What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

Submitted by Tim Ingram on

[Moderator's note: We have been a bit remiss at splitting this off into a new thread for 2012, but here it is, finally!
Lori]

A mix of things flowering or looking interesting in the garden at the moment. The garden is waking up with hellebores and many bulbs soon to come.

Narcissus panizzianus grown from Archibald seed. The flowers are small but always very early.
Muscari pseudomuscari, ditto. This is a lovely tidy species, growing here with a selection of Cyclamen hederifolium.
Cyclamen coum. Two forms with very silvered leaves from Tilebarn Nursery.
Corydalis quantmeyeriana 'Chocolate Stars' growing with cyclamen and Astelia nervosa. The corydalis is new to me and I haven't yet seen the flowers, but what foliage! I rather like this combination.
Sarcococca confusa. An unassuming shrub but one of the most delightful and scented winter flowers, and usefully tolerant of dry shade.

Comments


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 01/29/2012 - 11:25

Especially vibrant cyclamen leaves, Tim!

I thought those were water droplets on the corydalis leaves, but googling shows my error: http://www.perennials.com/seeplant.html?item=1.167.580
Very impressive!

A friend showed me a corydalis with similarly shaped green leaves in an old botany professor's yard.  (I don't remember it having that cool dotting, though.)  The man doesn't remember what it is.  I saw it out of bloom last year, and I remember saying to my friend: "You saw it blooming and you're sure it is a corydalis?"  That corydalis (and the rest of the yard that includes one of the heavily divided leaf hellebores sp.) is on my slate for investigation this spring...


Submitted by Mark McD on Sun, 01/29/2012 - 14:11

OMG, that superb clump of cyclamen coum, WOW, those leaves are drop-dead gorgeous.

And Rick, I'm glad you provided the link and called attention to the Corydalis leaves; I had come to the same conclusion that I was seeing dew droplets.  What an unusual and attractive Corydalis.  Tim: not fair you have all this going on now! 


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 01/29/2012 - 14:23

Tim wrote:

A mix of things flowering or looking interesting in the garden at the moment. The garden is waking up with hellebores and many bulbs soon to come.

Narcissus panizzianus grown from Archibald seed. The flowers are small but always very early.
Muscari pseudomuscari, ditto. This is a lovely tidy species, growing here with a selection of Cyclamen hederifolium.
Cyclamen coum. Two forms with very silvered leaves from Tilebarn Nursery.
Corydalis quantmeyeriana 'Chocolate Stars' growing with cyclamen and Astelia nervosa. The corydalis is new to me and I haven't yet seen the flowers, but what foliage! I rather like this combination.
Sarcococca confusa. An unassuming shrub but one of the most delightful and scented winter flowers, and usefully tolerant of dry shade.

nice to see the flowers, but especially like the Cyclamen leaves!


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 01/29/2012 - 15:22

I like all those plants! But if I could get only one and had to choose, I had chosen the Corydalis, no doubt! I have a soft spot for that genus! However, love Cyclamen too - a hard choice :-\

I had hoped that our mild weather should continue but no luck. Today is our first day this winter with temperature below 0oC all day and night. And more is to come :( The forecast says down to -10oC during the week :o >:( and almost no snow :'(


Submitted by AmyO on Sun, 01/29/2012 - 17:52

Tim wrote:

A mix of things flowering or looking interesting in the garden at the moment. The garden is waking up with hellebores and many bulbs soon to come.

Cyclamen hederifolium[/i].
Cyclamen coum. Two forms with very silvered leaves from Tilebarn Nursery.

Holy crow!! Those Cyclamen are gorgeous!! :o :o :o
Would you consider trading Cyclamen seed for Primula seed?? Please oh please? ;D


Submitted by Lockwood on Sun, 01/29/2012 - 19:17

Tim wrote:

Cyclamen coum. Two forms with very silvered leaves from Tilebarn Nursery.

:o Tim - those are some very stunning cyclamen coum.  Very unfortunate Tile Barn Nursery has closed.

Like Amy, I'd be willing to trade for some seed.  

Julie


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 01/29/2012 - 20:10

Beautiful, Tim, and always a shock to see plants in bloom in the "middle of winter"!  ;)  ;D

I see that Corydalis quantmeyerana 'Chocolate Stars' is available again this year from Fraser's Thimble Farms.  I bought it a couple of years ago from them but had no success with wintering over... actually, I'm not even sure if it survived the summer.  Your photo is a powerful temptation to try it again!


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 01/29/2012 - 20:47

I missed the Cory first time round, till Trond mentioned it (with my dodgy internet connection, I don't always enlarge all the pics) but it is very cool-- always love non-green foliage :)


Submitted by Doreen on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 01:01

A belated Happy New Year everyone as I catch up with posting some pre-Christmas pics.
First up, Erythronium 'Ruapuna Dawn', a revolutum hybrid raised by Joan Whillans in New Zealand, and thought to be the same parentage as Ian Young's 'Craigton Cover Girl'.
Next a clump of seed-raised Lilium mackliniae . One plant has flowers with a dark red eye so I'm hoping to get some seed from that.
I've always had a soft spot for buttercups, and Ranunculus parnassifolius does well for me in a polystyrene trough. It seems to need lots of sun and lots of water though to stop it getting long and leggy.
Then a plant I used to cossett in a pot in the UK but which grows and spreads happily outdoors here under a dogwood bush, the Canadian bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis 'Multiplex'. Many years ago when I first got my hands on this plant, I was told not to be frightened of chopping it up and moving it around, even "arranging" nice little noses in a clean pot to take to a show a couple of weeks away. Just ignore it bleeding red sap, it's tougher than it looks, and the foliage is pretty too.   


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 03:47

Doreen - that Sanguinaria is spectacular! We used to have a group nearly as good but I have not kept it going. I think regular division is the answer. i have the single version which seeds around but never makes clumps like this.


Submitted by AmyO on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 06:00

Doreen your photos are so wonderful to see on this cold and slightly snowy day! I woke up to just a dusting and we need so much more on the ground here!!
You're right about the Sanguinaria...I wacked up a patch at work last fall and potted the pieces for sale this spring! So easy!
Here is a photo of a patch of the single flowered form at the end of my road last spring! It's huge and interspersed with Trillium erectum although you can't see them.  :P


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 09:36

Wonderful images of excellently grown plants, Doreen!

The way Amy shows wild Sanguinaria canadensis growing is the same way they colonize here in Minnesota.  Larger single clonal clumping is not rare, but one to three noses per plant is the norm.  However, these same plants grown in a garden setting would likely have a great propensity to form large clumps.


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 09:51

Doreen, now I know what to aim for! My plants never grow like that :(

Amy, interesting to see how the bloodroot grows naturally. My second goal is to copy that in a patch in my woodland!

Does the bloodroot need another clone to set fertile seed?


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 12:30

Great flowers, Doreen- the Ranunculus is lovely..

Amy- love the patch of Sanguinaria.. this is another one I'd love to establish here (its not native) I could give it a nice place to spread out like the patch you show .. haven't got any yet (on the list...lol)


Submitted by AmyO on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 14:53

When these set the copious amounts of seed they always do....I'll let you know and perhaps we can do some swapping!  ;)
I don't know if you need two clones for pollination...but everywhere I have planted them they always set lots of seed. I have to get in early to clip off the seed pods, otherwise they would take over large areas of my garden...and I don't have the space to let them go. But I love the look so I keep them in check and let smallish patches spread.
Here's a close-up of the Bloodroot and of the Trillium erectum growing in the same area.....


Submitted by Sellars on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 15:34

Fantastic pictures Doreen.  Thanks for posting.

In general garden alpines do not look as good as wild plants.  However I have seen Ranunculus parnassifoliuis growing wild in the Pyrenees and it did not look as gorgeous as your garden plant.


Submitted by Doreen on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 16:52

Glad to have brightened up your wintry days up in the northern hemisphere! Thanks for all your kind comments.
Amy: lovely to see your pictures of the bloodroot growing wild. Glad I'm not the only one carving up my plants!
Did anyone see Hilary Birks' photo of a stunning ribbon of the single form growing in immaculate condition in her garden in Bergen, Norway, on the UK AGS on-line show that just ended in December? Well worth a look.
Trond: I had just one plant of the single form in my garden 3 or 4 years ago but lost  killed it. But just this spring I noticed three or four little seedlings had popped up where the parent had been, so it looks as if it's self-fertile, at least to some degree.
David: I agree with you about cultivated plants generally being poor imitations of the wild plant. Would love to see the ranunculus in the wild (especially the Nuria form) and if a few seeds might happen to drop into my pocket ...  ;)


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 22:33

Wow!  I'm just joining the chorus of admiration for your plants, Doreen!  It seems that growing in rock garden conditions really brings out the best for Ranunculus parnassifolius... I must remember to move some seedlings into similar conditions!!

How wonderful to have a woodland full of bloodroot and trillium, Amy!  It's lovely!


Submitted by RickR on Wed, 02/01/2012 - 00:28

          Eight Candles - Sanguinaria canadensis

             

    If it looks like an old photograph, it is!  Scanned from 1980.


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 02/01/2012 - 13:18

RickR wrote:

          Eight Candles - Sanguinaria canadensis
    If it looks like an old photograph, it is!  Scanned from 1980.

Rick, same alluring attitude as 32 years ago!


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 02/04/2012 - 14:30

We've had a couple dreary winter foggy days in this snowless winter, and the frost is beginning to build.  Leaving some of the perennials intact through the winter has proven to a wise decision this year.

Chasmanthium latifolium (Northern Sea Oats) has much of its seedheads still intact.

       

Allium thunbergii 'Ozawa' and Eryngium amethystinum (Amethyst Sea Holly)

       

Symphiotrichium(Aster) sericeum (Silky Aster) with Melica ciliata (Silky Spike Melic) and Silky Aster close up

       

Fargesia rufa (Rufa Bamboo) and a Senna sp.

       


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 02/04/2012 - 14:39

Needles of Pinus pondersosa (Ponderosa Pine) and Pinus strobus 'Wintergold' (Wintergold White Pine)

       

Our wild Juniperus virginiana (Eastern Red Cedar)

       

Picea asperata (Chinese Dragon Spruce)

       

Thujopsis dolbrata
var. hondai (Hiba Arborvitae)

       


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 02/04/2012 - 14:45

Lots of great winter texture and colour, Rick! We have had very little frost this winter compared to the last few- not an especially photogenic winter- the last few I took a lot more photos..


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 02/04/2012 - 14:58

Lori wrote:

Very nice, Rick!  Does the foliage on the bamboo survive the winter?

It survives the winter fine.  It's the early spring that does them in.  I usually remove about half of the foliage before serious growth commences.  Since we are having such a mild winter, maybe the ground will thaw fast enough to not have this problem this season.  (It has only dipped below zero (-18C) for three nights this season!).

             


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 02/04/2012 - 15:42

Well, I'm amazed enough that the bamboo survives the winter, let alone the above-ground parts!  Must try that one someday, if I come across it.


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 02/04/2012 - 22:10

There was no cultivar name attached when I bought Fargesia rufa in Madison, WI as a large plant, bulging the #5 pot (about 4 gal. size).  I divided it into three parts, two of them kept whole, and the third further divided.  The two did great.  Any division less than six culms, died.  My advice: don't divide any less than ten culms.

Fargesia rufa seems to do far better than F. nitida for me.  I had F. nitida for 5-6 years, and it poked along, never getting bigger or smaller.  Then the year when all the F. nitidas in the world bloomed (mine tried to, too), it didn't last through the following winter.


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 02/05/2012 - 02:21

Nice pics, Rick! Not much to picture here now except some colourful birds at the feeders.

I still get seedlings popping up from that F. nitida bloom! Seems to be seeds in the soil still where I had those shrubs. The first seedlings that germinated are still not as big as their parents were at blooming time but are cathing up fast.


Submitted by AmyO on Sun, 02/05/2012 - 06:58

Hoy wrote:

Nice pics, Rick! Not much to picture here now except some colourful birds at the feeders.

Same here! It's 15*f this morning with no snow cover!
Here is a pic I took a couple days ago of what was a nice big Primula marginata 'Linda Pope'!  :-[
The squirrels have been breeding like mad and we are overrun! So far this is the only one that has been
destroyed like this....keeping fingers crossed, but don't hold out much hope for the rest! :(


Submitted by Mark McD on Sun, 02/05/2012 - 07:35

AmyO wrote:

Same here! It's 15*f this morning with no snow cover!
Here is a pic I took a couple days ago of what was a nice big Primula marginata 'Linda Pope'!  :-[
The squirrels have been breeding like mad and we are overrun! So far this is the only one that has been
destroyed like this....keeping fingers crossed, but don't hold out much hope for the rest! :(

Oh Amy, that's heartbreaking, those dang squirrels :(.  We're in a similar situation here, cold, the ground mostly open and without snowcover, and the squirrels are still having a field day with their infernal digging.  For a couple items that I planted out last fall, for which I was worried about squirrel mischief because they seem attracted to freshly dug areas, I covered the resting plants with open wire mesh, just laid on the ground.


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 02/05/2012 - 08:03

Sorry to hear aboutthe damage, Amy!
Fortunately no problems with squirrels here, and neither with the slugs at this time! -1/2 C today and southeasterly wind with loads of snow. Tomorrow they say we'll get +4C and rain and then cold again! I would rather have the snow for a couple of weeks more though.


Submitted by AmyO on Sun, 02/05/2012 - 13:45

Quote:

Oh Amy, that's heartbreaking, those dang squirrels :(.  We're in a similar situation here, cold, the ground mostly open and without snowcover, and the squirrels are still having a field day with their infernal digging.  For a couple items that I planted out last fall, for which I was worried about squirrel mischief because they seem attracted to freshly dug areas, I covered the resting plants with open wire mesh, just laid on the ground.

Thanks for the commiseration you guys!  :P
Mark..I'm thinking of using more ree-may to cover plants in the gardens that routinely get some form of squirrel damage. I use it all winter & spring to cover flats of seedlings and young potted plants and so far has worked very well. I do also use hardware cloth on the larger crates of plants, esp. the more valuable ones....Trillium!!


Submitted by Mark McD on Fri, 02/10/2012 - 18:38

Working from home today, I walked the garden on this mild winter day reaching 46 F (8 C), the ground still solidy frozen. On the warm sunny south side of my house, the top couple of inches of soil are frost-free, this marks the earliest flowering ever of Galanthus and a single precocious bloom on Colchicum kesselringii. 

An almost snowless winter thus far, supposed to get a mere 2-3" tomorrow, followed by sunny deep freeze.


Submitted by AmyO on Fri, 02/10/2012 - 18:41

Those sweet and delicate looking snowdrops are so amazingly tough!! They look wonderful to this color starved gardener!! :P


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 02/11/2012 - 01:15

Nice, Mark! My snowdrops are still covered by 10cm of hardcrusted snow but the forecast says mild weather this weekend and next week. Maybe I can see my snowdrops and crocuses when I return from England next Saturday!


Submitted by Toole on Mon, 02/13/2012 - 01:32

Wonderful to see Colchicum kesselringii Mark .I germinated some seed of this last year and a check of the pot tonight confirms i haven't lost them .... ;D

Here's Campanula thyrsoides -- noticed it had a wonderful scent as i was in close taking a macro shot.(I've edited the pics using a vignette setting as an experiment).

Cheers Dave.


Submitted by Mark McD on Mon, 02/13/2012 - 19:22

Nice vignettes Dave!  Such a fascinating Campanula, I like those types that defy our normal impression of a genus and manifest themselves in such whimsical ways.  And scented too, not so many campanulas are noticeably scented, that's an added perk.

I'm sure my single precocious Colchicum flower will be toast after our weather has gone back into some deep freezing, but many more flowers should appear when it is safer to do so.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 02/13/2012 - 22:29

I've never noticed a scent from Campanula thyrsoides - is it the dry air here or my lack of attention?  ???   I'll have to take notice this summer!


Submitted by Sellars on Mon, 02/13/2012 - 22:32

The first Frit is in flower in the greenhouse; Fritillaria pudica - one of our natives.  Another almost native, Douglasia nivalis from the Wenatchee Mountains, is in flower in the Alpine Shed.


Submitted by Toole on Tue, 02/14/2012 - 01:08

Just went out and sniffed Campanula thyrsoides again --i'd call it a citrus scent .Yummy  :)

Nice pics David --while repotting bulbs recently i see i'm just left with a swarm of F.pudica babies --no trace of the flowering sized bulb that bloomed the last two years  :-\...

Cheers Dave..


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 02/14/2012 - 20:23

Toole wrote:

Just went out and sniffed Campanula thyrsoides again --i'd call it a citrus scent .Yummy  :)

Nice pics David --while repotting bulbs recently i see i'm just left with a swarm of F.pudica babies --no trace of the flowering sized bulb that bloomed the last two years   :-\...

Cheers Dave..

The very first thing I do with any flowering plant, is take a whiff, for me it is one of the primary aspects of gardening.


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 02/14/2012 - 22:19

McDonough wrote:

The very first thing I do with any flowering plant, is take a whiff, for me it is one of the primary aspects of gardening.

Alas my nose doesn't always detect what other people do.  Gardenias, for instance, have no smell for me!  I do smell things other people can't, though.  I have a friend with a particularly good sniffer, and sincerely loves to smell flowers, etc.  When she comes over, I take good note of her "experiences" as we walk the yard.


Submitted by Fermi on Wed, 02/15/2012 - 01:15

Around the garden this week we have the first of the Belladonnas, Amaryllis belladonna - most likely a hybrid - in a cerise/deep pink form

Lycoris sprengeri

and Lycoris incarnata

We can't grow Gaultherias but the berries on this Eremophila debilis almost make up for it!

cheers
fermi


Submitted by Mark McD on Wed, 02/15/2012 - 06:51

Fermi wrote:

We can't grow Gaultherias but the berries on this Eremophila debilis almost make up for it!

cheers
fermi

Fermi, you folks down under have some of the coolest plants ever, the fruits on that Eremophila are fetching!!!  Never heard of Eremophila, so looked it up, what a suprise, a large and colorful genus (beautiful flowers too), all endemic to Australia.  Here are some highlights:

Eremophila, Emu Bush, Poverty Bush or Fuchsia, 215 recognised species, all of which are endemic to Australia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eremophila_(plant)

The genus name Eremophila is derived from the Greek words eremos (desert) and phileo (love), alluding to the species' adaptation to arid environments.

E. subfloccosa
http://www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2006/eremophila-subfloccosa-pl-700.jpg

Google images:
https://www.google.com/search?q=Eremophila&hl=en&prmd=imvns&source=lnms&tbm=isch&ei=prY7T7fvEuPX0QHHu6S6Cw&sa=X&oi=mode_link&ct=mode&cd=2&sqi=2&ved=0CAwQ_AUoAQ&biw=1340&bih=560


Submitted by Mark McD on Wed, 02/15/2012 - 07:01

RickR wrote:

McDonough wrote:

The very first thing I do with any flowering plant, is take a whiff, for me it is one of the primary aspects of gardening.

Alas my nose doesn't always detect what other people do.  Gardenias, for instance, have no smell for me!  I do smell things other people can't, though.  I have a friend with a particularly good sniffer, and sincerely loves to smell flowers, etc.  When she comes over, I take good note of her "experiences" as we walk the yard.

I'm one of those people with a particularly good sniffer :)  When visiting gardens, I might point out how this or that plant is sweet smelling or aromatic in some way, often a complete surprise to the gardener who has grown the subject plant for years but hadn't yet bothered to check for scent.  I guess I'm just a hand's-on and nose-on sort of gardener ;D.  I have heard it said that woman have better sense of smell than men, not sure if that's urban legend or has any basis in fact. 

But it's the aspect of scent that can actually influence my planting decisions.  For example, I planted a clump of Aster pilosus at the base of my deck stair, grows to 4'-5' tall with myriad very late white blooms that waft an enticing scent of vanilla, reminiscent of sugar cookies baking.
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=159.msg1037#msg1037


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Wed, 02/15/2012 - 12:18

Fermi - nice to see those Lycoris flowering. I have a few that originated from Jack Elliott's greenhouse and which I have tried outside; they grow but have very rarely flowered, presumably lacking sufficient summer heat (even though they are against a south wall). I wonder if anyone has tried crossing them with nerines? They do have a wonderful range of colours.


Submitted by Mark McD on Sat, 02/18/2012 - 10:28

Not an impressive display yet, but I believe this is the earliest date in my garden that a crocus has opened a flower, in 25 years that I have been here; Crocus vitellinus showing its first flower on February 18, 2012.  Always the first crocus to bloom, but typically not until March. The shiny strap foliage nearby is Sternbergia lutea, foliage always stay evergreen and in good shape through our winters, with or without snow.

Back to my precocious Colchicum kesselringii; the flower on the left is the same one I showed taken 8 days ago, it has narrow pointed petals, the one on the right is a different form with larger flowers and wider rounded petals, just showing up.

The nights have gone down as low at 10 F (-12 C), but these blooms seem unfazed, their early showing from a non-ending succession of very mild winter days, mostly sunny, into the mid 40s F, was 48 F yesterday.  Still no snow, this might be a snowless winter, a rarity.


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 02/18/2012 - 14:47

Nice, Mark! It is always a pleasure to welcome the first crocus in spring!

Just come back from England early this morning (about 1 AM) to a very wet but snowfree garden (been on job, no holiday and no time to visit gardens  :( ).
Rain all day and although the garden is full of flowering snowdrops, crocuses and spring snowflakes they do not open fully in the rain and I didn't bother taking pictures. Also the mahonias and witch hazels are in bloom.
Sadly no rest however, as we set out for Oslo early tomorrow!


Submitted by Fermi on Mon, 02/20/2012 - 01:45

Mark,
glad you like the Eremophilas, they are a very varied clan.
Not in our garden, but not far away in a vacant block is a great flowering of the South African Amaryllis belladonna,

cheers
fermi


Submitted by cohan on Mon, 02/20/2012 - 23:40

Fermi wrote:

Mark,
glad you like the Eremophilas, they are a very varied clan.
Not in our garden, but not far away in a vacant block is a great flowering of the South African Amaryllis belladonna,

cheers
fermi

Ah, to have such lovely weeds!


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 02/21/2012 - 18:01

It looks like we may actually get some winter this coming week.  I guess this would be the start of it: last night about 3 inches or so of wet snow.

Unlike many (most?) Euonymus, this one holds its fruit all winter.
    Euonomys bungeana 'Pink Lady'

       

Thuja occidentalis 'Pumila Sudworth' on the left, and Pinus ponderosa.  The Ponderosa pine is from the Black Hills disjunct population's seed.

       

The Wintergold White pine (Pinus strobus 'Wintergold') continues to delight.

       


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 02/21/2012 - 18:15

Neither Carex nigra (Black Sedge) or Fibigia clypeata have been discovered by birds...yet.

       

The Amur chokecherry (Prunus maackii) displays well against the white background.

             

The Chinese Dragon spruce (Picea asperata) demonstrates its rubbery branches, only slightly weighted by small snowfall.  Also shown is its normal summer habit for contrast.

       


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 02/26/2012 - 09:36

At home from the wintery mountain landscape (Rick, still winter at your place?)

