What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Finally got out and photographed the irish trough, or stone sink.  It was delivered by a pickup truck and 4 football players (using a coouple of 2x6s), moved it into position.  It is in this position to stay.  Not a good time of year to photograph it and it's only half planted still.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Sorry, I don't know what happened to the photos.  I'll try again.  Computers are a mystery to me.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Masterfully done, Anne, and befitting of your awesome garden as a whole.  

    Kinda peaceful and Zen like, too.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Beautiful trough, Anne! the planting is looking good so far- I do like the outcropping, it is rather zen at this stage as Rick says..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

I really l;ike the outcropping,too.  It's necessary since this is a shallow trough.  I'm convinced that the deeper the trough, the better, like a mini raised bed.  In my climate everything freezes solid.  The irish trough has such thick walls but that's still not enough protection from freezing.  I use rain covers on some of the troughs, designed by Mark Mazer of NARGS.  They are open on the ends and arched over the trough.  They get lots of sun and wind but no drenching rain.  You do have to brush the snow off the top or it will bow down.  The top is made of plexiglas (I think).  I wish Mark would weigh in.  They are so marvelously designed and I'll put a picture on soon.  I haven't installed them yet for the winter.

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

RickR wrote:

Funny how even a dead looking prenanthes like plant can be interesting - and not even in relation to the aforementioned winged patterned frost (which is fascinating): I assume the leaf blades senesced, fell off and blew away, while the petioles dried and remained...
I don't think I have ever seen that on a herbaceous plant before.

Rick; I recall the leaves and petioles do not fall from the stem. As I said, I clip all back so what remains is the (older seasons growth) stems. This is doable because all top growth dies, only buds on the caudex remain. The ice wings seem to emanate from the dead stem itself which really is weird as I cannot figure where all the water comes from. It must be coming from the earth below; a sort-of "frost finger" effect. I had a picture of the plant but computer ate most photos (that weren't posted to NARGS!) prior to June. I was out this morning shooting frost formation on a few other plants so may post those. If my goat-plant survives winter; I'll strive to get a photo up. It is interesting, I think, botanically and that it thrives here being from such a southern area.

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

The redundant hardiness of some plants is quite fascinating- hinting at interesting pasts!

Speaking of interesting pasts, I was looking at Dasynotus daubenmirei in the Alplains catalogue,
Dasynotus daubenmirei (Boraginaceae) (40x40,Z4,P,L,3:8w) ......................................... 15 seeds / $6.00 15083.12 (W) Idaho Co., ID, 4920ft,1500m. A superb member of the Borage family producing multiple stems clothed in sparsely-hairy, oblanceolate leaves and beautiful clusters of snow-white, inch-wide flowers
photo:
http://www.alplains.com/images/DasyDauben.jpg
This plant is discussed in the Jan 2012 issue of the International Rock Gardener online magazine, where it is mentioned that it is believed to be a relic of Cenozoic forests, a 'paleoendemic'
Quite fascinating, though from a little google searching, I did not find out too much about what sort of ancient forests those would have been- the Cenozoic is a long period! and I don't imagine the reference is to the sub-tropical forests that would have covered the area early on.. still, very interesting, and enough to make me want to grow this forest opening plant :).. maybe there should be an 'armchair botanising for Boraginaceae' thread ;)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

... maybe there should be an 'armchair botanising for Boraginaceae' thread ;)

Well, you could start one.  :)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

lol-- not sure I'd have any further entries, though...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Has to be armchair botanising for me the next days. Although it is mild now (+7C) we have a lot of snow. Farther south they were hit hard by the gale and a train and several hundred cars were caught in the snowdrives. Hundreds of people had to stay all night in the cars. If this had happened in the mountains nobody had rised an eyebrow but this is in the lowland and in the mildest part of the country  :o  When I was out driving last night it reminded me more of a mountain crossing than a trip to the airport!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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