What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Your rolling eyes doesn't compute with me...
My yard is all for me, I still have seeds all over the house, my refrigerator is more than half full of overwintering plants, cuttings and seeds stratifying, and I have a potting table set up in the living room!
There are advantages to being single.  ;D
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Gee, it had never crossed my mind before, but from that pic, Lori, it looks like the Ptilostemon would make a good dried flower.

Similar to Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum)

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Forsythia mandshurica 'Vermont Sun' blooms two weeks earlier than F. x intermedia cultivars.  Actually, it is already done now...

             

Adonis 'Fukujukai'

       

A plain ol' Corydalis solida, but very pretty anyway.

             

Cornus mas has lost its petals, but it's still nice looking, too.

             

Hieracium villosum is interesting anytime of year.

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Rick's C solida is a little ahead of mine-- here's a shot from today of the planting area where I have some- they are about 4 feet farther than the stick you see sticking up out of the snow...
Second shot is another bed- just between the shrubs and the posts (stuck into the snow to keep shovels and snowplows away from the beds). this is where I wait for Pulsatillas, Muscari, etc...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

cohan wrote:

Rick's C solida is a little ahead of mine-- here's a shot from today of the planting area where I have some- they are about 4 feet farther than the stick you see sticking up out of the snow...
Second shot is another bed- just between the shrubs and the posts (stuck into the snow to keep shovels and snowplows away from the beds). this is where I wait for Pulsatillas, Muscari, etc...

;D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Good stuff there Rick, I see that you're experiencing the same early spring we are here.  Interesting about Forsythia mandshurica, being an early flowering variety.  Even though common and ubiquetously planted, I do love Forsythia.  I don't have any in my yard, but that's okay because they're in everyone else's yard, and I get to see them everywhere.  Need to rectify the situation, and plant some of the different varieties; really like those that have deeper gold color flowers.  The Adonis is most cheerful, can't believe I don't have any adonis in my garden.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

F. mandshurica 'Vermont Sun' flowers are twice as large as those of F. x intermedia cvs.  Lighter yellow, not gold.  I am not sure how or if it differs from the species.    But it is a very tidy shrub in comparison to most unruly forsythias, and with oval leaves, not at all narrow or pointed. 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I have fond memories of Forsythia from seeing it -esp in charmingly overgrown plantings in the yards of Victorian houses- in Toronto; I had thought they weren't hardy here, but have seen a couple growing happily in the town where I work.-- on the south sides of buildings, I think.. I'd like to try some if I can find seed/the right varieties :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Spring really has started over here, with temps up to 18°C and constant sun, flowers are popping up everywhere:

Olsynium douglasii 'Album'
Saxifraga wendelboi
Ranunculus ficaria 'Salad Bowl'
Anemone blanda
Primula 'Aire Waves'
Pulsatilla vulgaris 'Papageno'
Veronica thessalica
Ranunculus alpestris
Soldanella carpatica 'Alba'
Morisia monanthos

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I grew a seedling Pulsatilla Papageno once.  Frankly, I couldn't figure out why people liked it.  Flowers had very asymmetrically divide, sparse petals and were very ragged looking.  Yours, Wim, looks nice.  I love all of those creeping veronicas, too.

Cohan, I have found Forsythia mandshurica to be more cold hardy than even Forsythia x intermedia 'Northern Sun', which is a University of Minnesota introduction, and much touted here. 

I have been going through some of my flats of miscellaneous potted materials.  They are all much farther ahead of plants in the ground.  And I came across this surprise:

             

Clematis ochotensis from wild seed collected in Japan.  I planted the seed back in 2009 and only one sprouted, so I didn't transplant it.  The clematis grew about a foot last season, but died back to what you see.  I never realized it would be such an early bloomer!

You can also see a bunch more seedlings that came up two years later (in 2011) in the pot.  There ya go, Lori: another example for keeping "dead" pots.  But, you probably would have been smart enough to use GA3 in the first place. ;D

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

RickR wrote:

You can also see a bunch more seedlings that came up two years later (in 2011) in the pot.  There ya go, Lori: another example for keeping "dead" pots.  But, you probably would have been smart enough to use GA3 in the first place. ;D

You greatly overestimate me :o... I often do things in the most inefficient way possible!  :D  Great example of delayed germination, though.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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