   

- and back to spring! This morning was very promising although the temperature dropped barely into the freezing regime the sky was clear blue without any clouds. However it didn't last - when I went out to take some pictures the sun hid itself behind a thick layer of clouds suddenly appearing from nowhere. The weather has cleared a bit now some hours later but the sun is setting fast. The air is warmer too so no frost tonight.

Crocus tomasinianus is among the first bulbs to flower and almost as early as the snowdrops and snowflakes.
           

C baytopiorum is early too and a lot of others will follow soon - with a little more sun in the afternoon (my garden faces west).

       


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 02/26/2012 - 10:00

Beautiful pictures, Trond!  (It would be nice to experience one of those zone 8 "winters"  ;D ;D - quite a difference from here where we are again under a fresh snowfall!)   The blue crocus is really special.  I guess I need to start trying some bulbs from seed, as it doesn't seem that bulbs are very available around here for anything but the mass-produced crocus varieties.  How long ago did you start planting?


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 02/26/2012 - 10:09

Lori wrote:

Beautiful pictures, Trond!  (And you keep trying to convince us that you live in a place that has real winters... ppffftt!  ;D ;D)   The blue crocus is really special.  I guess I need to start trying some bulbs from seed, as it doesn't seem that bulbs are very available around here for anything but the mass-produced crocus varieties.  How long ago did you start planting?

Lori, thank you! The pictures aren't quite good - my camera has a damaged lens. A new lens costs the same as a new camera :-\
I started planting when I bought this property about 25 years ago but the C tomasinianus has really started spreading the last few years. Now I get 1000 new seedlings every year. If want to try sowing I can collect seeds.

The special blue one is C baytopiorum. Haven't seen seedlings of it yet.


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 02/26/2012 - 11:48

Really nice, Trond! I like the image of the Galanthus, especially.. great to see those swathes of flowers.. as Lori  mentioned, all white here, about 15cm of new snow at leastin the last day and a half (and a few recent snowfalls before that), and I'm not sure its done yet, though sun is out a bit.. high of -12 for today, -27C tonight, -20's next couple of nights, though temps will go up (and down, and up) after today.. spring is still a distant idea...

Are these Crocus patches in your woodland? How much sun do they get and what grows there later?


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 02/26/2012 - 17:32

Hoy wrote:

(Rick, still winter at your place?)

The snow that fell to make my last pretty photos is half gone.  A week ago they were predicting a 6 inch snowfall for today, then the "storm" was downgraded, and downgraded, and downgraded.  Today we receive a trace of precipitation.  :(  More snow is in line for Tuesday-Wednesday, 6-10 inches, but I am not holding my breath.  We have been in a drought since the first of September. 

Trond, you do have nice crocus lawns!  I remember admiring them last season, too.


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 02/27/2012 - 12:58

Thanks, Rick!

cohan wrote:

Really nice, Trond! I like the image of the Galanthus, especially.. great to see those swathes of flowers.. as Lori  mentioned, all white here, about 15cm of new snow at leastin the last day and a half (and a few recent snowfalls before that), and I'm not sure its done yet, though sun is out a bit.. high of -12 for today, -27C tonight, -20's next couple of nights, though temps will go up (and down, and up) after today.. spring is still a distant idea...

Are these Crocus patches in your woodland? How much sun do they get and what grows there later?

Cohan, you can call it patches in the woodland! Actually it is my one and only lawn situated between the "woods" and shrubbery at the forest edges. It is a very steep bank and difficult to mow anyway. From late February the spot gets some sunshine in the afternoon just before the sun sets. Later it has more direct sun from about 2PM till sunset. Crocus tomasinianus seems very shade tolerant and I find flowering specimens all over the place, even in dense shade beneath shrubs and on the north side of the house. I believe the seeds are transported by ants as the seedlings pop up in crevices a long way from the source.

Later it is some grass growing there in between the weeds ;) I don't mow till all the bulb leaves are wilted.


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 02/29/2012 - 22:58

Tks, Trond, I'll have to try to keep that species in mind if it's shade tolerant.. my full sun spots are limited and have a lot of things to compete for them... I have lots of part day sun areas...


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 03/02/2012 - 14:23

Here are some of the colour forms of Crocus tommasinianus (and some others hiding between them - all are selfseeded here). Nice sun here today, had coffee in the garden after dinner ;D

           

           


Submitted by Mark McD on Sat, 03/03/2012 - 06:38

Great looking crocus explosion there Trond!  Nice to have so many lovely clumps of Crocus seeding around and naturalizing in the garden. 

After January-February being virtually snowless here, and unusually mild too, several crocus species started to flower mid February, including chrysanthus cultivars, the earliest bloom ever in my garden after 25 years.  But with the arrival of March, snow also arrived, nearly a foot of snow yesterday, couple more inches heavy wet snow and ice last night.


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 03/03/2012 - 20:27

Nice range of colours in those Crocuses, Trond.

Mark, the snow may not be so good for the Crocuses, but I bet its good for moisture levels...


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 03/04/2012 - 17:43

No crocus here, unless you buy a pot at the florist!

Philadelphus- almost as much white as when its in full bloom... one plus: twigs don't seem to be juicey enough to tempt moose...

unlike the apples and crabs- pruned by me a couple years back, then the new growth has been eaten by moose ever since-- guess next year will need some wire or net...

Garden would be a strong word here- looking from the edge of the woods, toward the 'yard' open areas in view are mowed in summer, some planted shrubs etc, other shrubs and  trees wild natives...


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 03/04/2012 - 19:40

cohan wrote:

Philadelphus- ... one plus: twigs don't seem to be juicey enough to tempt moose...

Never thought about that before, but now that you say it, Cohan, those twigs are one of the driest and seemingly least nutritious.  They certainly would have me gagging (!)


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 03/04/2012 - 21:00

RickR wrote:

cohan wrote:

Philadelphus- ... one plus: twigs don't seem to be juicey enough to tempt moose...

Never thought about that before, but now that you say it, Cohan, those twigs are one of the driest and seemingly least nutritious.  They certainly would have me gagging (!)

I hadn't thought about it either till I saw them completely untouched right next to the apples stripped right back to woody branches! Also noticed one of our wild saskatoons (Amelanchier alnifolius) another moose/deer fave- there is one that's really a kind of bonsai- about 6-7 feet tall, with no branches more than a foot away from the stem.... they have to be able to get some height when they can, and then tall stems can grow freely, but lower stuff all gets heavily pruned...


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 03/04/2012 - 22:19

I am sure any fruit wood will have an irresistible fragrance.  Anything belonging to Hamamelidaceae is a perennial favorite, too.  The American witchhazel is very rare in Minnesota and I have been to one of the colonies.  They are all "ancient" plants there, at least 30-40 years old with aged multiple trunks 2-4 inches in diameter.  Every plant desperately resprouts from the base each year, only to be feasted upon by deer.  And no wonder that there is no regeneration.


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 03/04/2012 - 23:09

No witchazels here ( I may have seeds in somewhere, no seedlings though, I don't think...) any Rosaceae without thorns is fair game (our discussion of Sorbus somewhere on the forum...) but willows and poplars are also very popular, probably the small birches  and alders as well-- the moose spend more time in those wet shrublands  than anything, around here... the open woods are also full of tall poplar saplings which are broken at 7-9feet (maybe less?I'd have to pay attention) where the moose have purposely broken them so they can reach the tender branch tips which are only near the top..
Generally its not a problem, especially for the native shrubs and trees-- there are abundant semi/natural areas, so numbers of native shrubs are high enough they are not that adversely affected (i.e. they can flower and fruit, though not get as tall as they might! browsing is mostly in winter), though exotics may not be as well adapted (apples!)..

I visited a natural area to the west of here, and noticed all the Amelanchier and some other things were browsed to just a couple of feet above the ground...


Submitted by Fermi on Mon, 03/05/2012 - 00:43

Rain during the last week has brought about another explosion of Habranthus and Zephyranthes and spurred on more Lycoris!
Zephyranthes "Grandjax"

Zephyranthes "Ajax"

Zephyranthes candida

Lycoris elsae

Rhodophiala bifida

cheers
fermi


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Mon, 03/05/2012 - 04:36

We have just put a fence around the garden to keep the dog in and the rabbits out, but oh I would have real problems if we had moose around (!), the garden is full of fruit trees, let alone all the other woody plants it sounds they love. I know a few people who have trouble with deer, and such wildlife must have a big impact on how the garden can develop. (When we were infested with rabbits I did a detailed survey day by day of their activities, which curiously enabled me to tolerate them somewhat better!).

To provide a little spring cheer, the bright Eranthis 'Guinea Gold'. This sterile so one doesn't get the widespread drifts of the species which can seed very well in favoured gardens.


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Mon, 03/05/2012 - 04:40

Like the Zephyranthes Fermi - only candida is really hardy here - and the Rhodophiala is very nice and free flowering; I hope my plant will do this in the summer.


Submitted by Steve Newall on Mon, 03/05/2012 - 11:56

Tim wrote:

We have just put a fence around the garden to keep the dog in and the rabbits out

6 months ago I put up a rabbit fence which needed 400m of rabbit netting . I built it around a rabbit and it's still in here despite my best efforts .


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Mon, 03/05/2012 - 16:42

Oh I love it! They really are pesky creatures. A few years ago I found a nest (if that's the right word) of tiny rabbits in a large pile of shreddings, so I hope you only have the one in the garden!


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 03/05/2012 - 18:05

I find a nest in my yard most years.  Fortunately, I have always discover them before the babies get too big to catch.  Rabbits love witchhazel too, and the really love sassafras.

Jandals, have you tried a cut apple to bait them?


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 03/06/2012 - 09:30

I'm glad to say I have no rabbits! (The slugs are out BTW and have started destroying some of the early plants >:( )

At my mountain cabin we have European elks (and some stray sheep) and at my summerhouse we have deer and sheep. Small rodents are everywhere of course.

It's as you say, Cohan, the Philadelphus is never scratched by any critter nor broken by heavy snow!

Nice bulbs, jandals Fermi! I'm sorry I can't grow them outside here - I assume. . . . .


Submitted by Steve Newall on Tue, 03/06/2012 - 11:59

RickR wrote:

Jandals, have you tried a cut apple to bait them?

Not yet Rick but I will do when all the seeds are done . Winter is the best time to try food based traps . Will keep you updated and thanks for the tip

Trond - It's Fermi who grows all the lovely bulbs but I know that you knew that


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 03/06/2012 - 13:02

Jandals wrote:

RickR wrote:

Jandals, have you tried a cut apple to bait them?

Not yet Rick but I will do when all the seeds are done . Winter is the best time to try food based traps . Will keep you updated and thanks for the tip

Trond - It's Fermi who grows all the lovely bulbs but I know that you knew that

Oh yes, of course :-[  . . . I was a little too quick there, Steve!


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 03/06/2012 - 15:06

Fermi wrote:

cohan wrote:

Nice flowers, Fermi and Tim!

Still growing only snowbanks here! ( http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=930.msg15658#msg15658 )

Here's the mock orange/Philadelphus again.... amazing how much snow those thin branches can hold! followed by Lilac/Syringa and an apple/Malus

Amazing, Cohan,
reminds me of the soap suds scene from "The Party"!
cheers
fermi

True! though soap suds wouldn't be as heavy! Right now I feel like I'm living on a bob-sled site...lol plus the sun is out, so quite blinding!


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 03/13/2012 - 13:34

Some pictures from today's walk. It is mild but cloudy as it has been for several days now. On the other "side" of the country (along Oslofjorden) they have started planting salads and other vegetables outside now but farther north they still have snowstorms!

I have planted several forms of Corydalis solida in my woodland. The earlier have bloomed for some weeks now! The very first rhododendron is Rh dauricum(??). It set off in early February but was damaged by a spell of frost. Another early is Rh moupinense. I think the flowers unfurl tomorrow! Also Hepatica transsilvanica is in flower now. Thisone has a lot of flowers but they are far apart! One plant covers about 1 sq meter!


Submitted by AmyO on Wed, 03/14/2012 - 07:24

Looking for signs of spring yesterday and this is what I found. Not much, but it keep my hopes up that most things have made it through this freakish winter!
1-Corydalis solida...a pale lavender one from a gardener in MA who sells divisions of her garden plants in her front yard to raise funds for local charities. Some of her plants are quite rare such as the double bloodroot, Trillium of all sorts and many others for extremely low prices! Needless to say I visit her yard every spring!
2-Cyclamen coum...From Brent & Becky's Bulbs in Virginia. Stopped by there last March on a nursery tour down the east coast. Their tubers are huge!!
3-Another C. coum from the 2010 seedex, just about in bloom!
4-The first snowdrop to bloom for me this year!!
5-Helleborus niger 'Josef Lemper' purchased at Pine Knot Farms last March. This has had buds above ground since last December.


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 03/14/2012 - 17:39

Nice to see flowers and shoots, Trond and Amy!
My young C solida flowered in May last year, so some time to wait yet.. all my 'spring' plantings are still one or two feet under snow...


Submitted by WimB on Thu, 03/15/2012 - 13:32

Today, these two flowers really caught my eye in the garden!

Pulsatilla vulgaris subsp. grandis (a seedling of the Budapest strain....the real P. vulgaris 'Budapest' doesn't exist anymore, which is a real shame)
and Scilla armena with it's intense blue flower!


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Tue, 03/20/2012 - 03:21

The pulsatilla is exquisite! None of ours are flowering yet but the buds showing promise. A lot of early woodlanders are flowering with us, including Hacquetia epipactis 'Thor', Helleborus odorus and Primula 'Gigha'.


Submitted by Palustris on Tue, 03/20/2012 - 14:54

Thought you might like a quick tour of the greenhouse with a few of the plants on show.

From the door

Propagating Frame.

From the door

From the door.

Anemonella thalictroides

Corydalis solida George Baker

Dianthus arvernensis

Primula allionii Broadwell Milkmaid

Primula allionii GFS 1984

Primula allionii Hemswell Ember

Primula allionii Lindum Eros

Primula allionii Lindum Wedgewood

Primula allionii Malcom’s Mate

Primula allionii Pink Ice

Primula allionii Rachel Kinnon

Primula allionii seedling

Primula allionii Stradbrooke Dream

Primula allionii Tony(?)

Primula allionii unknown

Primula allionii unknown

Primula allionii Wharefedale Ling

Primula Boothman’s Variety

Primula Hall Barn Blue.
There are more plants, but not in flower yet and the Primula allionii are no where near as good as the ones on the show benches, but I am just pleased to have kept them alive for another season.


Submitted by Lockwood on Tue, 03/20/2012 - 21:07

Palustris wrote:

Thought you might like a quick tour of the greenhouse with a few of the plants on show.
There are more plants, but not in flower yet and the Primula allionii are no where near as good as the ones on the show benches, but I am just pleased to have kept them alive for another season.

Thank you for sharing Palustris.  Your greenhouse is nice and tidy.  The plants are all gorgeous!  I really like Primula allionii Malcom’s Mate just solid blooms.   8)

Stunning pulsatilla too!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Wed, 03/21/2012 - 18:44

The crazy northeastern weather continues.  Plants seem almost a month ahead.  The Everett, Wa NARGS Meeting was great but cold.  It was warmer at home!
The daffodil is usually 2nd week in April and the douglasia the 3rd or 4th week, yet  here they are.


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 03/21/2012 - 20:09

Very nice flowers, Wim and Tim!  
You have so many wonderful things in your greenhouse, Palustris!  

Well, it looks like we will have flowers before the end of March after all... Bulbocodium vernum emerging:

Wow, the start of the alpine season there already, Anne!


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 03/23/2012 - 12:30

Palustris - you have some really nice primulas!

Yesterday and today we have had sun and the temperature reached 14C! We have not seen that since December!

Cardamine enneaphylla has been out in several weeks already but today they stretched their legs substantially! Also the daffodils (probably 'Tête à Tête') and Narcissus cyclamineus opened fully - notice the slug damage of some of the flowers :(

       

The lungworts also come forth in strides now! And for the first time in my garden - Pteridophyllum racemosum in flower! I managed to get hold of some plants last year ;D ;D

       


Submitted by Weiser on Fri, 03/23/2012 - 15:46

A month ahead in Reno! ;D

Viola beckwithii
[attach thumb=1]

Ranunculus glaberrimus var. glaberrimus
[attach thumb=2]

Fritillaria pudica


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Sat, 03/24/2012 - 03:07

It is wonderful how varied gardens are - we have had exceptionally sunny and dry weather this spring, but with hosepipe bans to come because of similarly very dry weather last year when ground water levels are normally replenished. So in fact the alpines come more into their own in the garden because they are more easily looked after where other plants might struggle.

I grow many alpines in a railway sleeper raised bed (ca. 16 x 8 ft) which was made probably around 12 years ago and has had several major replantings. This one is the latest after it had become rather overgrown and weedy and certain plants had become too vigorous. Slowly I am learning to grow smaller plants on it and regular tidying and topdressing each year keeps it looking good.

Will I be able to succeed with that wonderful Alkanna on the bed? Time will tell, but it is planted in a section that is virtually pure grit and other choice species like Campanula zoysii are growing next to it, so given winter protection I have high hopes it might do. It would be wonderful to try that Viola beckwithii of John's too...


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 03/24/2012 - 12:01

So many delights :)

No snowdrops here, yet, still just snowflakes ;) We had another 8-10cm of snow the other day, and around -16C last night.. we'll be back up to +11 by wednesday....
Here I am after shovelling, maintaining, as always, the highest standards of fashion, even when there is no one to see! and a chipper attitude in the face of back breaking (or knee/arm breaking- one fall on the abundant ice under the new snow!), then my (mostly under construction) main rock garden area, and my new Sempervivum bed from last fall, which is in front of the house..


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 03/24/2012 - 12:47

cohan wrote:

Here I am after shovelling, maintaining, as always, the highest standards of fashion, even when there is no one to see!

Well, yes, that is the essence of style isn't it?  Maintaining decorum even when out of the glow of the paparazzi's flash bulbs.  ;D I share your attention to fashion as I pot on seedlings indoors here - only the most elegant of sweatpants and t-shirts, artistically daubed with accents of cat hair and dirt.  ;D ;D


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Sat, 03/24/2012 - 13:30

Cohan - do you have as many words for snow as the Inuit? The famous UK gardener Christopher Lloyd was renowned for his complete lack of style; he hardly needed it because he made a fabulous garden!


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 03/24/2012 - 16:05

We didn't get as much as Cohan did.  Despite that minor setback (and there'll be a lot more snow before it's done  :rolleyes:), there are signs of spring all over the yard:

Buds developing on Thlaspi kurdicum; foliage on Primula algida; Jovibarba arenaria and Saxifraga cuneifolia; Primula cv.:
     

Buds developing on Saxifraga sancta var. macedonica, and some rosettes nipped off by jackrabbits; Pyrrocoma uniflora; Erigeron trifidus(?) (bought as Anacyclus marrocanus); Primula elatior; Townsendia parryi; Synthyris platycarpa:
         


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 03/24/2012 - 23:46

Lori and Tim- it's  a tidier looking outfit- at least the bottom half- since I wasn't planning to shovel at first, and so I didn't put on my 'work' pants which get rapidly dirty handling logs/firewood in the bush! These are sweatpants mostly reserved for lounging indoors...lol

Tim- our language for snow is sadly lacking (at least words in general use- they may exist in scholarly writing??) though I can certainly recognise many many types and conditions of snow, and have often judged temperature by the condition of snow on the road....

Lori- lots of plants to look at there! I just noticed tonight that one corner of the semp bed is showing ( I think, it was dark out)- the sun is powerful this time of year, melting where anything dark is on or through the snow, even when temperatures are barely above (or even below) freezing! Until that, my only plants showing were my cactus seedlings... 7C for tomorrow, then we have snow forecast again Mon and Tues, but after that, up to 11C..


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 11:42

First greenhouse flowers of 2012 - the wonderfully bizarre water hawthorn, Aponogeton distachyos- these flowers were cut and brought inside to better enjoy the vanilla/gardenia scent.

       


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 13:32

I didn't know you had a greenhouse, Lori.  Too small for all your seedling, I suppose...

Bizarre certainly is beautiful!
--------------------------------
Ptilostemon afer: March 19th and March 25th.

       


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 13:43

Really pretty, Lori, they remind me of something- maybe I've seen a picture before....

Rick, things are rolling along!
I'm going out to do some chores now- supposed to get up to 7C as I said, but at noon in Rocky Mtn House, it was still -5, and windy.. have to look at that semp bed and see what's showing...


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 14:02

RickR wrote:

I didn't know you had a greenhouse, Lori.  Too small for all your seedling, I suppose...

No, amply large (10'x20') but Stuart uses it for his above-ground water lily ponds and tender roses and I don't want to interfere.  (it's enough that I've taken over the entire rest of the yard!  :rolleyes:)

Wow, Ptilostemon afer looks spectacular!
http://www.greekmountainflora.info/Parnon/slides/Ptilostemon%20afer%20Pa...


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 19:35

Your rolling eyes doesn't compute with me...
My yard is all for me, I still have seeds all over the house, my refrigerator is more than half full of overwintering plants, cuttings and seeds stratifying, and I have a potting table set up in the living room!
There are advantages to being single.  ;D
-------------------
Gee, it had never crossed my mind before, but from that pic, Lori, it looks like the Ptilostemon would make a good dried flower.

Similar to Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum)

             


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 20:29

Forsythia mandshurica 'Vermont Sun' blooms two weeks earlier than F. x intermedia cultivars.  Actually, it is already done now...

             

Adonis 'Fukujukai'

       

A plain ol' Corydalis solida, but very pretty anyway.

             

Cornus mas has lost its petals, but it's still nice looking, too.

             

Hieracium villosum is interesting anytime of year.

             


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 20:55

Rick's C solida is a little ahead of mine-- here's a shot from today of the planting area where I have some- they are about 4 feet farther than the stick you see sticking up out of the snow...
Second shot is another bed- just between the shrubs and the posts (stuck into the snow to keep shovels and snowplows away from the beds). this is where I wait for Pulsatillas, Muscari, etc...


Submitted by Mark McD on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 21:20

cohan wrote:

Rick's C solida is a little ahead of mine-- here's a shot from today of the planting area where I have some- they are about 4 feet farther than the stick you see sticking up out of the snow...
Second shot is another bed- just between the shrubs and the posts (stuck into the snow to keep shovels and snowplows away from the beds). this is where I wait for Pulsatillas, Muscari, etc...

;D


Submitted by Mark McD on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 21:41

Good stuff there Rick, I see that you're experiencing the same early spring we are here.  Interesting about Forsythia mandshurica, being an early flowering variety.  Even though common and ubiquetously planted, I do love Forsythia.  I don't have any in my yard, but that's okay because they're in everyone else's yard, and I get to see them everywhere.  Need to rectify the situation, and plant some of the different varieties; really like those that have deeper gold color flowers.  The Adonis is most cheerful, can't believe I don't have any adonis in my garden.


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 22:19

F. mandshurica 'Vermont Sun' flowers are twice as large as those of F. x intermedia cvs.  Lighter yellow, not gold.  I am not sure how or if it differs from the species.    But it is a very tidy shrub in comparison to most unruly forsythias, and with oval leaves, not at all narrow or pointed. 


