South African Bulbs 2015

Submitted by Fermi on Wed, 02/11/2015 - 00:26

The clump of cerise Amaryllis belladonna has come into flower a bit earlier than last year but only one of the others is also in bloom,

cerise Amaryllis belladonna cerise Amaryllis belladonna cerise Amaryllis belladonna cerise Amaryllis belladonna

cheers

fermi

Comments


Submitted by Fermi on Wed, 02/25/2015 - 18:40

One of the white flowered Amaryllis belladonna is now in bloom

white Amaryllis belladonna

And Crossyne flava has burst through the gravel to come into flower in a matter of days

Crossyne flava Crossyne flava

I think that they think it's already autumn!

cheers

fermi


We have a number of Oxalis from South Africa which like our conditions (I wish the South American ones did as well!).

This is the Salmon Pink form of Oxalis hirta

Oxalis hirta "Salmon-Pink form"

This is the rather shy to flower Oxalis palmifrons doing well in an "in-ground trough" - which was a mistake as it is trying to escape and could become a weed!

Oxalis "trough" Oxalis palmifrons

cheers

fermi


Submitted by Fermi on Thu, 06/11/2015 - 18:45

These Nerine rosea were in bloom in April

Nerine rosea

Followed by a late flower on what I grew as N. filifolia but the foliage isn't right for that species (too wide)

Nerine NOT filifolia

Since then we've also had Nerine crispa (syn undulata) flowering in the Shadehouse

Nerine crispa

And a winter flowering species in now in bloom but I keep forgetting to get a pic (before the frosts destroy them!)

cheers

fermi


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 06/12/2015 - 08:41

Wonderful!


Submitted by Toole on Fri, 06/12/2015 - 15:22

Yes wonderful, Fermi --no blooms on any of my Nerines this season --found some long lost clumps well buried by heavy leafmold and shaded by shrubs blush ..all sorted now.yes


Submitted by Fermi on Tue, 07/07/2015 - 21:03

In reply to by Lori S.

A winter-flowering hesperantha, Hesperantha humilis,

Hesperantha humilis

cheers

fermi


The ornamental romulea species are now in bloom.We grow most of them in pots.

Romulea in pots

Romulea sabulosa needs a good amount of water when in growth, so is kept in a tray of water when it comes into leaf,

Romulea sabulosa

Romulea tetragona has distinctive foliage and bright flowers

Romulea tetragona

Romulea hirta has primrose flowers with dark markings towards the center,

Romulea hirtaRomulea hirta

cheers

fermi


Moraea macronyx is beautifully scented but the flowers are fleeting,

Moraea macronyxMoraea macronyx

Lapeirousia oreogena might be small but it is absolutely stunning! A flowering size corm produces a whorl of leafy bracts from which each flower emerges,

Lapeirousia oreogenaLapeirousia oreogenaLapeirousia oreogena

This Babiana odorata is from seed and may've been hybridized with B.pygmaea,

Babiana odorata seedlingBabiana odorata seedling

cheers

fermi


Hi Claire,

yes, we are lucky to live in a zone where such bulbous plants thrive (some a little too well!) and we don't have to do much for them.

This Moraea bipartita came from seed from the NZAGS Seedex a few years ago,

Moraea bipartita

cheers

fermi


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 08/24/2015 - 19:23

In reply to by Fermi

I have to say, too, that these last few posts of yours, Fermi, are particularly spectacular!


[quote=RickR]

I have to say, too, that these last few posts of yours, Fermi, are particularly spectacular!

[/quote]

Thanks,Rick,

I'm only showing you the good ones!cheeky

Here are a few more:

My fave babiana, Babiana pygmaea

Babiana pygmaeaBabiana pygmaea

Lachenalia bolusii

Lachenalia bolusiiLachenalia bolusii close-up

Gladiolus abbreviatus

Gladiolus abbreviatus

cheers

fermi


At the Kyneton Horticultural Society Spring Flower Show last weekend I saw a nice potful of Lachenalia aloides, better than I can grow here!

cheers

fermi


Lachenalia orchioides var glaucina is an old favorite, received from some venerable gardeners in our club who have since passed away

Lachenalia orchioides var glaucina

Lachenalia contaminata in the rock garden

Lachenalia contaminataLachenalia contaminata

Moraea aristata in a sand bed with Crossyne flava

Moraea aristata

cheers

fermi


[quote=Lori S.]

