What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Looks like spring is (was?) well under way for you, Palustris :) Looks like a great large garden, with lots of different kinds of planting areas!
I'm pretty sure we went through this not long ago- but my memory is not working today...lol where are you and what is your first name?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very nice, Palustris!  Your greenhouse plants are just amazing!  I assume from your photos (the green lushness and beautiful buildings) that you are in the UK?  It would be helpful if you could add your location to your signature in "Profile"... (always nice to know where abouts the garden is.   :) )

More signs of life in the rock garden, as I wait for Wednesday's snow to melt:
Buds on Androsace carnea ssp. brigantiaca; buds also on Douglasia montana - some winter burn this year; Potentilla uniflora and buds on Androsace septentrionalis (a loose lanky form, not the compact beauties I see in the mountains here):

   

New leaves on Aquilegia laramiensis; Eriogonum caespitosum, bought from Beaver Creek last year, has come through well; Campanula orphanidea, from seed in 2010:
   

Buds on the most developed Pulsatilla I found on my little trek... dare I hope that this is one of the Pulsatilla patens I've planted?  (Could just be one of the many self-seeded Pulsatilla vulgaris though...)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Always nice to see what have survived the winter. In fact, I miss that feeling of excitement to watch the snow recede and plants showing anew :D
Last year we discussed whether Dryas overwintered with green leaves. Well - here's the answer for this winter regarding D octopetala: (about 1000m altitude and very exposed site with little snow cover)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's another photo of Dryas octopetala emerging from winter by Merlin:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=934.msg16427#msg16427

Lewisia longipetala, emerging:

It's probably just a passing anomaly, but this tiny Aciphylla simplex appears to be lifelike and pliable... will probably soon be dealt a death blow by a late hard freeze...

First buds on Hepatica transylvanica in my cold yard (I know that people in warmer parts of the city have had hepatica in bloom for some time already):

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Draba lasiocarpa and and the evergreen gold foliage of a creeping veronica.

       

Echium russicum and Fibigia eriocarpa.  I haven't seen this one bloom yet, and so far it looks just like Fibigia clypeata (maybe perhaps less ruffling of the foliage?).

       

Sanguinaria canadensis 'Multiplex' has lost its pink blush.  That's Fibigia clypeata in the right background.

             

Thermopsis fabacea is always an early sprout.  A purple Corydalis solida with Variegated Bulbous Oatgrass (Arrhenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum 'Variegatum') to the right.

       

And bless its little heart, a one year old Pulsatilla georgica seedling, blooming at just 2 inches. :o 8)

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Rick- early bloom on the Pulsatilla!

Lori- good luck with the Aciphylla! Looks like it has really nice leaves...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

Here's another photo of Dryas octopetala emerging from winter by Merlin:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=934.msg16427#msg16427

Seems to have had better snow cover ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

Here's another photo of Dryas octopetala emerging from winter by Merlin:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=934.msg16427#msg16427

Lewisia longipetala, emerging:

It's probably just a passing anomaly, but this tiny Aciphylla simplex appears to be lifelike and pliable... will probably soon be dealt a death blow by a late hard freeze...

First buds on Hepatica transylvanica in my cold yard (I know that people in warmer parts of the city have had hepatica in bloom for some time already):

Not very long leaves, though on that longipetala  ;) Aciphylla is a genus I have tried several times but they are not fond ofwinter wet :(

RickR wrote:

Draba lasiocarpa and and the evergreen gold foliage of a creeping veronica.

Echium russicum and Fibigia eriocarpa.  I haven't seen this one bloom yet, and so far it looks just like Fibigia clypeata (maybe perhaps less ruffling of the foliage?).

Sanguinaria canadensis 'Multiplex' has lost its pink blush.  That's Fibigia clypeata in the right background.

Thermopsis fabacea is always an early sprout.  A purple Corydalis solida with Variegated Bulbous Oatgrass (Arrhenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum 'Variegatum') to the right.
And bless its little heart, a one year old Pulsatilla georgica seedling, blooming at just 2 inches. :o 8)

Some nice ones, Rick. Impressive Pulsatilla :o

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Palustris, a very beautiful pulsatilla.  Do you know which one it is?

Palustris
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-02-10

Spiegel wrote:

Palustris, a very beautiful pulsatilla.  Do you know which one it is?

Not really, it has been suggested that it is a form of P. ambigua. All I can say is that it is slap bang in the middle of Pulsatilla rubra with deep red flowers, P. vulgaris with normal purple flowers and P. grandis with lilac coloured blooms. It is a self seeded one that is for sure.  I have a picture of it in flower for the first time in 2006.

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