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 03/25/2012 - 22:48

I have fond memories of Forsythia from seeing it -esp in charmingly overgrown plantings in the yards of Victorian houses- in Toronto; I had thought they weren't hardy here, but have seen a couple growing happily in the town where I work.-- on the south sides of buildings, I think.. I'd like to try some if I can find seed/the right varieties :)


Submitted by WimB on Mon, 03/26/2012 - 08:32

Spring really has started over here, with temps up to 18°C and constant sun, flowers are popping up everywhere:

Olsynium douglasii 'Album'
Saxifraga wendelboi
Ranunculus ficaria 'Salad Bowl'
Anemone blanda
Primula 'Aire Waves'
Pulsatilla vulgaris 'Papageno'
Veronica thessalica
Ranunculus alpestris
Soldanella carpatica 'Alba'
Morisia monanthos


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 03/26/2012 - 20:24

I grew a seedling Pulsatilla Papageno once.  Frankly, I couldn't figure out why people liked it.  Flowers had very asymmetrically divide, sparse petals and were very ragged looking.  Yours, Wim, looks nice.  I love all of those creeping veronicas, too.

Cohan, I have found Forsythia mandshurica to be more cold hardy than even Forsythia x intermedia 'Northern Sun', which is a University of Minnesota introduction, and much touted here. 

I have been going through some of my flats of miscellaneous potted materials.  They are all much farther ahead of plants in the ground.  And I came across this surprise:

             

Clematis ochotensis from wild seed collected in Japan.  I planted the seed back in 2009 and only one sprouted, so I didn't transplant it.  The clematis grew about a foot last season, but died back to what you see.  I never realized it would be such an early bloomer!

You can also see a bunch more seedlings that came up two years later (in 2011) in the pot.  There ya go, Lori: another example for keeping "dead" pots.  But, you probably would have been smart enough to use GA3 in the first place. ;D


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 03/26/2012 - 20:41

RickR wrote:

You can also see a bunch more seedlings that came up two years later (in 2011) in the pot.  There ya go, Lori: another example for keeping "dead" pots.  But, you probably would have been smart enough to use GA3 in the first place. ;D

You greatly overestimate me :o... I often do things in the most inefficient way possible!  :D  Great example of delayed germination, though.


Submitted by cohan on Mon, 03/26/2012 - 23:47

RickR wrote:

Cohan, I have found Forsythia mandshurica to be more cold hardy than even Forsythia x intermedia 'Northern Sun', which is a University of Minnesota introduction, and much touted here. 

I'll try to remember that.. I have no idea what the ones are that I saw locally.. I don't usually look at woodies in local nurseries- usually can't afford any  ;D so I mostly  see the woodies they stick out front or featured in seasonal offerings at supermarkets, home stores etc, and haven't seen any Forsythias at all among those...
I don't recall seeing seed offered either, is it short-lived?


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 03/27/2012 - 06:27

I have some locally-published books that claim Forsythia ovata is the one that tends to get planted around here.  The flower buds can be winter-killed in low snowfall years.


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 03/27/2012 - 08:46

For forsythia, flower buds are often killed above the snowline here in less cold hardy cultivars.  I have grow Vermont Sun since 2001 and it has never skipped a beat, even in years with little snow.  It stays around 6ft high.  Flower buds above the snowline are hardy to at least -37F (-38C).  That's the coldest it has been here in those years.  There has been at least two springs in that time frame when the Northern Sun shrubs at the Arboretum (9 miles away) have had very significant flower bud damage.  I have never seen F. mandshurica offered for sale at local nurseries, only mail order.  Mine does not set seed.  :(

A pic of Vermont Sun from 2003:

             


Submitted by WimB on Tue, 03/27/2012 - 08:58

RickR wrote:

I have been going through some of my flats of miscellaneous potted materials.  They are all much farther ahead of plants in the ground.  And I came across this surprise:

Clematis ochotensis from wild seed collected in Japan.  I planted the seed back in 2009 and only one sprouted, so I didn't transplant it.  The clematis grew about a foot last season, but died back to what you see.  I never realized it would be such an early bloomer!

You can also see a bunch more seedlings that came up two years later (in 2011) in the pot.  There ya go, Lori: another example for keeping "dead" pots.  But, you probably would have been smart enough to use GA3 in the first place. ;D

Wonderful, Rick. Didn't know that one...looks very nice!


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 03/27/2012 - 11:25

Maybe sometime if I have a chance I'll try to take a closer look at the Forsythias in town- I've only seen them from the car driving past! I think both I saw were planted in front of businesses (maybe one was a church..).. of course they are in town, so that gives them an advantage already over here, though one local gardener claimed that my 20 miles east of Rocky Mountain House (on the edge of foothills biome and weather) gives me a 2 week frost advantage, and my sheltered property can be kind to woodies..

Now I'll have to look around for them...


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 03/27/2012 - 12:48

cohan wrote:

RickR wrote:

Cohan, I have found Forsythia mandshurica to be more cold hardy than even Forsythia x intermedia 'Northern Sun', which is a University of Minnesota introduction, and much touted here. 

I'll try to remember that.. I have no idea what the ones are that I saw locally.. I don't usually look at woodies in local nurseries- usually can't afford any  ;D so I mostly  see the woodies they stick out front or featured in seasonal offerings at supermarkets, home stores etc, and haven't seen any Forsythias at all among those...
I don't recall seeing seed offered either, is it short-lived?

Cohan, Forsythia is extremely easy to root by cuttings! Almost any little piece of a twig will root without treatment of any kind.

Rick, ochotensis looks similar to koreana but is possibly much earlier in bloom?

Wim, some nice spring stuff there! BTW today I spotted the first patches of flowering wood anemones (Anemone nemorosa) along the road. I have had some flowering in my garden for a week. It is not the first spring flower though, the coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara) has been in bloom some time now.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Tue, 03/27/2012 - 14:19

When we bought our house there was a great deal of forsythia planted too close to the house.  It was removed and every place I dropped a branch there would soon be a new plant.  Our wind chill can make us much colder than the surrounding area and a number of times there were no flowers above the snow line.  It looks cheery at a distance early in the spring.


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 03/28/2012 - 11:25

cohan wrote:

Good to know cuttings will root.. in case I ever have a chance to get any :)

Is it impossible to send cuttings in the mail to Canada?


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 04/01/2012 - 13:49

More signs of life...
Corydalis nobilis; Taraxacum pseudoroseum; Lewisia glandulosa; Eritrichium pauciflorium ssp. sajanense:
     

This tiny nub is what I bought as "Rhodiola rosea/purpurea" a few years ago; however, it's a tiny thing that looks and acts differently than my old Rhodiola rosea (e.g. it goes dormant in summer), so I'm wondering if it is actually another species:

Winter colour on Vitaliana primuliflora v. cinerea (with Genista delphinensis in foreground):


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 04/01/2012 - 21:47

A close-up that probably explains why it's called Lewisia glandulosa:

Edit:  I picked up B. LeRoy Davidson's Lewisias at the WSW in Everett, Washington and have been perusing this excellent reference. Davidson makes note of the glands lining the edges of the bracts on the flower stem and on the sepals.  I'll have to remember to look closely when it blooms later on. 


Submitted by externmed on Mon, 04/02/2012 - 01:46

April 1, 2012 NE Massachusetts USA zone 5b to 7a {depending} (3rd "season" in the garden, Galanthus and Crocus gone)
Charles Swanson


Submitted by externmed on Mon, 04/02/2012 - 10:10

Hi Lori, all,
The Corydalis (solida) came from a small local nursery - no info.  The winter has been absurdly warm, but just dropped to normal in the last 10 days.  I don't recall the Corydalis being that red in previous seasons, the return of temps in the uppers 20s F after 60s - 80F may have done it.  This Towndendia was showing buds as soon as winter broke, rothrockii wasn't; and is just in the earliest stages of opening.  If we have a "normal" winter again, may be a month later for both.
Charles Swanson NE MA USA Z -- whatever

In spite of warnings from Lithuanian Rare Bulb Garden, this bed does show signs of "turning into a vast Corydalis plantation", and I'm not upset.  They evaporate very early.  Nothing else that I've ever planted (and wanted) tries to sprout every seed--seemingly more seeds than I ever see on the plants.    


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 04/03/2012 - 11:47

Charles- great colour on that Corydalis! I have one small planting, plus seedlings in pots- and I hope they spread!

Lori- much farther ahead than me, not surprisingly... I'm just happy to have a few areas showing out of the snow  ;D
The only real activity shown so far are a few semps/jovis- amazingly after only being out of the snow a week or so (and fresh snow half the nights) there are signs that some are awake at the highest parts of the bed/first to melt out.. This bed is almost all plants received as 'lost label' from a serious grower, so if she couldn't/wouldn't name them, I wont! But this is clearly enough Jovibarba globifera, prob ssp hirta, two shots taken 4 days apart, March 28 and April 01..


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 04/03/2012 - 15:25

Spending a week in the mountains but we had to drive some km to find snow even at 1100m altitude. Like last year much of the snow had gone and the remaining hardfrozen like ice due to very cold weather the last days. This spring has been rather dry up here 1.5cm of precipitation in 2 months.


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 04/03/2012 - 21:40

externmed wrote:

April 1, 2012 NE Massachusetts USA zone 5b to 7a (3rd "season" in the garden, Galanthus and Crocus gone)
Charles Swanson

Wonderful photos Charles.  My Townsendia rockrothii suffered from the early heat wave, and the flowers didn't open properly, the petals looking cut off and underdeveloped or altogether missing.  It has been is a state of pseudo-bloom for weeks.


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 04/04/2012 - 00:09

Nice images, Trond- not too different from the amount of snow here- though instead of the deepest snow being on high spots, its in the shade, and low areas, but we also have a lot of standing water now- one of my favourite times of year visually, since we suddenly have ponds and streams everywhere, and no grass to obscure them...


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 04/04/2012 - 17:08

Looks like spring is (was?) well under way for you, Palustris :) Looks like a great large garden, with lots of different kinds of planting areas!
I'm pretty sure we went through this not long ago- but my memory is not working today...lol where are you and what is your first name?


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 04/06/2012 - 15:38

Very nice, Palustris!  Your greenhouse plants are just amazing!  I assume from your photos (the green lushness and beautiful buildings) that you are in the UK?  It would be helpful if you could add your location to your signature in "Profile"... (always nice to know where abouts the garden is.   :) )

More signs of life in the rock garden, as I wait for Wednesday's snow to melt:
Buds on Androsace carnea ssp. brigantiaca; buds also on Douglasia montana - some winter burn this year; Potentilla uniflora and buds on Androsace septentrionalis (a loose lanky form, not the compact beauties I see in the mountains here):

   

New leaves on Aquilegia laramiensis; Eriogonum caespitosum, bought from Beaver Creek last year, has come through well; Campanula orphanidea, from seed in 2010:
   

Buds on the most developed Pulsatilla I found on my little trek... dare I hope that this is one of the Pulsatilla patens I've planted?  (Could just be one of the many self-seeded Pulsatilla vulgaris though...)


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 04/07/2012 - 00:37

Always nice to see what have survived the winter. In fact, I miss that feeling of excitement to watch the snow recede and plants showing anew :D
Last year we discussed whether Dryas overwintered with green leaves. Well - here's the answer for this winter regarding D octopetala: (about 1000m altitude and very exposed site with little snow cover)


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 04/08/2012 - 14:13

Here's another photo of Dryas octopetala emerging from winter by Merlin:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=934.msg16427#msg16427

Lewisia longipetala, emerging:

It's probably just a passing anomaly, but this tiny Aciphylla simplex appears to be lifelike and pliable... will probably soon be dealt a death blow by a late hard freeze...

First buds on Hepatica transylvanica in my cold yard (I know that people in warmer parts of the city have had hepatica in bloom for some time already):


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 04/08/2012 - 22:56

Draba lasiocarpa and and the evergreen gold foliage of a creeping veronica.

       

Echium russicum and Fibigia eriocarpa.  I haven't seen this one bloom yet, and so far it looks just like Fibigia clypeata (maybe perhaps less ruffling of the foliage?).

       

Sanguinaria canadensis 'Multiplex' has lost its pink blush.  That's Fibigia clypeata in the right background.

             

Thermopsis fabacea is always an early sprout.  A purple Corydalis solida with Variegated Bulbous Oatgrass (Arrhenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum 'Variegatum') to the right.

       

And bless its little heart, a one year old Pulsatilla georgica seedling, blooming at just 2 inches. :o 8)

             


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 04/09/2012 - 02:03

Lori wrote:

Here's another photo of Dryas octopetala emerging from winter by Merlin:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=934.msg16427#msg16427

Lewisia longipetala, emerging:

It's probably just a passing anomaly, but this tiny Aciphylla simplex appears to be lifelike and pliable... will probably soon be dealt a death blow by a late hard freeze...

First buds on Hepatica transylvanica in my cold yard (I know that people in warmer parts of the city have had hepatica in bloom for some time already):

Not very long leaves, though on that longipetala  ;) Aciphylla is a genus I have tried several times but they are not fond ofwinter wet :(

RickR wrote:

Draba lasiocarpa and and the evergreen gold foliage of a creeping veronica.

Echium russicum and Fibigia eriocarpa.  I haven't seen this one bloom yet, and so far it looks just like Fibigia clypeata (maybe perhaps less ruffling of the foliage?).

Sanguinaria canadensis 'Multiplex' has lost its pink blush.  That's Fibigia clypeata in the right background.

Thermopsis fabacea is always an early sprout.  A purple Corydalis solida with Variegated Bulbous Oatgrass (Arrhenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum 'Variegatum') to the right.
And bless its little heart, a one year old Pulsatilla georgica seedling, blooming at just 2 inches. :o 8)

Some nice ones, Rick. Impressive Pulsatilla :o


Submitted by Palustris on Mon, 04/09/2012 - 08:35

Spiegel wrote:

Palustris, a very beautiful pulsatilla.  Do you know which one it is?

Not really, it has been suggested that it is a form of P. ambigua. All I can say is that it is slap bang in the middle of Pulsatilla rubra with deep red flowers, P. vulgaris with normal purple flowers and P. grandis with lilac coloured blooms. It is a self seeded one that is for sure.  I have a picture of it in flower for the first time in 2006.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 04/09/2012 - 09:24

Hoy wrote:

Lori wrote:

Lewisia longipetala, emerging:

Not very long leaves, though on that longipetala  ;)

Well, no, not on the mingy little specimens I grow!  ;D  I suspect "longipetala" refers to the petals though; Davidson in his Lewisias refers to them as "narrow, equal" and "starry, not oval", (in describing how it was differentiated from P. pygamaea); see L. longipetala in bloom below:


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 04/10/2012 - 11:06

Lori wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Lori wrote:

Lewisia longipetala, emerging:

Not very long leaves, though on that longipetala  ;)

Well, no, not on the mingy little specimens I grow!  ;D  I suspect "longipetala" refers to the petals though; Davidson in his Lewisias refers to them as "narrow, equal" and "starry, not oval", (in describing how it was differentiated from P. pygamaea); see below:

Yes, i suppose so! Anyway both are very cute. Would like to grow them both ;)


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 04/11/2012 - 10:56

Suddenly the sun broke through the cloud cover and the Anemone blanda and Chionodoxa opened their flowers. All the Scilla and Crocus are done but other small bulbs take over.
I got two pots of Trillium pusillum from a friend last year and one of them are due to flower! They all wait for a place in the garden.


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 04/11/2012 - 11:42

Congrats on some sunshine! I like the pink Anemone- it seems blue and yellow are more common for spring flowers, so pink is welcome :)

How small is the T pusillum?


Submitted by Schier on Wed, 04/11/2012 - 18:39

No photos from me as yet, won't be long though, I hope! Out checking on the garden areas today,the usual suspects are showing signs of life, the ever so hardy sedums, the plain old - plain old varieties, I don't think anything stops them, short of pulling them out. And many of the dianthus, and bergenia, perking up their "ears".  I stopped and checked on the crambe cordifolia I planted last year, wondering if it made it through the winter as it wasn't very large, but I see what looks to be at least a couple of reddish growing points on the exposed crown, naturally I was tempted to poke at them, but at the last minute I found some common sense and left them alone...


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 04/11/2012 - 18:56

Glad to hear of someone else growing Crambe cordifolia around here, Faith - it's a terrific plant!
I have been resisting tugging at things in the rock garden too.


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 04/11/2012 - 20:08

The small bulbs are starting to bloom in greater number now - crocus, chionodoxa, scilla - though no good shows yet. 
A couple of hepatica are starting to bloom today, though my camera didn't the colours correctly.  They are actually more of a deep purple-blue, especially the H. nobilis.
H. nobilis; H. transylvanica:
 


Submitted by cohan on Thu, 04/12/2012 - 00:11

Great Hepaticas, Lori :) Still no garden action here (really curious whether the forecast possible heavy rain- and snow- will speed things along at all, or just make us even soggier - we may be floating by the end..), but I did, to my surprise, see some Petasites in bud in the bush- just emerging from the water, only in one sheltered spot (that I saw, no doubt similar others) with snow still melting into the water just metres away..
more pics here:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=591.msg16594#msg16594


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 04/12/2012 - 13:21

cohan wrote:

Congrats on some sunshine! I like the pink Anemone- it seems blue and yellow are more common for spring flowers, so pink is welcome :)

How small is the T pusillum?

Had a couple hours of sun this evening too and the temp reached +12C.

I have planned to plant more of the pink anemone. It looks nice in the lawn.

My flowering T pusillum is 9.5cm tall and the leaves are 3cm long! Have about 10 nonflowering specimens of half that size too. Hopefully they flower next year.


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 04/12/2012 - 13:24

Lori, nice to see some hepaticas with flowers! My plants didn't flower much due to wet weather and slugs. Although they let the leaves alone they devour the petals.


Submitted by Mark McD on Thu, 04/12/2012 - 20:00

RickR wrote:

My Trillium pusillum hit the dust. 

Or, it's been sleeping for two years so far...

Two years ago I bought Trillium pusillum 'Road Runner', named for this selection's propensity for spreading quickly, I have seen some wonderful clumps of it in other gardens.  In my garden, it should be renamed 'Road Sleeper" as it has reduced in size and looks pathetic.  I suppose, the trick is to find the right spot.


Submitted by Boland on Fri, 04/13/2012 - 11:36

Guess I should be posting my current bloomers in this thread..I'll endevour to do this in the future.

I have never tried T. pusillum..for what its worth, most of the trillium I do have are just breaking the surface.


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 04/14/2012 - 00:48

Todd wrote:

These were a few shots taken in the garden today.

Well, Todd, I once wrote that I didn't dare planting Petasites in my garden but they certainly have some charm, at least frigidus. Maybe I have to change my attitude! ;)


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 04/14/2012 - 10:28

Petasites frigidus is very invasive... I tried it twice and yanked it out twice (gave it a second chance in case my invasiveness tolerance had changed, I guess).  Some of the cultivated ones are just as bad, from observation.  (I've never grown them, having enough invasive things to deal with.)


Submitted by Boland on Sat, 04/14/2012 - 15:14

That Petasites is indeed invasive...along with Podophyllum peltatum, I am constantly hacking them back.

Sunny but cool today (7 C).  Here's how things are progressing.


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 04/14/2012 - 18:50

I wouldn't put them next to anything delicate or rare, but both P frigidus palmatus and sagitattus (if, as I've said, its really accurate to distinguish the species- there are so many intermediate forms, I wouldn't be surprised if my whole region contains hybrids, or if its really one big messy species) are native here and even on my acreage, so I have no fear of them- though likely they behave differently in a cushy cultivated bed than in a more natural context which always includes many other plants... that said, I still plan a planting in the yard so I can enjoy them up close in spring! I can put them somewhere they can spread for a few metres, mixed with other native wetland plants- sagitattus, that is, palmatus is a woodland species here, and often doesn't flower, but has really lovely leaves... it grows even more spread out amongst other plants than sagitattus, but I'd like to try a mass of it, like a whole berm or something- I like the emerging leaves and fall leaves as well..

Todd, did you grow your albus from seed? I still haven't looked it up yet...lol


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 04/14/2012 - 21:44

Thank goodness for alpines- only thing showing signs of life in the garden besides weeds ;) and that with nightly frost, at least as low as -11C recently, and snow frequently, including snow/rain almost non-stop since Thurs afternoon... still, just noticed today a few subtle suggestions of growth to come! These are still small seedlings, second winter outside, but first in the ground in this new bed with semps, so I'm excited to see signs of life;
Saussurea here:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=676.msg16672#msg16672
Plus Waldheimia tomentosa just emerged, no more than an inch tall, my one and only seedling..

I was starting to wonder about the leaves which I have not seen any white on so far, but I found an image on Holubec's site that looks right- I guess its just a greener form...
http://holubec.wbs.cz/1Kunlun-Shan-Xinjiang.html?framebreaker
Potentilla nitida  I have several of these in different spots as well.. just waking up...(the other bed is snow covered again)


Submitted by Boland on Sun, 04/15/2012 - 05:05

Well at leats you can get P. nitida to survive....that is more than I can say!  However, my P. dickensii is just starting to unfurl a leaf so several of my plants are at the same stage as yours...just the bulbs are further advanced.

I goofed on the Petasites...the one I showed is P. japonicus, NOT P. albus.


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 04/15/2012 - 12:38

One thing is for sure, the landscape and climate that Holubec shows is very different from my place! Don't think I ever can grow anything from that place here!

Todd wrote:

I goofed on the Petasites...the one I showed is P. japonicus, NOT P. albus.

Todd, I am not the only one, seemingly ;)


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/15/2012 - 12:52

Todd-- good thing I didn't look it up yet, then  ;D
As for P nitida, we'll see longer term now that its in the ground- sure would love to see it flower :) There's a funny story there- I was sowing this and Paederota bonarota at the same time, and unknowingly sowed them both in one pot and left the other empty!! I realised eventually there were two kinds of seedlings and just left them like that...lol I have the Paederota planted out as well, no sign of that yet...

Trond, the Holubec collections are from a number of places, some dry but some not- there is a bit of description on the site, I haven't go them all sorted out in my mind... for sure the Sakhalin collections seem to be from a wet place, better for you... I still don't know how any dryland plants will do here, I think I need to site and plant carefully- my rainfall is not so high, but low temperatures mean less evaporation, and spring and fall can be wet.
Interesting about the Waldheimia, the site of Holubec's wild photo has a very similar mix of rock types to the natural glacial deposits in my area- field stones have a similar mix here (though more quartzite here) as does the road gravel- so that photo could have been in a rock garden here  ;D


Submitted by Boland on Sun, 04/15/2012 - 13:45

Anything from Sakhalin should do fine for both Trond and I.  It is a coolish, wet, windy area.  Hokkaido plants do wonderfully well in St. John's...sakhalin should be even better!  I didn't realize Holubec collected there.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 04/15/2012 - 15:44

Finally, we have a bit of sunshine today, though it's cold with the odd little patch of snow still around from yesterday.
Various seedling primroses, planted last year, are emerging, and P. algida (from 2 years ago) shows buds:

Sunny enough for crocus to open:
           


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/15/2012 - 15:54

Todd wrote:

Anything from Sakhalin should do fine for both Trond and I.  It is a coolish, wet, windy area.  Hokkaido plants do wonderfully well in St. John's...sakhalin should be even better!  I didn't realize Holubec collected there.