Wow!  What exotic beauties!!

[/quote]

There's more to come, Lori!

This is a species of "orchid gladdie", Gladiolus virescens

Gladiolus virescensGladiolus virescens

Also quite exotic looking is Babiana ringens which has evolved a perch for the birds which pollinate it!

Babiana ringensBabiana ringens

cheers

fermi


This gladdie is certainly wonderful and extraordinary, Lori. I got it recently from Greg Boldiston, Longinomus Plants, Romsey.

It's Gladiolus lilaceus and during the day its a dull reddish color and unscented,

Gladiolus.liliaceus.daytimeGladiolus.liliaceus.daytimeGladiolus.liliaceus.daytime

But at night it changes to a lilac-purple and is strongly scented!

Gladiolus.liliaceus@night-timeGladiolus.liliaceus@night-timeGladiolus.liliaceus@night-time

cheers

fermi


Hi, Fermi,

Does it go back to the reddish color in the morning?  That is too weird (but beautiful)!

...Claire


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 10/12/2015 - 14:18

That was my question, too.

 

(I think) I have only seen pics of G. virescens with flowers on long stalks, normal for glads.  Is there anything special with these short ones?

Very spectacular flowers and flowering on all of these.  And your photography skills are not going unnoticed!


[quote=Fermi]

...It's Gladiolus lilaceus and during the day its a dull reddish color and unscented,

Gladiolus.liliaceus.daytimeGladiolus.liliaceus.daytimeGladiolus.liliaceus.daytime

But at night it changes to a lilac-purple and is strongly scented!

Gladiolus.liliaceus@night-timeGladiolus.liliaceus@night-timeGladiolus.liliaceus@night-time

 

[/quote]

Amazing!


Sorry for not replying earlier - we were away for 2 weeks and I only had the tablet to use which doesn't play well with the NARGS Forum! That's why my reply above isn't signed off!

We got back to a wonderful show of ixias in full bloom.

These are seedlings of "Teal" which is derived from Ixia viridiflora with some seedlings appearing similar to the original species,

Ixia "Teal" and seedlingsIxia "Teal" and seedlingsIxia "Teal" seedlings - pale blue with purple centerIxia "Teal" seedlings - pink with purple centerIxia "Teal" seedling - white with small olive centerIxia "Teal" seedling - blue-purpleIxia "Teal" seedling - blue-purple

cheers

fermi


[quote=RickR]

(I think) I have only seen pics of G. virescens with flowers on long stalks, normal for glads.  Is there anything special with these short ones?

[/quote]

Hi Rick,

I've only grown this one from seed and only in a pot, so maybe it would get taller in the open ground,

cheers

fermi


Submitted by Fermi on Sun, 11/08/2015 - 06:19

In reply to by Fermi

Moraea polyanthos grown from NZAGS Seedex 2011, sown July 2012; first flowering this season

Moraea polyanthos

cheers

fermi


Submitted by Fermi on Sat, 11/14/2015 - 22:20

In reply to by Lori S.

Thanks, Lori,

so many of the South African bulbs are great for our gardens, but some need to be kept in pots or troughs because they are so tiny, others need to be contained to avoid them going feral!

This is Ixia rouxii, a species with black centers which can be stunning when in full flower but quickly become untidy when they start to fade,

Ixia rouxiiIxia rouxii

cheers

fermi


Submitted by Fermi on Fri, 11/20/2015 - 03:35

In reply to by Fermi

A new one from a friend who runs Longinomus Plants in Romsey, Victoria:

Ixia polystachya

Ixia polystachyaIxia polystachya

cheers

fermi