked after where other plants might struggle.

I grow many alpines in a railway sleeper raised bed (ca. 16 x 8 ft) which was made probably around 12 years ago and has had several major replantings. This one is the latest after it had become rather overgrown and weedy and certain plants had become too vigorous. Slowly I am learning to grow smaller plants on it and regular tidying and topdressing each year keeps it looking good.

Will I be able to succeed with that wonderful Alkanna on the bed? Time will tell, but it is planted in a section that is virtually pure grit and other choice species like Campanula zoysii are growing next to it, so given winter protection I have high hopes it might do. It would be wonderful to try that Viola beckwithii of John's too...

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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