That's exactly what I was thinking :)And I think I might be able to grow some of those things too- a lot of my local woodland plants are species of 'moist woods'; Sakhalin was mentioned on Holubec's site this year, with one photo gallery from there; I don't remember if he did the collecting himself or that was one of the people that collect for him...


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/15/2012 - 17:53

Todd, I forgot to mention- the Pulmonaria montana is a very nice colour..

Lori- you're doing better than us- we didn't get any sun till late afternoon- if we broke freezing, just barely! Still lots of snow around from the other day (besides what was here before that!)


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Mon, 04/16/2012 - 14:37

This sand bed was started about three or four years ago, and recently extended at the front. It has been a great success  and is leading me to redesign and change some of the plantings in our front garden. These are just a couple of photos and the superb dianthus 'Conwy Star', bred at Aberconwy Nursery.


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 04/16/2012 - 20:06

Simply(?) fantastic, Tim! :o  Every plant has it place in the sun and ready for stardom.  Commanding agave looking plants.  (With my limited knowledge, I can at least see that the one on the right is one.)  I don't think I realized this before:  the cyclamen is growing in sand?


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Tue, 04/17/2012 - 03:39

Actually you should see the rest of the garden - not so neat! A lot of alpines lend themselves to this sort of planting (like a very big trough in effect), because you do tend to view them individually, but I like them best when they begin to merge and mix over time. Woodland plants are especially nice in spring just in foliage.


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 04/17/2012 - 12:56

Tim, your magnificent sandbed has made me planning one too ;) But I'll have to build it somewhat up from the ground. I know where to build it but not when yet . . . .


Submitted by Boland on Tue, 04/17/2012 - 17:47

Trond, the aizoides group Draba are easy in OUR climate...its the fuzzy ones that are challenging.  I love them for the early bloom and their form is quite lovely all summer.

We broke two temperature records today..the warmest day for this specific date (it reached 21 C) and the hottest temperature for this early in the season...we actually did not hit 20 C last year until July! (last year was one of the coldest summers on record).

Lots blooming now...the crocus and reticulated iris are at their peak, Chionodoxa and Scilla are starting nicely..I've seen daffodils open next to houses were it is sheltered.

A few recent bloomers..the Corydalis solida are just starting to colour up, the first Erythronium are open and my Viburnum bodnantense is also starting.


Submitted by Fermi on Tue, 04/17/2012 - 22:59

Wow, those viburnums! I've just bought tubestock of both and need to find the right place to plant them - Rick's suggestion of near the door is a great idea!
Our autumn continues dry here and the bulbs such as nerines are doing well;
in the garden, Nerine "Ariel"

In the shadehouse, "Aristocrat"

By the front door we have a rather spikey Hakea suavolens which is supposedly sweetly scented - just a bit risky to try to sniff it!

cheers
fermi


Submitted by Howey on Wed, 04/18/2012 - 05:16

Fermi - love that Hakea suavolens.  Does MAFF allow seed of it to leave the country?
Todd - Have had success with cuttings of Viburnum bodnantense in the University's misting bed but am still trying with V.carlesii.  Guess it has a lot to do with at what stage you take cuttings from the plants.  They are both prize plants.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Wed, 04/18/2012 - 12:50

Viburnum carlesii really is a great plant. We just have gap left by a specimen of Daphne bholua which died this winter, and this would make a good replacement. We actually have as spiky a plant as Fermi next to our front door - a Grevillea rosmarinifolia 'Williamsi' which I accidentally allowed to root through from the pot it was in. It flowers wonderfully but has to be curbed to allow visitors through!

I thought I would show a few examples of foliage of alpines since I find this as attractive as their flowers in many cases - these are Leucogynes leontopodium, Stachys candida, Potentilla ovina and Teucrium pyreniacum. The camera often picks up details that you don't notice in the garden.


Submitted by Boland on Wed, 04/18/2012 - 16:52

Many plants have foliage that certainly deserves a closer look.

I grow one nerine indoors...it won't bloom here until September.  It would be nice if it could be grown outside.

The hellebores are coming along nicely now.  Here is a selection of those I have in bloom.


Submitted by Fermi on Wed, 04/18/2012 - 22:05

Tim wrote:

We actually have as spiky a plant ...next to our front door - a Grevillea rosmarinifolia 'Williamsi' which I accidentally allowed to root through from the pot it was in. It flowers wonderfully but has to be curbed to allow visitors through!

What a coincidence, Tim, as that is why the Hakea is where it is - it rooted through its pot and the tray and into the soil. 15 months ago the wind ripped it down though it was still attached to the soil by a root. I chopped off its branches and stood it up again to ready it for disposal and the infernal thing just kept growing! These are the first flowers in 2 years though, so it obviously had to do a bit of re-establishing itself. Hopefully it will set seed so that I can re-establish it somewhere else - I've not found it for sale again since I bought this one a few years ago at an agricultural field day at Elmore.

A shrub I've come to appreciate for its drought-hardiness and prolific flowering is Eriocephalum africanus

I must remember to take cuttings at the right time in future!
cheers
fermi


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 04/18/2012 - 22:13

Tim wrote:

I thought I would show a few examples of foliage of alpines since I find this as attractive as their flowers in many cases - these are... Potentilla ovina... The camera often picks up details that you don't notice in the garden.

What odd foliage for a potentilla!


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 04/18/2012 - 22:59

Just a suggestion of things to come-- Corydalis solida buds, just barely showing among the leaf mulch.. and Primula, I think its an auricula cultivar- I planted two of them last summer, and one flowered in fall! Almost out of the snow, and looks like its ready to go.... I may be planting more of these (one is yellow, one violet) though none of the crazy ones...


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 04/19/2012 - 12:40

You guys show a wealth of interesting plants :o some of which I've never even heard of!
Here at my summerhouse it's not many interesting plants flowering at the moment as we have more summer flowers than spring flowers. Moreover, the geese have arrived and they graze everywhere. It's tracks of deer too.


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 04/19/2012 - 20:52

More signs of life...
Gentiana punctata; buds on Draba acaulis; Rheum rhizostachyum:
           

Corydalis solida x2; Adonis x amurensis 'Fukujukai', making an appearance; Jeffersonia dubia; Fritillaria pallidiflora:      
             


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Fri, 04/20/2012 - 01:08

Lori and Cohan - it is magical seeing all those plants just appearing through the ground, not too different to when seeds germinate. I don't think Draba acaulis is much in cultivation in the UK and most people grow these tomentose species in alpine houses - rather wonderful to see it in a garden setting. In a cool gritty spot I am trying this  x Leucoraoulia hybrid along with the exquisite New Zealand 'edleweiss' Leucogynes leontopodium. Our often hot dry summers will be the testing time but where they are planted moisture levels in the soil should remain high. In the same place is the unusual little umbel from South America Bolax gummifer, which i have not succeeded well with before.


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 04/20/2012 - 07:11

Nice to see things really gaining steam now, Lori.  There was that many stems on F. palliflora last season?  Do you expect more sprouts still to emerge?

The silvers that Lori and Tim show are so cute, intricate and robust.  (Each has its own aura ;D.)

More stuff in my garden:
Corydalis solida.  To the right is a bit of Arrhenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum 'Variegatum'.  Seed of this turned out to be crap last season (sorry, Stephen).  

             

Mertensia alpina

       

Astrantia major 'Sunningdale Gold' and Jovibarba heuffelii

       


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 04/20/2012 - 12:00

Love the Draba, Lori!
The stone behind the Gentiana looked like running water in the thumbnail, and I thought OMG, your run-off is even worse than mine, I just have trickles! lol Of course I'd love to have a real stream in the garden.....


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 04/20/2012 - 12:28

You definitly grow some gems, all of you!

I went for a walk today visiting some of the wild populations of Hepatica nobilis on the island where I have my summerhouse. The usual blue form dominate in all populations except two. One consists almost completely of red (pink Lori?) flowered specimens and in the other 30-40% are red (and a few white). However, you can find red ones here and there other places too.


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 04/20/2012 - 12:39

Hoy wrote:

You definitly grow some gems, all of you!

I went for a walk today visiting some of the wild populations of Hepatica nobilis on the island where I have my summerhouse. The usual blue form dominate in all populations except two. One consists almost completely of red (pink Lori?) flowered specimens and in the other 30-40% are red (and a few white). However, you can find red ones here and there other places too.

These are great, Trond- love the deep colours and pinks are very nice!

I just saw the first bulb emerging (apart from Cory I saw already a couple of days ago)! Probably a crocus... so far the first and only of the bulbs I planted last fall...lol


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 04/20/2012 - 13:26

RickR wrote:

Nice to see things really gaining steam now, Lori.  There was that many stems on F. palliflora last season?  Do you expect more sprouts still to emerge?

It looks like the same number of stems as last year - 2; more would be nice though, if that's what happens!  It's funny that I didn't even plant any F. pallidiflora out there... the bulbs may have been in the roots of a perennial that I moved.  If the bulbs had been mixed in with other bulbs being planted, you'd think we would have noticed (from the skunky smell, if not from the different appearance.)  The woody stems immediately behind the green shoots are some larger perennial that will emerge later.

Wow, just beautiful, Trond!  If I had hepatica like that in my woods (if I had woods  :rolleyes:), I don't think I'd even bother growing them in the yard!


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 04/20/2012 - 14:58

Lori wrote:

Wow, just beautiful, Trond!  If I had hepatica like that in my woods (if I had woods  :rolleyes:), I don't think I'd even bother growing them in the yard!

We have no formal yard or garden at our summerhouse but plant a lot of different plants to substitute those that the deer, hares, rodents and sheep devour ;)
It isn't our wood but belongs to the two closest neighbours 500m away. Actually we have some Hepaticas on our property too but they were done for the season.

Here are some examples of what we have planted:

The spent Christmas Hyacinth bulbs flower well for many more years in the field. A Draba which suddenly appeared out of nowhere and an overwintered Delosperma in the "rock garden".


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 04/21/2012 - 00:24

Nice rock garden vignette, Trond! Besides the Delo, and Semp off to the right, what is at the left with small reddish rosettes- Rosularia? and what are the variegated grassy leaves?


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 04/21/2012 - 12:17

More assorted crocuses:
   

Adonis vernalis emerging:

The first waterlily blooms of the season in the greenhouse, Nymphaea 'Helvola':

And with a sunny day warming the soil yesterday, I killed the first lily beetle.  :P


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Sat, 04/21/2012 - 12:55

Several woodland species coming into their own at the moment:-

The Doronicum (caucasicum?) is always a nice surprise early in the season, and here is planted with cyclamen and Corydalis temulifolia 'Chocolate Stars'.

Nearby is another good combination, Tiarella cordifolia and Primula 'Strong Bear' (curious name for a very good deep blue double).

The finest wood anemone in the garden, A. nemorosa 'Allenii'. This is only just beginning to flower and has very large, beautifully soft-blue flowers, though perhaps not best placed under a magnolia that has just finished flowering!


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 04/21/2012 - 21:56

Lori-- lots of nice crocuses! sorry about the lily beetle :(
Several weeks after the winter snow melted from the bed (much of which was quite cool with frequent snow) I finally have a few noses poking (barely) above ground- Crocus and Galanthus, I think.. there was only one yesterday, but a few more today, and with next couple days around 20C, should finally see some progress!
The bad news- looks like maybe vole damage in my older spring bed that has Pulsatilla vulgaris a few bulbs, Muscari etc  too soon to say what they have damaged, hopefully not too much....

Tim, more nice plant combinations! That is a nice A nemorosa :)


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 00:29

cohan wrote:

Nice rock garden vignette, Trond! Besides the Delo, and Semp off to the right, what is at the left with small reddish rosettes- Rosularia? and what are the variegated grassy leaves?

Thanks, Cohan ;)
The variegated grassy leaves are some Crocus as Lori suggests and the rosettes are Rosularia sedoides:


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 00:57

Thanks, Trond- nice Rosularia! I did think after I typed that they could be Crocus.. mine are about 1cm tall so far....lol

Nice waterlily.. we have a wild one around here  too, its yellow.. I don't see it much though,(and not close) since it is in quite inaccessible places here- in (presumably) deep water preceded by sometimes large areas of slough/bog, water, mud etc.. best chance is if a road or trail cuts through those areas and gets you nearer to the deep water..


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 01:11

That somehow seems quite a surprise to see waterlilies like that; I've only seen them in gardens. Interesting website with fine scenery - what are the rock drawings that are shown?


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 01:39

The other place isn't very far in distance from where I live but I've never walked there (have to take a ferry and drive for a couple of hours  ;)

I had a nice walk on another island when I was at my summerhouse yesterday (I drove home in the evening). Had to take my small boat though to get there but the weather was calm and sunny.

At the beach the very common scurvy-grass (Cochlearia officinalis) was in full flower. However, as I don't have scurvy I didn't eat any ;) Here and there the wild gooseberry (Ribes uva-crispa) also bloomed.

   

However my camera is damaged and it is difficult to take pictures - they're not sharp always.

   

The common windflower covers the floor of the deciduous woods. Here and there some other plants find footholds like the yellow star of Bethlehem (Gagea lutea, in Norw "gullstjerne" = gold star) and cowslip (Primula veris). Later the cowslip will dominate in more open situations.


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 01:52

I was early and the flowers still hang down waiting for the chill night air to warm up and the night haze to disappear.

     

Most of the plants have white flowers but quite a few have some pink in them particularly on the reverse of the sepals. Some get darker as they get older. Some of the flowers are quite large too.

   


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 09:51

cohan wrote:

Nice waterlily.. we have a wild one around here  too, its yellow.. I don't see it much though,(and not close) since it is in quite inaccessible places here- in (presumably) deep water preceded by sometimes large areas of slough/bog, water, mud etc.. best chance is if a road or trail cuts through those areas and gets you nearer to the deep water..

That would be spatterdock, Nuphar variegatum.  There is a true water lily also, Nymphaea tetragona, which has white flowers, but I've yet to see it!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 10:28

Lovely pictures, Hoy.  You are very artistic with the camera.
Everything here is way ahead of schedule (at least 3-4 weeks).  My garden in open for the Garden Conservancy May 5th and It will be interesting to see what's in bloom then - not a typical spring following a non-winter.  The rhododendron is R.'Aglo', hardy here and unusual this year because the deer left it alone.  There is usually bloom only on the top which they can't reach.


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 14:36

cohan wrote:

Nice waterlily.. we have a wild one around here  too, its yellow.. I don't see it much though,(and not close) since it is in quite inaccessible places here- in (presumably) deep water preceded by sometimes large areas of slough/bog, water, mud etc.. best chance is if a road or trail cuts through those areas and gets you nearer to the deep water..

Lori wrote:

cohan wrote:

Nice waterlily.. we have a wild one around here  too, its yellow.. I don't see it much though,(and not close) since it is in quite inaccessible places here- in (presumably) deep water preceded by sometimes large areas of slough/bog, water, mud etc.. best chance is if a road or trail cuts through those areas and gets you nearer to the deep water..

That would be spatterdock, Nuphar variegatum.  There is a true water lily also, Nymphaea tetragona, which has white flowers, but I've yet to see it!

We have 3 species of the white Nymphaea (or subspecies some say) which of one have red forms too; and 2 species of the yellow Nuphar. Some of the species are rather common. I have picked them several times in my youth but they're difficult to put in a vase!


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 14:39

Spiegel wrote:

Lovely pictures, Hoy.  You are very artistic with the camera.
Everything here is way ahead of schedule (at least 3-4 weeks).  My garden in open for the Garden Conservancy May 5th and It will be interesting to see what's in bloom then - not a typical spring following a non-winter.  The rhododendron is R.'Aglo', hardy here and unusual this year because the deer left it alone.  There is usually bloom only on the top which they can't reach.

gerrit wrote:

Beautiful pictures Hoy. The morninglight through the leaves in the wood, perfectly catched in your (damaged) camera.

Lina wrote:

Hoy, this is so lovely to see!
I would like to take a walk there.

Thank you for taking us with you.

Lina.

Thanks a lot! But my camera is damaged, I swear! The lens is bad and the electronics do what it want without listening to me!


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 15:02

Trond - it is amazing how Anemone nemorosa grows with hardly anything else flowering at the same time. In Blean woods near us (and Canterbury) it grows just like your pictures, but in other places under coppice it is mixed with bluebells and celandine. Very wonderful to see it en masse as in your photos.


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 15:43

Great stuff!

Trond, the seashore plants are nice, but the Anemone woods are especially lovely :) As Tim mentions, it always fascinates me to see such solid growth of anything, pretty much unheard of here.. the pinkish ones are especially nice...

Anne- love the Hymenoxys, and the view of the Rhodo with the lovely stone house behind is really nice :)

Lori, I don't think I've seen the white waterlily either, though I was happy to see the native water arum once (Calla? too lazy to look it up right now...lol)


Submitted by externmed on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 21:59

Extremely dry and warm spring.  Now 3 to 4 inches of rain and possibly a low of 30F next Monday.
Charles, NE Massachusetts USA Z 6a +/-


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/22/2012 - 23:46

Great Pediocactus! My favourite genus of hardy cacti :)
Love the yellow tulip too :)
Just heard about that storm going through the east- hope you get some good moisture with no damage..
Its turned opposite here- into the low to mid 20'sC the last couple of days and tomorrow (31C forecast for Medicine Hat in southern Alberta) but then temps will drop back to more normal low teens C..
We now have that interesting spring phenomenon- we still have sizeable snow banks on parts of the property, summer temperatures, and mosquitoes!


Submitted by Boland on Mon, 04/23/2012 - 04:08

Trond, your meadows of Anemone are wonderful!  Mine are about 5 cm high at the moment.  Our Cochlearia will not flower until June.

Charles, to grow cacti outside is the stuff of dreams in my area.

We just had another spell of wonderful sunny, warm weather but now it is just 2 C and suppose to stay under 10 C the rest of the week...plus rian, drizzle and fog!  The alpines will be on hold for a while.


Submitted by externmed on Mon, 04/23/2012 - 16:32

Cohan, Todd thanks for your comments.  Have about 7 species of barrel cacti, every winter I hold my breath, but so far they have come through.  Way back when, I angled a sash over a trough for the winter against a south wall; but I've gotten lazy and they're on their own.  They're in at least 20 inches of sand mix above grade and against a free standing brick wall.  I kept finding different sources of sand so it's a bit of an archiological site.  I'm moving toward 90% sand with some limestone gravel (and some dirt), but I haven't gotten there yet.
Many of my cacti came from Beaver Creek in BC.  Penstemons and Astragalus/ Oxytropis seem to have settled in too, at least the ones that lived long enough for me to plant them.  Lewisia rediviva has 2 buds.  I planted one under a stone and one in the open, the stones get infested with ants, so the one in the open is better.
Charles MA USA 6a


