Rhododendron 2013

Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 05/25/2013 - 15:00

Although the winter was tough it seems that most rhododendrons survived although the leaves are somewhat burnt.

Here are some flowering now:

A cross I got as a small seedling, I don't know the parency though.

 

Another cross I got as a small seedling. The leaves are huge and although the trusses seems small they are not! The plant is 3-4m tall now and still fast growing.

 

Rh thomsonii - about 4m tall. I can barely see the flowers.

Comments


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 05/25/2013 - 15:09

A repens hybrid, I don't know which one and another I should know, but . . .

 

Rh roxieanum soon finished, Rh pachysanthum, Rh 'Jacksonii'

   


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 06/01/2013 - 14:22

Some more flowering now both down in the woodland and by the doors. Tree Creeper grows in th moss on a big rock.


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 06/01/2013 - 14:33

The last lot . . . .for now.
Some are unnamed seedlings and some have lost their names (that is I have lost them).
Rh orbiculare is the last branch of a huge shrub that suddenly died. Rh bureavii is a winner both in flower and without. The leaves are covered by a thick brown decorative indumentum on the underside.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 06/02/2013 - 10:54

Absolutely wonderful plants, Trond!

By contrast, here is our one and only...
Rhododendron mucronulatum 'Crater's Edge':
 


Submitted by David L on Thu, 06/06/2013 - 03:56

A lovely collection of Rhododendrons, Trond  Am looking forward to spring here but I notice I already have Narcissus cantabricus flowering. Did I notice a couple of Cordylines in pots on either side of your porch? They do travel.


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 06/08/2013 - 12:31

David wrote:

A lovely collection of Rhododendrons, Trond  Am looking forward to spring here but I notice I already have Narcissus cantabricus flowering. Did I notice a couple of Cordylines in pots on either side of your porch? They do travel.

Thanks David ;D  I am always looking forward to spring - even now when we have the best time of the year with a whole summer awaiting ;)
Yes, I have two Cordylines and an Astelia (chathamica) in pots at the front door. Can't be sure of the winter frosts. I lost two big plants the other year when I was too late to bring them inside.

Lori, it is a start ;)


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 06/08/2013 - 14:16

Just a couple today, don't wont to tire you.

The first one is bred by an American Rh Lem's Monarch. The second is a species, Rh decorum which has a very pleasant scent. The third is also a species, Rh yakushimanum.

     


Trond, a gorgeous selection of Rhodies there, simply marvelous.  One of my first garden loves was Rhododendron, although our climate here, and in particular the specific garden when I am now and in the past, are not overly conducive to Rhodies (often too hot and dry, in the winter too exposed and wind-burned).  But I do love them.

Lori, I remember during my days of active involvement with the American Rhododendron Society, the exciting news of dwarf high mountain forms of R. mucronulatum that are genetically stable and stay dwarf in the garden, a treat to see 'Crater's Edge'.


Thank you very much Mark! I have however just showed a fraction of them so you shouldn't tire too much ;-)

Here are a N American species, not showy but I like it.

Rhododendron albiflorum.


You need to show us the rest then, Trond!  They are spectacular!

Your Rhododendron albiflorum looks quite different from the way we see them in the mountains here:

         


[quote=Lori S.]

You need to show us the rest then, Trond!  They are spectacular!

Your Rhododendron albiflorum looks quite different from the way we see them in the mountains here:

         

[/quote]

 

 

Yes, they're very different from your plants. Could be the climate or maybe the provenience. My sole plant is a bit suppressed too by its neighbors.