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 04/23/2012 - 20:05

An update on the Leibnitzia anandria from here:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=934.msg16283#msg16283
and the follow up message two down on that page.

~~~~Pollination did occur.   When the petals withered, all that was left was the green calyx(or bracts).  Today I noticed these protruding purple appendages.  I am not sure what exactly they are, but they weren't there before!  Only one flower was not pollinated (I asssume).  It's the dried up stem at the lower right in the first photo.

       


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 04/23/2012 - 20:59

I looked for the leaves of Erythronium dens-canis several times on the weekend and saw nothing... today, I come home and not only are the leaves up but this one's in bloom!  :o   (Sheesh, am I that unobservant?!?)


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 04/24/2012 - 12:27

They look cool at that stage, Rick! I like the plant, makes me think of mini Petasites...

Lori- just missed it, or were they that fast in the warm weather? Seems too fast, though...lol


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 04/25/2012 - 04:30

I am still only dreaming of growing cacti in the open garden! Or to be more precise, I have planted 2-3 different taxa (just one pad of each) outside at my summerhouse now ;) - but they still have to face a winter there before I can relax a little.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Wed, 04/25/2012 - 07:21

Our much needed rain blasted the flowers on Paeonia tenuifolia before I got around to photgraphing it but Paeonia mlokosewitschii made it through OK.  This has the added attraction of fire-red seed heads in the fall.  You can see them from quite a distance.


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Wed, 04/25/2012 - 09:48

Charles - really interesting that you grow those cacti in such deep sand and are also trying astragalus and oxytropis. So far I haven't done too well with these but would love to grow more of them successfully. I think Anne also mentioned that her sand beds were very deep. Probably I haven't made them on a big enough scale. The Veronica (bombycina?) is a super plant.


Submitted by externmed on Wed, 04/25/2012 - 17:24

Spiegel wrote:

but Paeonia mlokosewitschii made it through OK.  This has the added attraction of fire-red seed heads in the fall. 

Wonderful specimen in great form. Hopefully it exceeds it's reputation of flowering for a week and looking at it's best for 4 hours.
....but then, how many other cherished plants might deserve that reputation?

Charles MA USA


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Thu, 04/26/2012 - 11:05

I think quite a few plants deserve that reputation but not this one.  It blooms two weeks or longer with new buds opening all the time.  The big deal is that the foliage survives a heavy rain, unlike Paeonia tenuifolia, which really is fleeting unless the weather is perfectly to its liking.


Submitted by Boland on Thu, 04/26/2012 - 17:53

Stunning peony Anne!

You are almost caught up to me Lori....my E. dens-canis is almost past.

Erythronium sibericum is my favourite species...I grew this from seed.  Only one germinated and it is not spreading yet.  I hope it does!


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 04/27/2012 - 13:34

Seems you all soon are ahead of me :-\ Although the weather hasn't been too bad it has been very cool and almost a standstill for plants. No Erythronium,  peony or Trillium have opened yet although they have been ready for weeks.
I don't need rain, I need sun and warm weather!


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 04/28/2012 - 16:23

Beautiful sights in everyone's gardens!  

Some sunshine today has brought out the flowers...
Corydalis solida 'George Baker', 3 plants bought last year:
   

Jeffersonia dubia:

Pulsatilla vulgaris (x2), and P. vulgaris 'Papageno' (x2):
     

Narcissus 'Tete-a-tete':


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 04/29/2012 - 20:22

Lori, the Jeffersonia dubia flower color and petal shape are superb!
(As is everything. :D)
------------------------------------
After our April Chapter meeting yesterday, I went with another member to visit Dick and Shirley's garden (also members).  I've posted pics from their garden before, and it's very memorable.  A few photos I took on this cold, drizzly day:

Anemone nemerosa 'Vestal' and Antennaria 'Silver Edge'

       

Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica) happily thrive seemingly anywhere in the garden.

       

An unexpected treat, Buciniczia cabulica actually overwintered during this extremely mild and practically snowless winter.  I never knew (but why would I?) that it was such an early bloomer: it already has a flower stalk!

             

I am a little partial to Tulipa sylvestris: bent over a little more than normal because of the rain, I think, it reminds me of my avatar. ;D

       

Part of their sand bed, and a lovely, fragrant Daphne caucasica var. rosea

       

Thlaspi praecox is ornamental in both flower and in seed:

             


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/29/2012 - 23:36

Lovely garden visit, Rick! This Thlaspi actually looks something like the only one we have here (the weed)  ;D --I know this one is smaller and cuter with bigger flowers, though the one I saw blooming a week or more back was actually very tiny..lol

That reminds me that the greenest patch so far on my sparsely planted new rock planting from last fall is Taraxacum- even though its pseudo-roseum..lol


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 04/30/2012 - 03:01

I join the chorus!
Lori, your Jeffersonia is awesome!
As is the garden you visited Rick. I am particularly jealous on those Virgina bluebells. I have had several attempts to establish that species but the slugs always make a feast on them.

The lesser celandine (Ranunculus ficaria) is one of the commoner "weeds" in the garden. The gastropods don't like it! I have a pale yellow and a doubleflowered too.
Cardamine heptaphylla and Waldsteinia ternata are also let alone by the slugs.


Submitted by externmed on Mon, 04/30/2012 - 18:00

Enjoying everyones garden shots.
A few more: Fritillaria pallida, Asperula (gussonii or pontica), Dracocephalum imberbe, Lamium garganicum, Houstonia caerulea, and Delosperma (? sp. Reznicek).
The Dracocephalum and the Lamium move about in the sand bed, never staying in place for more than a couple of years.  Houstonia grows here in barren clay soil or barren sandy clay soil, but this large bun was a commercial plant -- generally in the wild the plants without flowers are about an inch across and not much more than 1/4 inch high
Charles, Massachusetts USA z 6a, 40+ inches rain


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 05/01/2012 - 00:33

Charles, some really choice selections!
Trond- I like your weeds! I wonder if R ficaria is hardy and/or weedy here? the mix of yellow and white is nice...


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Tue, 05/01/2012 - 02:42

I'm with Trond on those mertensias - what a sight! I only have one plant in my garden which has never increased. Something about those blues.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Tue, 05/01/2012 - 08:27

The genistas are coming into bloom now, one of my favorite times in the early garden.  They have an affinity for stone.  This one is blooming in the lower crevice garden and has formed a waterfall.  The second picture is a general view of the lower crevice garden.


Submitted by Peden on Tue, 05/01/2012 - 08:37

Cohan; I was unable to get Ranunculus ficaria going in my giant sand bed of a yard despite its aggressive reputation. The Mertensia has been around for a while and does reseed. Both probably like wet soil at least in spring. The Ranunculus probably likes it heavy.


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 05/01/2012 - 11:19

Anne- fantastic!

Bundraba- no sand in sight here!  lol I do have one end of the yard that stays fairly moist, though often we have a dry spell in spring after the snow is gone and before summer rains start.. This year is different- April was a bit wetter than usual, and May is off to a wet start with a couple of days of rain- spotty yesterday, but pretty steady so far today...


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 05/01/2012 - 13:58

I don't think R ficaria grows in a (dry) sand bed :o
They prefere moist soil at least in the spring, then summer drought is no problem. It is two different forms though, one spreads by seeds (no bulblets) and the other by bulblets (no seeds). My plants are mostly the bulblet-type, except the pale one.

Your garden shots are something to enjoy too, Charles! So is your Genista, Anne!


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 05/01/2012 - 14:15

Although all the rhododendron flowers were damaged in early April frost the buds were not.

Here are two. Rh lanatum 'Muncaster Castle' and an hybrid of unknown parentage. The flower truss looks small but that's due to the very big leaves!

   

For the first time in three years the ivy managed to ripen the berries. They flower late fall and are pollinated mostly by flies etc. The birds do eat the fruits and spread the seeds.


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 05/01/2012 - 22:21

cohan wrote:

Trond- I like your weeds! I wonder if R ficaria is hardy and/or weedy here? the mix of yellow and white is nice...

Cohan, I've found R. ficaria to be somewhat hardy here, lasting for 3-4 years, though perhaps the dry conditions I had it in were not ideal for it and contributed to its short life.


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 05/02/2012 - 00:02

The Rhodos are great, Trond- not so many of those hardy here! There are some newish hyrbrids supposed to be hardy, though I doubt they are as big as yours, and probably mostly deciduous.. I haven't tried any yet...

Thanks for the ficaria comments, all.. worth trying, I guess!


Submitted by Howey on Wed, 05/02/2012 - 04:27

Anne - being partial to yellow and "waterfalls", those genistas you posted are to die for.  Right now in my rock garden there are Potentilla hyparctica, Ranunculus grammineus, Kerria japonica, Ribes odorata and Laburnum blazing away - such a cheering sight when we have been having a spell of dull weather just now.  Will post some pics when I get on to this new camera.  I promise.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b


Submitted by RickR on Wed, 05/02/2012 - 04:38

cohan wrote:

This Thlaspi actually looks something like the only one we have here (the weed)  ;D --I know this one is smaller and cuter with bigger flowers, though the one I saw blooming a week or more back was actually very tiny..lol

Many years ago, I almost grew Thlaspi arvensis (our native weed) on purpose, before I realized what it was. :D  I have to say, though, that the seed pods do look nice in a dried floral arrangement.

Anne, those genistas are truly spectacular.  Thanks for showing them off.  It would be a travesty to keep them all to yourself!
----------------------------------------
More from the garden:

     Stylophorum diphyllum and Mertensia alpina alba
       

     Convallaria majalis 'Aureo-striatum'
             

     Fibigia eriocarpa and Fibigia clypeata
       [

     An older Fibigia clypeata
             

     Thermopsis fabacea and Pulmonaria 'Silver Streams'
       

     Peltoboykinia watanabei
             


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 05/02/2012 - 11:01

Fran- we're eagerly awaiting you getting your camera going :)

Rick- nice stuff, I'm trying to recall whether I know Fibygia or not, seems interesting... the variegation is really nice on that Convallaria!


Submitted by RickR on Wed, 05/02/2012 - 20:34

Aureo-striatum Lily of the Valley is not a very stable cultivar.  Every year I cut out reversions.  Consequently, it increases slowly.

Fibigia clypeata I keep around for dried arrangements.  The seedpod "windows" are quite ornamental.  Fibigia eriocarpa I am trying just to see how it is different.  This is its first year blooming - not too impressive, I might add.

       

             


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Thu, 05/03/2012 - 04:48

Fran, I also grow Ranunculus gramineus and love the way the sharp yellow flowers seem to float above the surrounding plants.  It introduces a new level in the garden and self sows, but not aggressively.  I used to have Viola aetolica which always self-sowed, but it seems to have disappeared or been taken over, too bad.


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 05/03/2012 - 08:47

Thanks for the that, Stephen.  The F. eriocarpa does grow in drier and heavier clay soil than the others.  The photos are not a perfect comarison, and this is only the second year from seed for F. eriocarpa, while I have grown F. clypeata for many years.

Tim (or anyone), PM me if you would like clypeata seed.  I can send it off right now, if you like, rather than waiting for fresh batch of seed.


Submitted by Boland on Sat, 05/05/2012 - 17:10

Some great plants!  You are ALL ahead of me...including Lori.  We have had 1-3 C for a week now and everything is in suspended animation.  After a record warm April, looks like a record cold May!

Rick, love the foliage on that Peltoboykinia...I have a few seedlings up so keeping my fingers crossed.

Only new alpine opening at the moment is Arabis flaviflora...not yellow as you would think but with a lovely yellow centre.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 05/05/2012 - 21:02

RickR wrote:

An unexpected treat, Buciniczia cabulica actually overwintered during this extremely mild and practically snowless winter.  I never knew (but why would I?) that it was such an early bloomer: it already has a flower stalk!

Is that unusual there, Rick?  Judging from the specimens in the garden of an alpine expert here, it is very hardy... (and I have some seedlings of it waiting to be planted out!)


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 05/05/2012 - 21:05

Howey wrote:

Anne - being partial to yellow and "waterfalls", those genistas you posted are to die for.  Right now in my rock garden there are Potentilla hyparctica, Ranunculus grammineus, Kerria japonica, Ribes odorata and Laburnum blazing away - such a cheering sight when we have been having a spell of dull weather just now.  Will post some pics when I get on to this new camera.  I promise.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Looking forward to it, Frances!


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 05/05/2012 - 21:50

Oh my, Lori!  I had no idea about the Buciniczia!  Somehow, I had the idea that it was only hardy to zone 6.  It is pretty unknown here.  I have only seen it once before in someone annual container garden, and also sold as such at a nursery.

Incidentally, after she saw my post on the Forum, Shirley mentioned that she had kept another in her cold frame for "back up", but the stem rotted at the soil line.
----------------------------------

An update with Fargesia rufa:
The drought that continued from late August until two weeks ago took its toll.  Despite the ridiculously warm winter, practically every leaf dried up.

       

So this is the first year that I have decided to treat it as an herbaceous plant, and I cut everything to the ground.  As these bamboos do every year, new culms are generated profusely.  

             

Many of the stalks themselves were still alive and green.  As I removed them, I notice that they would make nice fillers for dried floral arrangements.  

       


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 05/06/2012 - 00:09

Lots of good colour there, Todd! Never fear- you always have my garden to make you feel much advanced ;) I have retic Irises just barely in flower, and Scilla and Cory solida budding- maybe something will open the next few days which should be sunny after a week (two?) of mostly cool and wet weather- unusually rainy for springtime here, but not a bad thing.... We missed the snow that fell in southern Alberta today, just some scattered rain showers here..


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 05/06/2012 - 01:20

RickR wrote:

An update with Fargesia rufa:
The drought that continued from late August until two weeks ago took its toll.  Despite the ridiculously warm winter, practically every leaf dried up.
So this is the first year that I have decided to treat it as an herbaceous plant, and I cut everything to the ground.  As these bamboos do every year, new culms are generated profusely.  
Many of the stalks themselves were still alive and green.  As I removed them, I notice that they would make nice fillers for dried floral arrangements.  

Had you left them where they were I think they had produced new leaves. But they are pretty in floral arrangements too ;)


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 05/06/2012 - 01:30

Todd wrote:

Some great plants!  You are ALL ahead of me...including Lori.  We have had 1-3 C for a week now and everything is in suspended animation.  After a record warm April, looks like a record cold May!

Rick, love the foliage on that Peltoboykinia...I have a few seedlings up so keeping my fingers crossed.

Only new alpine opening at the moment is Arabis flaviflora...not yellow as you would think but with a lovely yellow centre.

Todd, don't despire! You are in front of me! We had an record warm March but since it has been cold. Last night we even had another hailstorm and it is still heaps of hail out there  (9AM).
Only some of the earlier Primulas have started flowering and many plants are, as you say, in suspended animation. Some hasn't changed much in two weeks.


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 05/06/2012 - 06:13

Yes, Trond.  The green stalks would have produced leaves, and even the brown ones, if they act like other years, turn greener as spring progresses.  But the crispy brown secondary "branches" remain, and are unsightly well into summer because growth is poor, comapared to new culms.  Normally I cut them back the old stalks by about half, and even then in the summer, I often end up removing them in favor of the much fresher, robust, and better looking new culms.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 05/06/2012 - 10:00

Lots going on in the garden now but I need someone PLEASE to identify this gorgeous astragalus.  Are you listening, Panayoti?


Submitted by Boland on Sun, 05/06/2012 - 19:12

Rick, my Fargesia muriale also took a beating this winter but its not as brown as yours, so I am hopeful it will re-leaf.  I was given a small rufa last summer...I overwintered it in  a coldframe and it appears completely dead...I'll hold on to it a while longer to see if it resurrects like yours.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 05/06/2012 - 20:33

A few things here, after a week of rain and snow...
Caltha leptosepala; Primula marginata 'Sheila Denby' x2; Petrocallis pyrenaica; Primula algida; update on Thlaspi kurdicum:

           

Looks like Rheum rhizostachyum will bloom this year:

Adonis vernalis:

   

Arabis androsacea:


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 05/06/2012 - 22:27

Nice! I especially like the Thlaspi and Rheum in tufa! Do these have the original media you felt was too rich, or do they have the leaner mix?
How big is/(will it be) the Rheum?


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 05/06/2012 - 22:50

Does this mean its really spring now??
This is the first to suddenly bloom today (I hadn't even noticed buds) in  a new crocus etc bed at the foot of my new semp bed.. I planted these last fall, and have been watching eagerly since snow melted on this bed some time ago ( I tried to find photos that pinpoint the date, but it seems I was only taking pics of the semps up above..lol-- but it seems the winter snow must have been gone at the beginning of april, with several snowfalls after) and the crocus plants began to appear weeks ago, so I was starting to think there would be no flowers this year! Well, this one began today, with another close behind, and more buds.. These are from a big box store package labelled 'vernus and flavus'.. I assumed this must, then, be flavus, but I guess vernus can be yellow also (though why add flavus if your vernus mix includes yellow, right?) ...anyway, I'm not concerned about labelling big box store bulbs ..
I also have retic Iris in flower, but still can't get a photo I'm happy with-- its  a very dark, deep rich violet I have not yet been able to capture...


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 05/07/2012 - 23:03

cohan wrote:

Nice! I especially like the Thlaspi and Rheum in tufa! Do these have the original media you felt was too rich, or do they have the leaner mix?
How big is/(will it be) the Rheum?

The Rheum rhizostachyum is supposed to have flower stalks to 15cm.  This is the only one of the 4 I planted out that shows signs of blooming this year.  The soil between the tufa blocks in this area is probably richer than it needs to be, although most things seem okay so far.  The Chaenactis alpina I planted last year rotted out during a rainy spell in the same season, however.


Submitted by Peden on Tue, 05/08/2012 - 08:53

Lots going on here in May. Here's a few things as they stand right now: 002 is Armeria caespitosa, Aubrieta and Forget-me-nots:

003 is Phlox 'Lemhi Midnight'.

004 is Primula 'Wanda' always a dependable spot of bright color.

010 is Eriogonum umbellatum 'Porteri' recommended to me by Anne Spiegel at the Stonecrop sale a few years ago.

018 is Anemone 'Blue Eyes'. Wood Anemones do good here once they finally get going (2-3 years).

036 is draba rigida 'bryoides'; Erysimum 'Orange Flame' and a little cosmos of Androsace. At the very top are Ajuga reptans amid Cimicifuga 'Brunette'. But there's also lots of Dandelions and the birds have planted Garlic Mustard; dear gentle little creatures.


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 05/08/2012 - 11:22

Lots of gems there, Bundraba! I have several Erigoniums from seed now but not that one ;)

Cohan, nice Crocus! I think it is a flavus, can't imagine such deep yellow vernus.
BTW, it is still much snowsome places. A couple of hours drive from here it is still more than 1meter!


Submitted by Weiser on Tue, 05/08/2012 - 15:21

Penstemon nitidus & Tulipa batalinii

Astragalus newberryi var. castoreus

[attach thumb=2]

Echinocereus reichenbachii ssp. albispinus

[attach thumb=3]


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 05/08/2012 - 17:22

Spiegel wrote:

Lots going on in the garden now but I need someone PLEASE to identify this gorgeous astragalus.  Are you listening, Panayoti?

John, Michael, Lori: some great plants being shown here; I've only had time for a quick browse.  Cohan, glad to see that spring has finally arrived in your area and the crocus are blooing. 

Anne, the Astragalus sp is gorgeous, one the more concise and appealing peas I've seen, the foliage is wonderful.  To help narrow down possibilities, do you know the source of the plant, or a seed source.  If it could be narrowed down to a particular State, then searching for an ID would be easier.

I saw your post on SRGC too.  

For a peak at the work Anne is doing expanding her natural rock outcrop areas, take a look here:
http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=4656.msg245780#msg245780


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 05/08/2012 - 23:08

What a beautiful astragalus, Anne!  It will be nice to know its name, so I hope it is ID'd.

Bundraba! and John, your photos are stunning! 


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Wed, 05/09/2012 - 09:40

McDonough wrote:

Spiegel wrote:

Lots going on in the garden now but I need someone PLEASE to identify this gorgeous astragalus.  Are you listening, Panayoti?

John, Michael, Lori: some great plants being shown here; I've only had time for a quick browse.  Cohan, glad to see that spring has finally arrived in your area and the crocus are blooing. 

Anne, the Astragalus sp is gorgeous, one the more concise and appealing peas I've seen, the foliage is wonderful.  To help narrow down possibilities, do you know the source of the plant, or a seed source.  If it could be narrowed down to a particular State, then searching for an ID would be easier

Mark, I wish I knew the source.  It's the only one I have so probably I didn't grow it from seed.  Have checked my records and not found anything I purchased that could be this one.  I've had it a few years and it just keeps getting better and better.  The foliage is furry and fabulous and each year it is more floriferous.  I'm reasonably certain it's not american, but Panayoti might prove me wrong.  The problem is that it hasn't made pods yet so I've not been able to collect any seed.  It makes me very nervous to have only one plant.  PLEASE, someone identify this wonderful astragalus.


Submitted by IMYoung on Wed, 05/09/2012 - 09:59

Spiegel wrote:

McDonough wrote:

Spiegel wrote:

Lots going on in the garden now but I need someone PLEASE to identify this gorgeous astragalus.  Are you listening, Panayoti?

John, Michael, Lori: some great plants being shown here; I've only had time for a quick browse.  Cohan, glad to see that spring has finally arrived in your area and the crocus are blooing. 

Anne, the Astragalus sp is gorgeous, one the more concise and appealing peas I've seen, the foliage is wonderful.  To help narrow down possibilities, do you know the source of the plant, or a seed source.  If it could be narrowed down to a particular State, then searching for an ID would be easier

Mark, I wish I knew the source.  It's the only one I have so probably I didn't grow it from seed.  Have checked my records and not found anything I purchased that could be this one.  I've had it a few years and it just keeps getting better and better.  The foliage is furry and fabulous and each year it is more floriferous.  I'm reasonably certain it's not american, but Panayoti might prove me wrong.  The problem is that it hasn't made pods yet so I've not been able to collect any seed.  It makes me very nervous to have only one plant.  PLEASE, someone identify this wonderful astragalus.

I have been intrigued by Anne's lovely Astragalus, which I thought was an American species and have been  wondering where I have seen something like it.
Now  with Anne's latest remarks, I wonder if it might be a Turkish species?
Mojmir Pavelka has shown a little furry yellow species which he calls Astragalus pelliger... though I think that is not a fully accepted name... have a look at this plant from Dedegol Dag in  the IRG  #23 - page 7......
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2011Nov241322170676IRG_23_-_November2...

;)


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 05/09/2012 - 14:09

So many beauties :)
Bundraba- love the nice big clumps you have of many plants..

John W- I like the paler flowers of Echinocereus r. albispinus, and E bonkerae is very flashy!


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 05/09/2012 - 14:47

IMYoung wrote:

I have been intrigued by Anne's lovely Astragalus, which I thought was an American species and have been  wondering where I have seen something like it.
Now  with Anne's latest remarks, I wonder if it might be a Turkish species?
Mojmir Pavelka has shown a little furry yellow species which he calls Astragalus pelliger... though I think that is not a fully accepted name... have a look at this plant from Dedegol Dag in  the IRG  #23 - page 7......
http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/logdir/2011Nov241322170676IRG_23_-_November2...

;)

In my flora of Turkey it's abad picture of a plant named Astragalus pelliger, not unlike yours Anne. However the flowerheads seem to be larger but they are quite similar. So are the leaves.

Here is my unnamed Tukish Astragalus in situ. Didn't find any seeds :-\


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 05/10/2012 - 04:50

Although the weather has been rather cold the last weeks some plants have started flowering about on time.

The summer dormant Geranium macrostylum starts in May and continue about two months before it goes completely dormant. The wallflower (Erysimum cheirii, syn Cheiranthus cheirii) is biennial but selfsow around. The fragrant shrub Osmanthus burkwoodii spread its intoxicating odour all over the garden!

       

Ribes sanguineum flowers for about one month. So do Chaenomeles japonica. Neither have any detectable scent however. Pieris 'Forest Flame' doesn't have any fragrance either. The tree peony P rockii is "pregnant" with 50 flowers!

       


Submitted by cohan on Thu, 05/10/2012 - 12:02

My mostly baby garden (with a few spots of senescence) can't compete with the wonders we see here! But there are finally a few bits of activity :)

My second crocus, C vernus from the same mixed package as the C flavus the other day

Scilla, I forget what it is, also from a cheap big box store package a couple of years ago, doing better this year, last year I thought they might disappear, but I improved the spring drainage of the bed (a ditch in front!); I've been studying a bit to try to improve these violet blue shades-- in person, this is really fairly dark with a definite violet cast, though this is not as hard to get as the iris...

These are from a bunch of bits of roots and rhizomes sent to me by a friend in Poland last fall, and with many pieces going in several places, I didn't tag anything, but presume they will all be easy enough to distinguish at full growth! Right now though, not sure what's what- there were a couple of Anemones- this could be A ranunculoides?

 

And these could be Dentaria?

 

A couple more- these retic Irises are already a little past their prime, but I've been trying repeatedly to get a reasonable colour- this still isn't right, but closer- these are a dark violet in person..

And the only Pulsatilla vulgaris left in this patch after vole damage or whatever it was that wiped out the two large plants this winter :(


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Thu, 05/10/2012 - 15:38

The Astragalus are just mouthwatering - I have seed germinating of a lot of legumes and hope some turn out to be half as attractive. A really fascinating group of plants. The blues of the pentstemons are also pretty stunning from what at present is a soggy British garden - all our rain for spring seems to have come in April and May! (But useful).

A little potful of Gentiana verna - these are a group of different seedlings, one in particular is much smaller, which we are growing to collect seed from. Such a glorious plant.


Submitted by Boland on Thu, 05/10/2012 - 17:36

Beautiful display Bundraba!

Lori you are right on par with me.  That Rheum is a gem and I love the Arabis androsacea.

Here are some 'woodlanders' blooming today.


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 05/11/2012 - 00:22

Hoy wrote:

Not a bad start, Cohan!
I agree that it is A ranunculoides and a Cardamine. Maybe C. dentaria ;)

Thanks, Trond.. there were a couple of Anemones, but I'm not sure more than one type is up so far; he only sent one Dentaria, so I just need to find the full list, which I think is in an email...lol..
I'm not at all up on the Cardamine vs Dentaria story, I did get the impression there had been some movement of names there, but have no idea from which genus to which genus for what reason...lol

Love the woodlanders, Todd- wonderful colour on the nemorosa- I've had some seeds a couple of times, but so far I have not seen any seedlings :( The Trillium erectum is lovely too, and a very atypical colour for spring :)


Submitted by Peden on Fri, 05/11/2012 - 08:28

Second wave Rhodies: This low growing white one was likely purchased on sale at a local big box store.

Photo2 is R. 'Aglo' as seen by Gentiana acaulis.... never mind the colors. Well; heck; you only live once.

Photo3 is of the smallest Delphinium I know. Initially there were three from central Montana south facing slip scree. Bugs,
slugs and ignorance consumed two. Though all three of these are still very much in effect, a marked decrease in the last may be putting the other two in check. This plant has two (living) children.

Photo4 is Telesonix jamesii. It has bloomed and may again this year. Like others do, I wonder if it would cross with a Heuchera.

Photo5 is Androsace villosa and Polygala calcarea. The Polygala is the more adventurous of the two in this garden. The Androsace has yet to really get going.

Anne; congrats on the Blue Broom. I'm working on (killing?) my third one this year!


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 05/11/2012 - 21:04

I much prefer the weedy blue foreigner, Echium vulgare, to these Echium russicum.  But I had to try them to see what they were like.

             

       

The Iris riechenbachii are blooming:

       

             

There is just something about Shooting Stars that captivates me, especially the alba form of Dodecatheon media.  The flowers seem to float in the air like butterflies.

             

       


Submitted by Boland on Sat, 05/12/2012 - 17:10

Rick, I am amazed your Echium is open at the same time as your Dodecatheon.....my former does not bloom until August yet my Dodecatheon is now in bud.

Here is a scene from my woodland garden.


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 05/12/2012 - 19:14

Todd wrote:

Rick, I am amazed your Echium is oipen aat the same time as your Dodecatheon.....my former does not bloom until August yet my Dodecatheon is now in bud.

Here is a scene from my woodland garden.

Yes, all the photos were taken yesterday.  The echium is in the hot (temperature wise) garden.  The dodecatheon is in a much cooler garden, although I don't have a nice wet-moist place for it.  I didn't grow the Echium russicum from seed.  They came from the huge Friends School Plant sale http://friendsschoolplantsale.com/.  I collaborate with the organizer/director/buyer.  He is now on our NARGS Chapter board, too.  Henry was just visiting my gardens a few days ago, and he brought me a nice piece of Corydalis nobilis.  

Todd, love the dark hellebore in your photo. :)


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 05/12/2012 - 20:45

Looks like spring is really here!  Beautiful sights, everyone!

I have some catching up to do...
Tulipa turkestanica; Chionodoxa 'Pink Giant'; Corydalis nobilis (x2); Narcissus 'Jetfire':

     

Pulsatilla turczaninovii - gorgeous flower colour; Eremostachys speciosa will bloom this year; I bought a beautiful plant of Saxifraga 'Gregor Mendel' in bloom last year, but I guess it will have to adapt to my conditions before it puts on such a good show again - I got one flower stalk this year!
   

Primula elatior ssp. meyeri; a modest bloom on Douglasia montana (the flowers are darker pink than the photo shows):
 


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 05/12/2012 - 20:58

Draba ventosa; Potentilla nivea - as the buds begin to break, the petals appear to be orange (from the orange tip of the bud), but open yellow with an orange spot at the base; Tulipa tarda; Sanguinaria canadensis:
     

Primula rusbyi; I have almost missed Adonis x amurensis 'Fukujukai' - here's the tail-end of bloom; Pulsatilla pratensis, from seed a couple of years ago:
     

Hepatica nobilis 'Rubra Plena'; Vitaliana primuliflora v. cinerea:
 


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 05/12/2012 - 23:30

Bundraba- I like the juxtaposition of the Gentiana with the Rhodo :)

Rick-  Iris reichenbachii is very sweet! native Dodecatheons will probably start in a couple/several weeks- we are at that odd stage where only a small handful of the very earliest wildflowers have started, but in a few weeks there will be many!

Todd- nice woodland- what sort of light does this planting get?

Lori- especially like the Tulipa turkestanica and Eremostachys :)


Submitted by Boland on Sun, 05/13/2012 - 07:23

I should have bought a C. nobilis when I had the chance!  Lori, you are pretty much smack on with me, although my P. unifolia is not open yet.

Cohan, that woodland garden gets morning sun but afternoon shade.  It can get pretty dry in summer as the large Philadelphus there sucks every bit of water.


Submitted by externmed on Sun, 05/13/2012 - 09:49

It's nice to revisit spring over again, with Todd.
Moving along, Calochortus (reliable small CV) and Iris x Dardanus

Charles Swanson MAssachusetts 6A USA


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 05/14/2012 - 01:05

What beauties you all show! Here things don't grow - or are damaged by strong winds. Yesterday we had the second gale in three days. It's more like late autumn or winter weather.
I managed to sneak out an hour yesterday between the storms to take a few pictures and look for damage.

An edible mushroom but toxic if you don't prepare it correctly (Gyromitra esculenta). This dicentra (Ichtyoselmis macrantha) does good in the shade of the trees so does the Hylomecon vernalis (syn japonica). Corydalis nigro-apiculata grows among small shrubs and is completely hardy often starting growing midwinter without damage.

       

The first peony to flower is P. mairei. It is almost at schedule but all the rest of them are very late this season. Many rhododendrons have suffered in the strong winds and lost buds and flowers. Some are completely defoliated too from the hurricane last winter. However quite a few manage to flower still, here is Rh cinnabarinum Roylei. The banana plant does actually grow (in a pot) outside in the cold weather but the leaves are damaged although it sits in the most sheltered place I have!

     


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Mon, 05/14/2012 - 06:49

Wonderful primulas, Todd.
Bundraba - I have killed several Erinacea pungens while waiting for them to bloom.  This is my first success.  Patience pays!  Have several more in the garden still in the non-blooming stage.  They do seem to take a few years to settle in and do their thing.


Submitted by Peden on Tue, 05/15/2012 - 08:38

I don't know if this is east to west west to east or whatever. There is a bit more work and less doting as the fecund season approaches.

Photo1 is Sakurasoh grown from NARGS seed. Aubrieta is in the background.

Photo2 is Lewisia pygmaea I bought mail order years ago (probably SiskiyouRPN). It has seeded about joyfully. In fact there are other Lewisias seeding in here: my little Lewis Meadows -which I hope to  expand upon!

Photo3 is our native Anemone quinqufolia, a delicate thing that grows in the mountains near by.

Photo4 is Trillium cuneatum. I got it from Potterton and Martin years ago.

Photo5 is the very dainty Sand Myrtle.

Photo6 is R. 'Scintillation'. Never before has it bloomed! Global warming? Yes!

photo7 is Areneria (Minuartia) obtusiloba native to the Rockies. This is a top rate Sandwort.

Photo8: Great gobs of 'Blue Ridge' Phlox! Imagine this carpeting an acre of woodland? Its one of two plants I got from Logee's (1995?) before I knew there were dedicated sellers of alpine plants. The other was Muehelenbeckia axillaris, which I still have too.

Photo9 -just for fun.

photo10; It's just a wonderful magic carpet ride, a color cosmos, sublime admiration.


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 05/15/2012 - 12:59

cohan wrote:

Lots going on in all those pics :)
Trond- not too bad considering the conditions you mention!

Yes, fortunately I have always some spots that is not exposed so much to the elements  ;)
Nice weather today but rain and cold the next 3-4 days :(

Bundraba, you have a impressive wide range of plants! I'm envying you the 'Blue Ridge'!
Does the Anemone quinquefolia set seed? I'm interested in swapping ;)

And Todd, here are some more rhodos, not all orange though ;) Labels lost long ago as usual.

         


Submitted by Peden on Wed, 05/16/2012 - 12:48

I just have to squeeze in a few more....

Photo1 is one of the treasures of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Unlike our puny little local Houstonia, this one is hefty and takes full hot sun well. I see the NARGS annual meeting is down there next year. This wondrous region is fully worthy; enjoy it.

Photo2: This blooms and sets a few seeds most years but never have I seen it like this (there's just gotta be a reason!). Seed goes on the exchange as Packera ex. Red Mountain Montana. I became intrigued by these on my first (plant) visit to the  Rockies; every mountain range seems to have its own one. I seek those that are stoloniferous rather than singular so that they may be made good and perennial. I'd also like a good orange! This is one of the finest small silver foliage plants in my garden -if not THE finest. It may be P. paupercula that is native here, so this is not entirely without precedent. There's also Pediocactus in the photo.

photo3 is a little Pussy Toe (Antenneria) that I found on Bald Ridge. It is a cushion former. The leaves have a distinct diamond shape. It grows among the likes of Eritrichium howardii and Astragalus kentrophyta so I don't expect easy and immediate success, but who knows? A. umbrinella is the only name I've seen that might be it.

Trond; yes variety is a good deal of the fun. It makes for an interesting garden and each plant is so interesting too in how it responds to various conditions etc. I sometimes think that after getting to know a plant well -I know its native environment too -even though I may have never been there. A small bed of Lewisias, for example, can nearly transport one to a High Cascade ridge, if one gets right down into it


Submitted by tropicalgirl25… on Wed, 05/16/2012 - 16:14

I am attaching some pictures i have taken yesterday. The weather is extreme for the last 3 days.The daytime temperature is between 20C-26C.The plants are sulking  at this condition
Krish


Submitted by Peden on Thu, 05/17/2012 - 09:08

Krish, It looks like you are working with the peat stuff Saxifrage technique I've espoused for years! You are in New England? That vertical placement might get ya though. I find it hard to keep really slow growing things from anchoring in properly, at least without a ledge to sit on; or some batter to the wall. Good luck!


Submitted by tropicalgirl25… on Thu, 05/17/2012 - 09:50

Hi Bundraba
the sax is there for two years.I got as rooted in tufa  from wrigtman.Two others  I got destroyed by birds.They picked the branches and left them on the ground. This spring that two are also coming up nicely .The cuttings I got from the destroyed pieces where rooted and kept in tufa.Two weeks ago I kept them near a small stream of water. They look very happy.
Krish


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 05/17/2012 - 22:34

Iris typhifolia
       

Dracocephalum ruyschiana
       

Ptilostemon afer and Echium russicum
       

I noticed the developing seed pods of Saruma henryi today.  They are interesting, too.
       

Clematis ochroleuca
         


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 05/17/2012 - 22:47

I had forgotten to post the open Clematis ochotensis.  It bloomed 20 April:

       

Notice the peculiar bent edges of the petals.  I really like that.  The flower color is actually a shade darker than the photos.


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 05/18/2012 - 01:06

Rick, the Draco is native of Norway although I have never seen it! I like the flower of both your Clematises. At home only the alpine types have started flowering. (I am at my summerhouse now - long weekend due to the "National Day"  May 17th.) I like the Echium too. Have seen pictures of it from the steppes. And Saruma - I've given up growing it due to slugs :(


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 05/18/2012 - 22:27

Catching up again...
Pulsatilla turczaninovii:
   

Lathyrus vernus gracilis:

Fritillaria meleagris - they seed loosely throughout the back yard but this bunch made a nice arrangement:

Hacquetia epipactis:
 

Our native Androsace chamaejasme:
 

Bergenia 'Eroica':


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 05/18/2012 - 22:35

Draba rigida:

Fritillaria pallidiflora:
 

Trollius laxus:

Progress on the flower stalk of Eremostachys speciosa:

A very mealy little Primula scotica... unfortunately the flower is somewhat damaged:

First blooms on Eritrichium pauciflorum ssp. sajanense:

Dracocephalum palmatum:

The usual heavy bloom on Pulsatilla vulgaris 'Papageno':

A number of young, self-seeded Pulsatilla vulgaris:


Submitted by Peden on Sat, 05/19/2012 - 07:34

Echinocereus viridiflorus; Orostachys minuta and a Cryptantha from the Wildcat Hills in Nebraska. Two of four flowered this year and promptly both rotted! The two remaining are smaller and in somewhat different culture.

Lori; I'll have to remember to look for the Pulsatilla with the unpronounceable name!


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 05/19/2012 - 10:12

Bundraba! wrote:

Krish, It looks like you are working with the peat stuff Saxifrage technique I've espoused for years! You are in New England?

Bundraba, Krish is in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, zone 3... a far cry from New England.  :)


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 05/19/2012 - 11:32

Lori, of all your wonderful plants I'll say that Pulsatilla turczaninovii takes the prize ;)

Been for a little trip today. First we took the small bat round the island (2.5km x 0.5km), then we took a walk on the only "road" that is on the island. Half of the island was farmed once and have a kind of track for the small tractor they used. Now only sheep graze the meadows. Fortunately they are still on another island therefore we can enjoy the blossom of early summer.

The crab apple (Malus sylvatica) and Crategus monogyna are still in flower. However, it isn't easy to distinguish the wild apple from garden escapes.

 

Geranium sanguineum has just started flowering and so has the weed G. molle. Along the track and on small ridges and banks Saxifrage granulata dominate.

     


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 05/19/2012 - 11:45

It is always nice to find it although it is rather common, the blue Polygala vulgaris. Polygonatum odoratum has a nice scent, you can discern it from a distance.

   

Also blue violets like this Viola riviniana dot the woods everywhere at this time of the year. The old pastures are still filled with Primula veris but the orchid Orchis mascula is almost disappeared due to the sheep's grazing.

     


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 05/19/2012 - 12:33

What a spectacle that Eremostachys speciosa is!  Like a tiny water fountain with all that white "cotton candy".  Great stuff, Lori, Trond and Bundraba.
-------------------------------------

Penstemon grandiflorus blooms nicely now.  These are from seed collected in Isanti County, central Minnesota.  I really don't see any difference from this locality, though.  They seed into the lawn sometimes.
       

Syneilesis aconitifolia
, and S.aconitifolia, Hosta nigrescens, Epimedium seedling, Podophyllum hexandrum, Iris cristata.
         

A yellow leaf creeping veronica, very nice even though I don't know the name.  Thalictrum aquilegifolia.
       


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 05/19/2012 - 14:12

Nice Penstemon! Seems you have summer Rick! Here it is still spring ;)

Some plants from the "garden" at our summerhouse. Most plants grow as they like here. Almost no weeding ;D

I've planted several Narcissi and tulips. Both the roe deer and the mice like tulips but Narcissi are left. Here are however a rare tulip (an unnamed species) and a lateflowering Narcissus.
Omphalodes verna do spread a little but go dormant later in summer. All the rain this season has been good for the moss!

   

Once I planted 3 different Primula cv here, one white, one red and one yellow. Now they have done some crosses of their own.

   


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 05/21/2012 - 09:32

It's lovely to see what's going on in your areas, Trond, Rick and Bundraba!  So glad you have joined us, Krish - looking forward to more scenes from your garden!  :)

First blooms on Potentilla frigida, wild-collected in the Walliser Alps (NARGS seed):

Townsendia parryi:

Bloom starting on Phlox multiflora:

This is way beyond my limited photographic skills to capture, but these are the airy flower stalks of Androsace septentionalis, where they have been reseeding themselves in a trough!

A bit of bloom on Silene acaulis, also in a trough:


Submitted by Peden on Mon, 05/21/2012 - 10:40

I'm working with different types of rock and different soil profiles. I love crevice gardening! The white garden (Light Bridge;a distant range of spectacular snow covered peaks!) is at the very western end of the Great Cordillera and was built in 2010 (there is no train yet). Sprinkled here and there with little treasures; it will fill up fast! The Yellow daisy is from the Wallowa Mountains and is unprecedented here. Never before has anything like this lived long enough to bloom naturally; and from seed too!

Here's something that could be more widely grown. I have two collections of Erigeron flagellaris -this one is from the Abajo Peak area. It is actually a bit too vigorous grown in a warm raised bed, but given space, it could really be an asset. The other is planted by the road where it doesn't bloom as well but it has space to make a nice compact mat.

Photo5 is a seedling to the effect of Lewisia 'little plum' or some such. It seeds strongly here and they don't apparently vary. L. 'pinkie' is in front. It makes a nice dome of leaves but blooms rarely.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 05/21/2012 - 11:43

Looks terrific, Bundraba!!  :o :o  Love the different geologic terrains.  ;D   Well, I guess the train would add historical accuracy, but I draw the line at a miniature ski slope and resort in every valley... gotta maintain some wilderness!   ;D ;D  
What kind of stone is the white garden made of?

Love the daisies... would the yellow one happen to be Erigeron linearis?  I think the provenance would fit.


Submitted by Peden on Mon, 05/21/2012 - 12:58

Lori, E. linearis is one of them but there's another from that region. I've been trying all day to recall it! Probably just a bit of research needed. The stone might simply be called Shelburne Limestone from Shelburne Limestone Co. One very nice thing about this quarry is that they provide a data sheet so we know pretty much what is in the rock; in this case 93% Calcium carbonate. There is a trace of Magnesium, the green schist (serpentine) shows and adds a touch of mystery to this already beautiful stone; and there is some Iron. I've placed it in my very acidic environment; so that and acid rain; I figure it will all disappear in a couple hundred years; fizzzzzz. Pretty cool to think about. On the other side of this quarry is a much grayer stone probably containing more Iron and there are a few striking porphyries of a brick red color. How it all came to be boggles the mind! The Serpentine becomes very apparent just a bit to the east on the upthrust of the Green Mountains. The front rockery is of Plattsburgh stone which is fossiliferous. I don't think the mix of color is everyone's cup of tea -but, for the sake of alpine gardening, that stone just could not go unused! Vermont is, or was, also a big producer of white marble.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 05/21/2012 - 13:18

Bundraba! wrote:

Lori; I'll have to remember to look for the Pulsatilla with the unpronounceable name!

Well, I always collect seeds, so just remind me!


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 05/22/2012 - 09:22

Hoy wrote:

When do you harvest the rhubarb, Lori? I used to make soup of mine. It was a bit bigger though ;D ;)

Thinking on that a bit, guess a bit (a very small bit) of zing to something like cold cucumber soup might actually be good(!)

An excuse to post this pic: our drought that lasted from September through April finally broke a week or so ago.  You can see how the vegetable rhubarb has responded with the more normal leaf size.  However, still not quite as large as they usually are this time of year...

To the right of the rhubarb is a trough with Coryphantha (Escobaria) vivipara from the Rapid City area of South Dakota.  It bloomed a few days ago.

       


Submitted by Peden on Tue, 05/22/2012 - 12:34

More news from my little Lewis Meadows. My favorite glowing salmon colored L. cotyledon is taking the year off but this
white one is doing well. The situation is sandy, fairly moist and I doubt there is any lime or clay. Cold wet does not seem
to bother them but they suffer warm wet. They'll also grow in a mix of peat and (Plagioclase?) Granite if it is moist. I've
had these for over a decade. Sakuasoh, Aubrieta and Aetheonema in background.


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 05/22/2012 - 13:45

RickR wrote:

Hoy wrote:

When do you harvest the rhubarb, Lori? I used to make soup of mine. It was a bit bigger though ;D ;)

Thinking on that a bit, guess a bit (a very small bit) of zing to something like cold cucumber soup might actually be good(!)

Hope you did understand; I would never eat a gem like Lori's Rheum. However mine is - or rather was, I've dug it up to make room for something more precious - huge. Rhubarb is excellent as soup or juice if you are thirsty ;)

Bundraba, your rock garden is marvellous!


Submitted by tropicalgirl25… on Tue, 05/22/2012 - 15:37

Lori wrote:

Bundraba! wrote:

Krish, It looks like you are working with the peat stuff Saxifrage technique I've espoused for years! You are in New England?

Bundraba, Krish is in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, zone 3... a far cry from New England.   :)

sorry Bundraba I forgot to answer about my location. Thanks Lori for that. Like Lori mentioned Saskatoon is very cold and goes upto -40C in winter.Today it is raining here non-stop .


Submitted by tropicalgirl25… on Tue, 05/22/2012 - 15:39

I was trying to highlight the previous posts but it did nor work.

Moderator note:  I fixed it for you, Krish!  I think what you wanted to do was not to highlight, but instead to quote from that other posting.  The easiest way to include a quote from any other posting is to go to that posting, and click on "Quote" in the upper right.  That will open a reply box for you, containing the contents of the other posting as a quote.  You can then delete part of the quote, say if there was only a sentence or two that you wanted to reference, as long as you leave the opening bracketed phrase, and the end bracketed phrase, unchanged.   Then it will come out showing "Quote from...:", with the grey highlighting that you see in the post above this one. :)
Lori


Submitted by Boland on Tue, 05/22/2012 - 18:07

It's been a while since I posted...been busy putting in a new shade garden and painting the deck.  Here are some of my current woodlanders.


Submitted by tropicalgirl25… on Tue, 05/22/2012 - 21:13

Krish wrote:

I was trying to highlight the previous posts but it did nor work.

Moderator note:  I fixed it for you, Krish!   

Thank you Rick.


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Wed, 05/23/2012 - 02:42

Some great plants Todd - oh that we could grow primulas like that! I particularly like the ranunculus and pulsatillas.

Trond I've never heard of making rhubarb soup? Rhubarb crumble is excellent though!


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 05/23/2012 - 03:35

Tim wrote:

Some great plants Todd - oh that we could grow primulas like that! I particularly like the ranunculus and pulsatillas.

Trond I've never heard of making rhubarb soup? Rhubarb crumble is excellent though!

At home my mother made crumble,  soup or mesh (is it the right word? -  soup thickened with flour -). Now we use rhubarb as dessert soup with sugar and milk or as juice. Very nice in hot weather ;)


Submitted by Howey on Wed, 05/23/2012 - 04:47

Attractive, to me, though a bit of a thug, is this Claytonia californica - Mine's Lettuce.  Not sure how it got into my garden.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b


Submitted by Peden on Wed, 05/23/2012 - 07:22

Krish, I should have noted that your introduction mentions your location. Frances; I found something like that miner's lettuce in my front garden this morning; an odd thing. This won't be the first time that some strange little weed has occurred in my garden. I sometimes think that variety spurs yet more variety; or, maybe it's something the birds want there? They watch, you know. We plant; they plant. We pull weeds; they root about too.


Submitted by cohan on Thu, 05/24/2012 - 11:58

Boy, miss a few days with busy-ness, then no internet friday thru monday night, and there is no cactching up  ;D
I can hardly find time to look at the pics, nevermind getting around to mine...lol

If I'm still in the right thread, there was a lovely Ranunculus (Todd), something I liked in Trond's walk, though I can't remember what...lol.. and I'm amazed Lori's Androsace septentrionalis are already flowering! Bundraba, Krish, et all-- so many lovelies :)


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 05/24/2012 - 21:47

An advantage of heading up our Chapter plant sales committee: at the end of the sale, I decide what remaining plants are "worthy" of holding over to the next sale.  Often I will take the orphans home and grow them on through the summer or another year.  Like this Clematis integrifolia:
       

Any guesses as to what this is?
   

Bless its little heart, blooming in a little styrofoam cup!
Anemone multifida 'Annabella Deep Rose'
   

Penstemon hirsutus var. pygmaea
   


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 05/25/2012 - 00:10

Nice orphans, Rick- the Clematis is especially elegant, and nice colour on the Anemone :) I think I got seed of  a similar, hope its still good  :-[


Submitted by Barstow on Fri, 05/25/2012 - 04:25

Howey wrote:

Attractive, to me, though a bit of a thug, is this Claytonia californica - Mine's Lettuce.  Not sure how it got into my garden.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Is this a distinct species? It looks like Claytonia perfoliata.


Submitted by Barstow on Fri, 05/25/2012 - 04:40

Don't see it in the USDA Plants Database, but I've learned that there are different subspecies of C. perfoliata:

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CLPE

...and in FOA: http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=242415745

I grow a variegated form (picture).

But, why are there so few of the North American Claytonias which are in cultivation/ available as seed? The only ones I've managed to get are C. virginica and C. megarhiza.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 05/25/2012 - 05:55

It's a nice time in the gartden which is about to go blue with Moltkia petraea.  Some eriogonums in the crevice gardens are in bloom now.
I like the foliage as much as the flowers


Submitted by Peden on Fri, 05/25/2012 - 07:34

Now that's talk'n to me! Dianthus alpinus from SPARQ/QARGS seed (photo1). The other is Potentilla thurberi, a rather large
plant for the alpine garden but the flower color has heart.

Photo2 is the Blue Mist Penstemon (P. virens).

Photo3; looks like a Chocolate Lily (Fritillaria Camschatensis); but I've planted everything else.

Photo4: Mr. Toad has made himself a nice, cozy toad-hole in the rather prickly 'Pic-Carlit' Fescue: smart toad!

Photo5: Saxifraga; There is Heuchera sanguinea in here and once there was a daisy (one of the Townsendias) that really made
this scene magic.

Photo6 is Geranium richardsonii; a native to North America.

Photo7: This is cute. It doesn't bloom much but cute when it does.

Photo8: Claret Cup.

Photo9: Saponaria rubra.

Keep walk'n!


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Fri, 05/25/2012 - 12:09

I like that garden scene in photo 5 very much - so nice to see plants growing together like this. The penstemon reminds me how striking some of these blue species are - 'Blue Mist Penstemon' has a real ring to it. We used to try a lot of these from seed but our warm and sometimes wet summers were not always to their liking. I really should try again.

My experience of loniceras is very vigorous climbers and huge shrubs! That little plant in Anne's garden looks a real delight by comparison.


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 05/25/2012 - 15:03

RickR wrote:

An advantage of heading up our Chapter plant sales committee: at the end of the sale, I decide what remaining plants are "worthy" of holding over to the next sale.  Often I will take the orphans home and grow them on through the summer or another year.  Like this Clematis integrifolia:

Any guesses as to what this is?

Rick, can't understand that nobody wants these?? They hadn't been leftovers at our arrangement!
The unknown one reminds me of something I've seen - a Campanula?


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 05/25/2012 - 19:49

Hoy wrote:

Rick, can't understand that nobody wants these?? They hadn't been leftovers at our arrangement!

Actually, it was only the clematis pictured here that was a leftover, not the others.  A couple people brought several each, so there was quite a few to choose from.

Hoy wrote:

The unknown one reminds me of something I've seen - a Campanula?

You're the only brave guesser, Trond.
Its a fuzzy bunch of young Martagon lily buds!  (seed grown, of course. ;D)


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 05/25/2012 - 23:22

Rick, how many people attend such Chapter plant sals?

A lily! You fooled me there, Rick!  But I have seen some campanula with similar leaves ;D And actually I have martagon lilies in my garden but can't remember that they are so hairy! - or should I say hoary ;) Do you know the flower colour?


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 05/26/2012 - 00:18

Nice to see the Geranium richardsonii, Bundraba, a common and beloved (by me) native here.. yours doesn't look quite typical of local forms, though I can't quite put my finger on it, and  it could be just lighting and angles...most here, though, are not pure white like yours (I am watching one little colony though, and will try to propagate it), usually have subtle or not subtle pink/purple veining on the petals


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 05/26/2012 - 07:46

Oh My, John!  There is a whole LOT going on there! :o :o :o
A "spot" of color is way too modest.  You could start a new thread on just that garden scene alone!  So the striking red-orange is... what?

Hoy wrote:

Rick, how many people attend such Chapter plant sals?

Ya know, I know we have kept count (or tried to) in the past, but I can't put my finger on it.  For the spring sale, I am thinking about 50 from the Chapter members plus whatever we can pull in from the public.  We hold it in a public park, but the shelter can't be seen from the connecting road or parking lot.

Hoy wrote:

A lily! You fooled me there, Rick!  But I have seen some campanula with similar leaves ;D And actually I have martagon lilies in my garden but can't remember that they are so hairy! - or should I say hoary ;) Do you know the flower colour?

Most martagon buds are not that fuzzy, although some are even more so.  Flower color on that one is a darker mauve-pink.  Here is the same one, four days later:
             

It will be first bloom for this martagon seedling this year:
             


Submitted by Weiser on Sat, 05/26/2012 - 08:18

Rick I assume you are asking about the orange in the bottom, center  of the first picture. The two orange spots of color.
If so, that is an orange red Echinocereus triglochidiatus. Here is a close up from a couple of years ago.


Submitted by Peden on Sat, 05/26/2012 - 09:44

Cohan, the Geranium comes from the Bighorn Mountains quite a bit south of your area. So far all of the seedlings that pop up have been white and I'm wondering if it will cross with any of the other Geraniums in the garden.

John, Great stuff. I'm still trying to do that here!


Submitted by Mark McD on Sat, 05/26/2012 - 15:28

My goodness, I am hopelessly behind... been wanting to respond to this topic numeropus times, and I do enjoy seeing everyone's fine plants and garden views (I like the toad pic). After nearly 3 weeks of traveling and cramming for various"events" at work, I have a breather here on a holiday weekend (Memorial Day here in the USA).

Here are three view of a trough at the end of my driveway, backed up by a garden shed.  The winter-tiny foliage of Alyssum oxycarpum gives away to a small billowing cloud of yellow flower.  I didn't notice last year, but today I noticed an unusual characteristic of this species, the flowers stink.  When I kneeled down to take photographs, I detected the smell of skunk, and I thought to myself "oh no, there might be a skunk moved in under my garden shed", but then realized it was the Alyssum!  What an unusual mal-aroma for an Alyssum to have!  Next to it, in the neighboring trough, is Delosperma 'Tiffindell', now in its third year (seems perfectly hardy).  In the last photo, I show a close-up of two plants near the Alyssum, Globularia repens 'Nana' on the left (from Wrightman's Alpines ), the most minute and concise leaves which are near shiny black all winter, but no flowers this year (only 2 flowers last year), although I would grow it just for the foliage, and Erigeron scopulinus in the center (from Peter George), making a dense mat, but also no flowers this year, only a smattering of flowers last year.


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Sat, 05/26/2012 - 15:45

Do skunks really smell as bad as people say? I am not sure if I dare approach a little Alyssum I have in the front garden! Apparently some teucriums are pretty malodorous too. Curious how once someone tells you then you are tempted to test it for yourself - most people go for roses!

I am interested by the comments about Globularia repens 'Nana'. I have this too and it is a super foliage plant, but like the normal form seems very shy flowering. I rather like this genus even so and also grow G. spinosa and probably my favourite incanescens, which I have just managed to find again from seed.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 05/27/2012 - 21:57

Catching up, yet again...
Paeonia anomala, the first to bloom this year:
 

The little bulbs are done (except for muscari), and the narcissus are having their time:
 

More Pulsatilla turczaninovii - I know I keep showing this one but it is fabulous!  Thank you for the seeds years ago, Rick!
     

Phlox multiflora, again... but this time, it's more "multiflora".  ;D

Myosotis decumbens:


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 05/27/2012 - 22:14

Euphorbia capitulata... showing somewhat more evidence than usual of a rough winter:
 

Paeonia tenuifolia 'Flore Pleno', ready to roll:
 

I think this is Arnica cordifolia... I hope it's not so invasive as another Arnica I'm currently trying to eradicate, that just romps around and never blooms.  (Will I ever learn?  :rolleyes:)
 

Thymus neiceffii:

Pulmonaria vallarsae 'Marjerie Fish':
 

Vanilla-leaf, Achlys triphylla, just leafed out and starting to bloom:

Lush fresh leaves of Peucedanum ostruthium 'Daphnis':


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 05/27/2012 - 22:26

Primula polyneura... or so the seed packet from years ago said anyway:

Primula x juliana 'Jay Jay', battling for space among the bulb foliage:
 

Hacquetia epipactis with Dicentra eximia (? - I always mix this up with D. formosa?):
 

Mertensia ciliata:
 

I never imagined I'd be having to weed out Ligularia seedlings but look at this!

Paeonia intermedia:
 


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 05/27/2012 - 22:41

Dianthus microlepis and Gentiana verna:

Lewisia longipetala, starting to bloom:

Paeonia mlokosewitschii will have 6 flowers this year!

Euphorbia polychroma 'Bonfire':

Aquilegia laramiensis:

Phlox hendersonii:

Clematis alpina 'Constance':
 

Update on Eremostachys speciosa, looking more and more intriguing:
 


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 05/27/2012 - 22:55

Stuart has been referring to this as horseradish ( >:() but it's actually Ligularia macrophylla:
 

Aubrieta canescens:

Lunaria perennis and Lathyrus vernus gracilis:

Valeriana montana, starting to bloom:

Thalictrum thalictroides:

Cerastium alpinum ssp. lanatum, that managed to seed itself up in to a trough with some very prickly company:

Anemone nemorosa 'Vestal':

The last of Adonis vernalis:

Alchemilla alpina erythropoda:


Submitted by Peden on Mon, 05/28/2012 - 01:26

Monday morning greetings of Soapworts and Golden Heathers! The same Golden Heather; Hudsonia ericoides was photographed two days in a row. It will flame out quickly; new flowers each day falling apart before tea time.

I had this thought about the birds, and this one in particular as it is so elegantly colored, that they come to this garden to die (to breed, to steal berries, and to generally pester me); but; perhaps, simply, a cat got it.


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 05/28/2012 - 04:42

It's kinda funny how the wind can whip around the Pulsatilla turczaninovii flowers and rearrange them permanently, until the next group of gales from a different direction rearranges them again.  Almost like an Obedient plant's flowers, except they don't obey me!  Your specimen, Lori, if the coloring is right on my screen, looks intermediary between my most blue flowered plant and a steel gray-blue that I used to have.  (That one mysteriously died.)

Are you sure that is Alchemilla alpina?
Usually with a silver edge, aren't the leaves supposed to be palmately compound and not so heavily toothed?


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 05/28/2012 - 06:15

RickR wrote:

Are you sure that is Alchemilla alpina?
Usually with a silver edge, aren't the leaves supposed to be palmately compound and not so heavily toothed?

Oh right, it's Alchemilla erythropoda.  Thank you!


Submitted by cohan on Mon, 05/28/2012 - 12:41

Lori, esp love the Euph capitulata and Achlys :)
I was surprised some bits of Haquetia I planted last fall just emerged in the last week/few days- so far behind some of the other things (Cory, Anemones, Dentaria)I thought they weren't coming at all, so I was very pleased to see them!

Bundraba- love the Hudsonia! I don't remember if I have seed from Kristl, or just thought about it...
Colourful bird!


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 05/28/2012 - 15:07

Lori wrote:

Catching up, yet again...

More Pulsatilla turczaninovii - I know I keep showing this one but it is fabulous!  Thank you for the seeds years ago, Rick!

Lori, you have loads of gems and interesting plants! But I agree, P turczaninovii certainly is fabulous! Is it possible to ask for seed if you have some to offer later?


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 05/28/2012 - 21:02

Spiegel wrote:

Does the Myosotis decumbens stay small for you?

Yes, the elongated flower stems get to about 5cm max.

cohan wrote:

I was surprised some bits of Haquetia I planted last fall just emerged in the last week/few days- so far behind some of the other things (Cory, Anemones, Dentaria)I thought they weren't coming at all, so I was very pleased to see them!

Great news, Cohan!

Yes, I always do collect seed from whatever pulsatillas bloom for me, and I'll send you some P. turczaninovii when they are ready, Trond.

Too bad about the dead cedar waxwing, Bundraba... but at least it allows us a close-up view of the beauty.  Cedar waxwings have been busy eating apple petals in our trees, and trilling their songs.  Stuart managed to get a photo of some out the window... (fuzzy but better than any of my bird pics!)

Arenaria kansuensis, with a few buds; this one is looking pristine but another specimen is half brown.

Iris timofejewii and Iris chamaeiris:
 

Scopiola carniolica:
   


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 05/29/2012 - 00:09

Two more nice irises :)
Interesting about the waxwings eating petals- that I haven't noticed, though our crabs/apples draw all sorts of other predatory attention- grouse eating fruit then buds in later fall, moose eating all tender stems in winter, etc.... I suppose if they just pull petals it wouldn't affect fruiting?
However, the waxwings do make a strong appearance as soon as any berries are ripe- I went out to harvest some Shepherdia canadensis on the acreage last year, only to hear the waxwings in the bush ahead of me, where they'd nearly stripped every bush to be found (and there are many, in numerous spots); they routinely clear saskatoons (Amelanchier) and Sorbus as well, usually almost immediately..


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Tue, 05/29/2012 - 01:32

I'm with everyone else on the wonderful variety of plants pictured. The pulsatilla is especially nice; I have grown this in the past on the nursery but never had the chance to establish it in the garden - it is very distinctive and elegant.

I couldn't resist putting a picture of the daisies in our lawn - ever since we visited a friend whose lawn was almost all daisies in early summer we have tried to encourage them too. In the sand bed a new range of plants are flowering:-

Penstemon rupicola 'Conwy Rose' (a selection from Aberconwy Nursery in North Wales)
Onosma echioides. These I have always found short lived but hope the sand bed will be more to their liking
Hypericum cerastoides. A reliable and cheerful species. There are many very good alpine species in the genus
Triteleia ixioides. After the spring bulbs have done their thing this really comes into it's own in early summer
Thymus 'Peter Davis'. A striking thyme named for the renowned botanist. It flowers so freely we have trouble getting any propagating material from it!
Astragalus angustifolius. The only one of this huge and diverse genus that we grow at present, although I have young plants of many others coming on from seed. This one though (from Greece) is a good doer in the garden. Others I have found a lot more tricky.


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 05/29/2012 - 06:27

cohan wrote:

Interesting about the waxwings eating petals- that I haven't noticed, though our crabs/apples draw all sorts of other predatory attention- grouse eating fruit then buds in later fall, moose eating all tender stems in winter, etc.... I suppose if they just pull petals it wouldn't affect fruiting?

No, it doesn't seem to affect fruit production (wouldn't mind if it did, as we always have far too many apples anyway).  They just pluck and eat the petals, not the whole flowers or the stamens/pistils.


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 05/29/2012 - 09:29

Surprisingly not flattened by the 3+ inches of rain we have had in the last few days, Allium moly:
             

Phyteuma orbiculare.  Each flower is always subtended by one very long single bract.  
       

       

A species Hemerocallis.I hadn't noticed before the small white protuberances at the end of the sepals that point forward.  How odd...
             

Not a photo worthy of discussion, but I thought I had gotten rid of Penstemon pinifolius 'Mersea Yellow'. It is growing better now than when I tried to grow it!  Second Pic: Pentemon whippleanus (thanks for the seed, Lori!)
       

Clematis integrifolia
             


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 05/29/2012 - 11:44

Nice lawn Tim! One thing I like about our large mowed area (necessary to keep the forest from closing in), while it does have many weeds I'd rather be without- dandelions and clovers etc, I am very happy that its also full of wildflowers- right now lots of Viola adunca, fewer V renifolia, a couple of different Antennarias, some in flower, and Maianthemum canadense in bud..

The Onosma is very charming!


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Tue, 05/29/2012 - 12:53

Thanks Cohan - I'd be happy to establish such a range of wildflowers in the grass. In part of the garden I am doing this with bulbs but it is quite a long term project (also saves on the mowing!).

Rick - is there much variation in Penstemon pinifolius grown in the US? We had a very robust form called 'Wisley Flame'. Here it is one of the most reliable penstemons in the garden but I have had the same poor experience as you with 'Mersea Yellow'.


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 05/29/2012 - 20:54

Tim wrote:

Rick - is there much variation in Penstemon pinifolius grown in the US?

I nave no idea. 

I have the species, too, growing right next to Mersea Yellow, and it does better, but not by a lot.


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 05/29/2012 - 22:35

Tim, I can't take any credit for our 'flower lawn'  --our yard was never really true lawn- before our first house here was built in the early '70's, this property was just a mostly wooded pasture area on one corner of the family farm- the native vegetation was never removed, though of course it was affected by the grazing livestock (which just passed through this small part of the native wooded pasture on the farm) and the later building and installation etc; over the decades since, the native plants on the acreage have spread to most of the acreage, mixed with grasses ( I confess to mostly not knowing which grasses are native and which are forage escapes or from my mom's early seeding efforts here) and common agricultural weeds..
Since taking over mowing when I moved back (I don't do all the mowing, but I'm the one who says- don't mow there!) I've encouraged the wildflowers more by leaving some areas around trees, shrubs and stumps to become little islands with more full grown plants, and try to enjoy the flowers more by mowing around flowering plants when possible, even if they will be mowed at other times...

Right now, of course, dandelions are hitting their peak, so there is more yellow than anything!


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 05/30/2012 - 04:00

Tim, I like your flowering lawn too! I have just mowed mine - first time this season  ;)
I also like the Onosma! If it is short lived, does it produce seed?

Rick, surprisingly I could do with some rain! It has been very dry here for some weeks - a dry (cold) wind from north suck the moisture out of everything and the layer of soil is thin.
Both Penstemons are nice. I have started trying new species now  :)

Here are some of my peonies flowering now.

P rockii, delavayi and delavayi lutea, all from seed.


Submitted by Peden on Wed, 05/30/2012 - 08:05

A walk in 'Cactus Park': Photo1: the green leafy thing just above Cerastium tomentosum is Campanula glomerata (which will bloom) growing through Phlox subulata which is past blooming. By now you may be thinking: thugs! But, this; bottom and right planting (The gravel area is newer); has looked pretty much just like this for ten years or more. The Plants are kept in check by furrowing between the mats. Apparently, The Campanula just runs around in there without too much malicious intent. At left is Stephanandra, which could be a problem soon if the scene is not to go much scaled upward!
And, at right there is a Teucrium (not yet blooming) which is dangerously welded into place. Can I trust it to be as nice as the Campanula as it swiftly eats ground?

At the bottom of photo2 is Sphaeralcea coccinea.

At the bottom of photo3 is Artemisia stelleriana; at the top is a bridal veil Spirea, the only plant in the photo that came with the house when I bought it many years ago.

In photo4 is Erigeron flagellaris and one of those rather fast Artemisias. The Colchicum will senesce in a not unpleasant way.

John; your "little spot of color" noted here. But the palette will be different and there won't be any Chollas.

At bottom of photo6 are the remnants of an ancient and formerly huge Astragalus angustifolius. Just up is a good Eriogonum from Abajo Peak in Utah; they don't all bloom like this and winter burn is an issue in the Northeast; but big bearded Iris do great in my garden not withstanding that these were photographed just before the storm!

To make short the story, this Iris was being extirpated from its former home as ugly. So here lives ugly (photo7).

Photo8 is an old planting of Allium moly, 'Tiny Rubies' Dianthus, Sedum aizoon (?), and Polypodium vulgare.

Here's a couple from 'The Rock': Soapworts and Allysum oxycarpum. Mark; you may want to check your shed (carefully) these A. o. don't smell like skunk!

Photo10; Convolvulus boissieri blossoms only last for a day, but I've seen this plant fairly covered with them. It will even set seeds here.


Submitted by Weiser on Wed, 05/30/2012 - 10:30

Love all of the mats of color! Your garden is a glory of color!
Nice cactus garden! Is that a clustering Pediocactus in the upper center of your bed? What ever it is, it certainly looks happy.
The buns and baby cactus in your last two photos are very nice indeed.

Great show!


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Wed, 05/30/2012 - 11:19

I second John's comments; those last two pictures especially are really attractive - you can imagine them in the wild. Great to see gardening with alpines like this!


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 05/30/2012 - 11:47

Great garden, MichaelP (nice to have a name :) Also nice to see the ways the plants interact (especially in a nice established garden like yours) as well as individual portraits..


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 05/30/2012 - 15:03

You really have a nice garden, Michael! Some plants are familiar but some are not ;) Some do grow in my garden and a lot of them don't ;D I do not think they'll survive either :-\


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 05/30/2012 - 19:48

I forgot to mention the peonies, Trond- nice! We have several oldish ones here, which are all more or less pink and more less fully double (quadruple?)while I like them well enough,  I do appreciate some of the simpler ones, and peonies in any colour other than pale pink :)


Submitted by Mark McD on Thu, 05/31/2012 - 20:27

Bundraba! wrote:

Here's a couple from 'The Rock': Soapworts and Allysum oxycarpum. Mark; you may want to check your shed (carefully) these A. o. don't smell like skunk!

I can assure you, my Alyssum oxycarpum has flowers that smell skunky; I do believe I can tell the difference when sticking my nose in the actual flowers that the flowers are the source of the skunky scent, versus an aroma that might be eminating from under a shed, it isn't that difficult an observation. There are plant species (I know of some Allium species) where nearly identical plants, but from different known sources, will show different scent characteristics, one will be odorous, and the other will be inodorous.


Submitted by Peden on Sat, 06/02/2012 - 11:46

Thanks all for the nice compliments on the garden walk.

John, yes it is a clustering Pedio. The center rotted, or began to and the thing split!

Tim, it is interesting that the two sections of the garden I posted last are so different and that both "themes" -dryland; and cushion steppe -are obviously to some degree doable here. I can't help but wonder how either would appear on a much grander scale.


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 06/02/2012 - 14:38

You have a nice place, Palustris.How big is your property?  And yes, I recognized most of the species ;)

Here are some pics from my (very untidy) garden yesterday:

I suddenly noticed that the asphodel (Asphodelus albus) had started flowering in a crab apple!
It is the shrubs that dominate: Rhododendrons, Pieris, Enkianthus(and peonies) . . . .


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 06/03/2012 - 12:31

Michael, that is a beauty!
Palustris, I'll have to wait for a stronger internet time to check the link..lol

Trond- some nice views! I only have a vague idea at best of what I am seeing, esp in the last view, but nice! Better shrubs dominating than the sea of yellow I have right now  ;D


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 06/03/2012 - 20:30

Beautiful, Trond!

Draba kitadakensis and Thymus neiceffii:

Hellebore, that's been blooming for a long time now:

Primula polyneura:

Paeonia mlokosewitchii:

The narcissus are down to the last few... a trio of Narcissus poeticus:

Viola canadensis:

Omphalodes verna and Rheum palmatum var. tanguticum:

Phlox cultivar:

Phlox bifida:

Erigeron pinnatisectus:


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 06/03/2012 - 20:41

Penstemon nitidus:
 

This time of year is so wonderfully fragrant, with the trees in bloom...
Malus 'Royalty':
 

Ornamental crabapple:
 

Sour cherry, Prunus cerastus 'Evans':
 

Chokecherry, Prunus virginiana 'Schubert' (the leaves turn purple later on):
 


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 06/03/2012 - 20:45

Clematis alpina - a seedling ex. 'Pamela Jackman' that turned out to have white flowers:

Linum sp. and spent flowers of Muscari:

One of the first Aquilegia canadensis:


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 06/04/2012 - 13:48

Lori, you certainly have some beauties yourself! And despite your later start you are ahead of me now. Your warmer days have brought you in front in great strides ;)

Here a cold desiccating wind from north makes it almost as cold as February :( As I have said before: We have two seasons, one long spring and one long fall mixed with a few wintry days almost anytime and a few warm days anytime from April to October.


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 06/04/2012 - 18:51

After a couple of false starts from seed batches, I think I finally may have the real Pensteomon nitidus.  I picked up a couple seedlings from our Chapter plant sale, and so far they look like the real thing.  Lori, I hope they look as nice as yours or John's someday. :o 

My supposed Penstemon pocerus seedling is blooming... I am very pleased, even though it is not procerus.

             


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 06/05/2012 - 02:25

I would be pleased if I had a blue Penstemon! Last year I sowed several different batches of seed but all the seedling looked very similar though. I planted them out but none has started flowering yet.


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 06/05/2012 - 22:45

RickR wrote:

My supposed Penstemon pocerus seedling is blooming... I am very pleased, even though it is not procerus.

Nice one, nonetheless, Rick!  One would think it should be readily identifiable with the combination of serrated leaves and blue flowers?  I'm sure Mr. Nold would know it right off!


Submitted by Peden on Wed, 06/06/2012 - 07:25

I once had Penstemon nitidus with Tulip 'Little Princess'; absolutely sublime; both are now gone but the Penstemon, at least, WILL get tried again!

On June 1 I walked in the gardens of others. The first four photographs were taken at Cady's Falls Nursery: The next four at Rocky Dale Gardens; in my opinion two of the finest gardens in the region. The last two were taken from the ferry on my returning approach to Essex New York.


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 06/06/2012 - 14:13

Yes, very beautiful! Would love to take a walk there too ;)

I had a little walk in my untidy garden yesterday, and here are some of the plants flowering now (actually rhododendrons still are the dominant genus).

Allium triquetrum and the native ursinum do a good show in the shady woodland. They are rather common but their white flowers light up the gloomy forest floor.

     

In a more open place the dark Phyteuma ovatum and the purpur Menziesia ciliicalyx var purpurea grow together and on a dry wall another native, Sedum reflexum, soon flower.

       


Submitted by AmyO on Wed, 06/06/2012 - 19:04

Bundraba! wrote:

I once had Penstemon nitidus with Tulip 'Little Princess'; absolutely sublime; both are now gone but the Penstemon, at least, WILL get tried again!

On June 1 I walked in the gardens of others. The first four photographs were taken at Cady's Falls Nursery: The next four at Rocky Dale Gardens; in my opinion two of the finest gardens in the region. The last two were taken from the ferry on my returning approach to Essex New York.

Hey Michael...I wish I had known you came to Rocky Dale Gardens!! I work there and would have loved to give you an official tour! The next time you make your way across Lake Champlain let me know, it would great to meet you. and I so agree the Rocky Dale and Cady's Falls are the best nurseries in the northeast!!


Submitted by cohan on Thu, 06/07/2012 - 12:01

Michael- looks like a nice day for a tour of some lovely gardens!

Trond- nice things happening in your garden- love the Alliums- I've been slightly aware of some woodland Alliums, but don't have any yet- all I have is many square metres of A schoenoprasum!
Love the vignette of the Phyteuma and Menziesia too :)


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Thu, 06/07/2012 - 13:59

Trond - great combination of phyteuma and menziesia with the fern in the background. Funny how you always wish for the plants you can't grow; I've always been fascinated by a lot of the smaller ericaceae and would love to grow, for example, Loiseluria procumbens, a great memory from visiting Iceland very many years ago. Now if somebody would write a book on these wonderful plants ...?!


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 06/07/2012 - 14:34

I may have to ask for seed of A. triquetrum and ursinum, Trond.  I am not too crazy about the angular stem, but really like the triquetrum flowers.  I'll never know if they are hardy here unless I try them.  Do they go dormant in summer?


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 06/07/2012 - 21:36

Hoy wrote:

In a more open place the dark Phyteuma ovatum and the purpur Menziesia ciliicalyx var purpurea grow together...

That's a very striking picture, Trond!


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 06/08/2012 - 03:42

Thank you, folks ;)
I'll collect seeds, Rick. They have a tendency to stay green the whole summer and are often very early with leaves in spring in mild spells.

Lori wrote:

Hoy wrote:

In a more open place the dark Phyteuma ovatum and the purpur Menziesia ciliicalyx var purpurea grow together...

That's a very striking picture, Trond!

Yes, Lori, you can see all the weeds!


Submitted by Peden on Fri, 06/08/2012 - 07:28

A Penstemon seedling growing where a burgundy form of P. whippleanus and a pink form of P. arizonicus once grew.

A couple of afternoon's ago I walked out and saw this little spectacle and this wasn't the only Escobaria vivipara that decided it was a good day to bloom -like they all got together and discussed the best way to draw in bees.

A little bun cluster: Eriogonum flavum 'xanthum' (reclassified recently I believe), Dianthus haematocalyx subsp. pindicola, and Areneria species 'Wallowa Mountains'.

I wasn't kidding when I said I planted wheat. The blue flower is a very nice big bearded Iris. Now, as sometimes the artists critique of his own work is appreciated, notice the composition of this image -the wheat in the foreground vying with the iris in the center for attention; color, aspect and form. The whole creating an interesting vertical element in the photo. I took one with the Iris off to the side; but not as interesting. Note also the interesting rotation set up by the Penstemon in the first photo and carried through in the blue Aquilegia and other plants behind it.

It's been over a decade since I grew one of the little peas this well giving 2012 distinction as the year the little peas returned to my garden. This one normally lights up the roadside in Northwestern Wyoming and there, is probably capable of producing more than a few 'stop the car!' moments.


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 06/08/2012 - 20:43

Krish wrote:

Today I took pictures of some plants blooming  in the garden. Not as nice as Michaels.

But they are special, just the same.  Very nice, healthy, well grown plants, Krish!


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 06/09/2012 - 00:32

Michael- I have seeds of some fancy heirloom wheat I bought to plant as an ornamental (and for any birds interested) It just hasn't happened yet!

Krish- the Dodecatheon are painting some ditches pink here right now- it always happens that they start and I see them from the car but am not able to make an excursion to photograph them until they are past their prime :( Hopefully this same wet weather that will keep me from getting out on the bike will keep them fresh, since its also chilly!


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 06/09/2012 - 09:55

Very nice, Krish!  It looks like your Primula vialii has access to the moisture it would probably want.  How long have you had them there?  I've had them survive a couple or three years only, in our dry soil (and have given up on growing it long ago)... I never bothered to create the environment it would probably need to give it a chance of longer term survival.

More mouth-watering photos from your superb garden, Michael!  Keep 'em coming!


Submitted by tropicalgirl25… on Sat, 06/09/2012 - 16:47

Hi Lori the Primula vialli I got from Canadian Tire one month ago.It was in a sad state when I bought it.As soon as I planted at one end of the stream it was happy.The one next to it is Primula rosea I germinated from NARGs seeds last year.It grew well in a different section and had only one flower this year. I took a piece of it and planted near viali.


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Sun, 06/10/2012 - 00:51

Now that is a sight for sore eyes Trond! I have tried Clintonia andrewsiana several times but never managed to establish it. It must like the cooler Scandinavian climate. Such distinctive flowers.


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 06/11/2012 - 00:09

Tim wrote:

Now that is a sight for sore eyes Trond! I have tried Clintonia andrewsiana several times but never managed to establish it. It must like the cooler Scandinavian climate. Such distinctive flowers.

It definitely likes it where it is growing now, anyway. I had another plant - much smaller though but still it flowered reliably - but it was shaded out by a rhododendron. I have to keep an eye on this one as the neighbours are greedy and spreading . . . .

Here is the whole plant by the way, forgot to post it. I do like the leaves too! They have spots of shed petals from a rowan tree.


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 06/11/2012 - 08:36

Leaves are very similar to our native Clintonia borealis, except ours seldom grows more than two or three leaves.

Trond, your stylophorum in the pic prompts an observation:  I have always known S. diphyllum to look like this:

             

Isn't it interesting that such a wide variation in the wild occurs.


Submitted by Peden on Mon, 06/11/2012 - 09:55

Another first in this garden for 2012; I was surprised and (extremely) delighted to find Aquilegia jonesii had suddenly pushed a flower! Ask not what is the blue glow in the center of obscurity: look it over! From seed collected in the Bighorn mountains in 2009.

Last bloomer Rhodo; Rhododendron chionoides backs up a firecracker Penstemon. These Penstemons like the Northeast USA. I have two sorts here and wish to improve seed set so that there may be more in the days to come. PEB's (Penstemon eating bugs) are one of the vial reproaches to my desire. The weather is, of course, another but our summer can be like that on the peaks of the Southwest where these naturally grow: fickle and apt to be wet.

Sempervivum ciliosum is a top rate wall plant IMO. This thing grows on air, and rock too.

And as the rock garden fades into summer: a mini-rose stands guard.

Peonies are a poor choice for acid sand but I plant them anyway. Four miles south they grow splendidly; something for geologists to fathom. Iris 'Super Ego' at hint in this picture is rather better here than the Peony but it is so nice when they get together. All the Peonys in my garden took a huge hit in the "spring" of 2011; they aren't aquatics. I lost, and probably will not replace, some rather nice tree peonies.

At the bottom of the picture is Liatris spicata. It will bloom later. The rock garden is going over but the garden season does not ever go over.

This is Vaccinium oxycoccus 'Wright Peak', a very choice ground covering plant. The Empetrum at the top of the photo is also from the Adirondack Mountains.

Campanula muralis, Thyme; a nicely colored form, and Aruncus aethusifolius.


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 06/11/2012 - 14:05

Michael, you have some exiting plants! I think the peonies do good at your place to ;)

RickR wrote:

Leaves are very similar to our native Clintonia borealis, except ours seldom grows more than two or three leaves.

Trond, your stylophorum in the pic prompts an observation:  I have always known S. diphyllum to look like this:

Isn't it interesting that such a wide variation in the wild occurs.

Rick, this time the variation is more than usual! It is an entirely different species! The yellowflowered plant accompanying the Clintonia is the very weedy perennial Meconopsis cambrica. It is showy when in flower (like now) but sprout like cress everywhere. But I agree, the flower is very similar to S. diphyllum and the leaves too.

I have tried to get Stylophorum diphyllum but it always turns out to be S. lasiocarpum! Here it is with my toes as a meassure.
The seedpods belong to Helleborus foetidus.


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 06/11/2012 - 20:44

Hoy wrote:

Rick, this time the variation is more than usual! It is an entirely different species!

Too funny!  My initial thought was that it was a different species, too.  But when I started googling around, I convinced myself that I would be foolish posting such a suggestion.  Look where that got me...(Where is our blushing emoticon?)


Submitted by Peden on Tue, 06/12/2012 - 09:47

Change is afoot on Cactus Park. The cactuses really steal the show for a time. Opuntia flowers are good for a day but don't detract a whole lot from the new blossoms after they're done. Opuntia is a strong and willing genus here but my garden holds just a scant few; no particular reason for that, I guess, just that there's an awful lot of plants one can collect (and real estate seems to be becoming more and more dear)! It might also be said that Opuntias are rather "standoffish"; a stern hand is useful when dealing with them. But, as other less adventurous gardeners may be settling in to the cool greens of shade gardening; I'm pretty happy right here.

This is Opuntia 'Claude Arno' putting on a decent show; but I've seen it buried in these pink chalices.

I showed the bun cluster in a previous post; the cactus is O. 'Red Glory'

Bailey's Lace Cactus is freer of bloom than the Claret Cup here; at least so far. All of the Bailey's Lace Cactus shown here were grown from seeds produced by two parents. That's right; years ago on a visit to Santa-Fe greenhouses; I bought the pot with two plants in it. They are both still doing fine.

Salvia takes a blue cue from Veronica and carries it into summer. Salvia officianalis (culinary sage), among Artemisia here, has to be among the most unsung of all ornamental perennials. I grew these from seed; how else to get it?

   

I thought I might use these as ground cover but they respond quite differently to the garden's conditions than Opuntia does. That said: I'm still after "plan A".


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 06/12/2012 - 23:01

Trond- the Clintonia is striking- not a colour I'd expect!

Michael- nice cactus show!
I was thinking about your z4b- doesn't sound so much different than our z3 ( though I still have some skepticism about even calling us z3) but the 4 1/2 months frost free sounds very different! We hope for mostly frost free in June (though were I planting anything really tender, which mostly I don't bother doing) I'd probably wait till a week into June.. July is pretty safe, but by mid-August all bets are off! There is frost in every month in the record, and a couple years ago, many areas in the province had summer frosts, though we were okay here. All the more reason to grow alpines and northern plants that couldn't care less about about a few degrees below freezing!


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Wed, 06/13/2012 - 10:48

Great how one plant sets off another - the salvia and artemisia. Cacti are a bit more independant though! All I can think of seeing those opuntias is a cowboy standing on one in a spaghetti western - obviously not in flower, he might have noticed it otherwise! Really nice plants.


Submitted by Peden on Thu, 06/14/2012 - 09:15

Ha Tim! No cowboy in cactus garden but there was a pretty nice cow skull there for a while. Its that "something" about cactuses that inspires silliness. Recently I've taken to a more subdued approach.

Krish; those look like pretty happy plants: No lily beetle yet? That scourge showed up here for the first time last spring, adding insult to injury. The Dianthus was grown from SPARQ/QARGS seed labeled as D. haematocalyx subspecies pindicola.

As further comment on the "season" here: "Alpines" greatly expand the gardening season. I'm out in the garden two months before "normal" gardeners wake up and still at it more than a month after they pack up. I expect this season to be unprecedented (to my knowledge). It began before mid March with snowdrops etc. and should go into November with bloom/seed on the Ozawa onion (A. thunbergii).


Submitted by Howey on Fri, 06/15/2012 - 04:40

Michael, you speak of the Lily Beetle.  I no longer see it on my morning garden walk, nor do I see any lilies except one white Martagon that seemed to escape them.  At first I just squished them on sight but now have a bottle containing a few of them to take up to an entomologist at the University for research.  Initially, I noticed they were eating each other, so I tossed in a mutilated lily bud and they are still moving around in there.  What buds the bugs didn't get, the robins in the bird bath nearby finished off to get at the bugs.  So, regarding lilies, it's been a disappointing year.  A friend suggested using Neem to get rid of them?  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b


Submitted by Toole on Sat, 06/16/2012 - 05:24

Sounds like the Lily bettle is a real pain --i hope it never makes it's way 'down under'.

Spotted this bit of colour in one of the pots today --way too early i'm thinking as the plants of this in the ground here don't normally appear for another month or so.......

Adonis amuriensis.

Cheers Dave.


Submitted by Peden on Sat, 06/16/2012 - 08:58

"All come to look for America".

At one point I took preference over Sedum sexangular as being, perhaps, less invasive than Sedum acre but as particularities fade I'm not sure there's much difference. Sedums can provide (big) color not oft seen in planned ground covers; check 'em out. The blue is Campanula muralis.

Probably not too many advanced gardeners; rock or otherwise; would disagree that foliage and form are the better part of the exercise. Here Areneria tetraquetra meets Areneria 'Wallowa' and a Sempervivum ('Silver Thaw' -purchased on a trip to Maine) is wondering what's next.

A. franchetianum likes America.

Pert and perky just look'n the joint over: Arisaema flavum.

Here on The Rock; Moltkia petraea blue; certainly among the choicest of rock garden plants. I shuddered when this one seeded in on top of a trial Gypsophila aretioides; but I let it be: a fair trade. These are willing, and deeply beautiful plants. Grown from NARGS seed.

Saxifraga cochlearifolia in splendid light.

Iris 'Good Omen' on camera. May all of your gardens sparkle, and so inspire wandering.


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 06/16/2012 - 16:43

Krish, is that Echium russicum that I see?  Mine was done blooming a week ago.
Edit: Nevermind.  I see you identified it as E. amoenum in another thread.

Michael, I really like your Arisaema flavum. Years ago, our Chapter went on a summer roadtrip that took us into Iowa.  We stopped at a really out-of-the-way nursery that specialized in alpines amidst miles and miles of only farmland.  It had a whole greenhouse of Arisaema species, too.  After we had made our purchases, the Chapter was given a dozen or so each of A. flavum, fargesii and candidum.  (He had way too many.)  "See if you can get these to grow up there" he said.  They were very healthy, 1 foot tall plants.  All succumb, but A. flavum lasted he longest, limping through four summers and three winters.

I don't think your photo is Arisaema franchetianum.  http://efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200027201
But it does look just like the "A. franchetianum" that I received from Chen Yi many years ago.  don't have a clue what it really is...

Sedum sexangulare is a weed at our Rock garden at the MN Arboretum.  The staff there grows it as a ground cover right across the walk path from our rock garden. :rolleyes:  It does set off nicely the potted bonsai displayed there, though.  Fortunately, the path is asphalt, so the sedum is not a terrible problem.  I think I'd "choose" S. sexangulare over S. acre any day of the year.


Submitted by Mark McD on Sat, 06/16/2012 - 20:16

RickR wrote:

I don't think your photo is Arisaema franchetianum.  http://efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200027201
But it does look just like the "A. franchetianum" that I received from Chen Yi many years ago.  don't have a clue what it really is...

I agree Rick, on both accounts... love Arisaema flavum, tried it a couple times, but have not succeeded yet, and the first Arisaema isn't franchetianum, but a really lovely narrow and elegant dissected leaf Arisaema... I too wonder what it is.  Here's a photo of A. franchetianum from the International Aroid Society; a species with 3 bold and wide leaflets, and a distinctive flower.
http://www.aroid.org/genera/arisaema/franchetianum/15.php


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 06/16/2012 - 22:02

It just so happened that a botany friend of mine from Hayward, Wisconsin visited me today.  He grows lots of things I never would think had a prayer: Meconopsis grows like weeds, Stewartia from seed just planted in the woods(!), a vining polyganatum, Iris wattii, etc.  We got to talking about arisaema and he mentioned that he has had A. flavum for at least ten years!  He is in zone 3, and about 50 miles south of Lake Superior.  Often he benefits from lake effect snowfall, but not all years.  From my point of view, this guy can grow anything, and he is a master at rooting cuttings, too!


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 06/16/2012 - 23:29

Arisaema flavum does indeed seem very hardy.  Mine seemed to have gone AWOL last year, though, after 7 years in the garden.  

Now for something completely different... a few of the roses in Stuart's greenhouse.  All are specifically selected for fragrance (as well as for form and disease resistance) - and the fragrance is, indeed, intoxicating!

'Double Delight'; 'Dolly Parton'; 'Sheila's Perfume'; 'Rock'n'Roll';  'Full Sail':
       

And Rosa primula, outdoors - no coddling needed for that one!


Submitted by Gene Mirro on Sun, 06/17/2012 - 10:46

Michael, I think your A. franchetianum is really A. ciliatum.  I have a few that I grew from seed labelled as ciliatum, and they look just like yours.  Also, the photos on Google look the same.


Submitted by externmed on Sun, 06/17/2012 - 14:14

Massachusetts sandy bed still holds some interest.  Acantholimon, Sempervivum, and Lewisia rediviva Sold as v. minor.  This is first year for the latter, but 2 made it through last year and flowered, earlier.
Charles Swanson NE Massachusetts USA z6a "mildish" sunny winter, recently cloudy and cool, 90s F this week.


Submitted by externmed on Sun, 06/17/2012 - 14:26

Here on The Rock; Moltkia petraea blue; certainly among the choicest of rock garden plants. I shuddered when this one seeded in on top of a trial Gypsophila aretioides; but I let it be: a fair trade. These are willing, and deeply beautiful plants. Grown from NARGS seed.

Michael, those "on the rock" garden scenes are outstanding.  Hope you'll post to the Gallery: Rock Garden Scenes.
Charles Swanson


Submitted by Peden on Mon, 06/18/2012 - 08:47

Thanks for the feed back; particularly for the Arisaemas. I'm pretty sure both came from Potterton and Martin many years ago. Both have been in the garden for over ten years. A. flavum has seeded quite a bit and there's lots of wee ones. The other spreads widely by stolons but has also produced fruit. If the seeds mature before cold weather; I haven't seen any seedlings yet. It's a genus I really have yet to explore. As for Stewartia; It took two seasons before seeds germinated.


Submitted by Mark McD on Mon, 06/18/2012 - 20:33

RickR wrote:

It just so happened that a botany friend of mine from Hayward, Wisconsin visited me today.  He grows lots of things I never would think had a prayer: Meconopsis grows like weeds, Stewartia from seed just planted in the woods(!), a vining polyganatum, Iris wattii, etc.  We got to talking about arisaema and he mentioned that he has had A. flavum for at least ten years!  He is in zone 3, and about 50 miles south of Lake Superior.  Often he benefits from lake effect snowfall, but not all years.  From my point of view, this guy can grow anything, and he is a master at rooting cuttings, too!

I believe many Stewartia are hardy, a number of species can be grown in New England without the slightest winterkill over many years.  If I had to pick only two trees to grow, Stewartia pseudocamellia is one of the two (Sourwoord, or Oxydendron arboreum is the other).  It used to be that my tree never started blooming until the very end of June or beginning of July.  But in the past decade, flowering start date has consistently moved up, earlier and earlier, the first few blooms started here on June 8th.  This past week, the maturing tree is heavily laden with large flowers, quite a spectacle in the garden, the ground white from the flowers that drop just after one day, replaced by ever more opening buds.  

This tree is an all-season winner, trim, concise deep green leaves never bothered by buds, smart red leaf petioles, upright conical growth with willowy slightly pendulous branch ends, incredible profusion of late-season bloom, spectacular red-orange-pink autumn color, and beautiful smooth multi-color peeling bark for winter interest.  The only thing this tree lacks, is flowers with a fragrance (they're unscented, although the bulblebees love the tree).  This tree has never seeded around in 18 or so years, whereas other ornamental such as Magnolia, Stryax, and recently Chionanthus, seed around with ease.

Stewartia pseudocamellia
 

Another late bloomer is Magnolia sieboldii (mine is a Korean form grown from Magnolia Society seed).  I mentioned in another topic about Winners and Losers, that when we were hit with a deep freeze to 18 F after several weeks of summer-like warm to hot weather back in March, one of my two M. sieboldii trees completely blackened.  It never recovered and has indeed died, whereas the second tree growing 2' away, didn't bat an eye at the sudden deep freeze, and is growing lustily and producing lots of flowers.  The flowers, besides being exquisite, have a rich perfume, an enticing sweet lemony scent.  Nearby grows Corydalis elata, 18"-24" tall with deep blue flowers that waft an intoxicating sweet coconut aroma, mmmMMMMmmmm good!

Magnolia sieboldii "Korean form"


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 06/18/2012 - 23:07

Lots of beautiful things there, Charles and Mark!

Doronicum orientale; Salvia juriscii, with its upside-down flowers; Antennaria along the sidewalk:
     

Castilleja miniata in the front yard; there is one particularly vivid plant that I'm glad to see has seeded itself:
 

I grew this from seed long ago as Anemone x lesseri:
 

Anemone canadensis - pretty in bloom but very invasive:

Eremurus himalaicus - I broke this one off last year under the soil surface while weeding and assumed I'd killed it - not so:


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 06/18/2012 - 23:12

Lupinus nootkatensis, looking more blue in the photo than it really is:

A sucker or seedling of Lupinus argenteus has turned out to have pink flowers, as opposed to the usual lavender (on the right):
   

Dianthus sp. in front yard:


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 06/19/2012 - 00:23

Lori, interesting how your season starts so much sooner than mine, but in our short summer things become compressed and we are not as far behind on some things now- Anemone canadensis and Castilleja miniata have just started floweri