What do you see on your garden walks?

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Okay, persisting with this... won't you join us and post some photos of your gardens too?

1) Even protected under a good-sized Pinus sylvestris 'Watereri', it appears the hail managed to whack a few leaves of this silver-leaved Cyclamen purpurascens2) A gorgeous and under-appreciated native, Dalea purpurea - it is perfectly well-behaved in the garden, and reaches glorious proportions, even in the poor, dry soil out along our fence... as compared to the very modest little plants (2-3 stems) I see in the wild, oddly enough.3) Onosma stellulata4) Telekia speciosa... it's giant leaves are, unfortunately, quite vulnerable to hail damage!5) Perhaps not the neatest dianthus in form or flower, but the fragrance is intoxicating and most unusual, a sweet perfume rather than the usual clove-spice... Dianthus monspessulanus 6) Verbascum nigrum... this genus is worth all it weeding it causes me.  :)7) Another Campanula thyrsoides, showing the very hairy flowers and the randomness of bloom along the stem -flowering sometimes starts in the middle, then ends up at the top and base or is all over the stalk at once, odd!8 ) Not much happening in the troughs, but for Campanula hercegovina, starting to bloom...9) And this little dianthus.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori, a nice assortment!  Looking at your much larger plant of a silver-leaved Cyclamen purpurescens will inspire my as-of-yet single leaf young plant of an all-silver C. purpurescens that showed up recently.  And Dalea purpurea, WOW, that's now a *must have* plant on my list, that one really speaks to me.  I think you might have skipped over Verbascum nigrum, I don't see it... I'm anxious to see it.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Ooops, I did forget my favourite verbascum!!  Here it is:Verbascum nigrum, presumably named for the sometimes-darkish stems?

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Holy moly, Lori!  And I was very happy with my Verbascum nigrum, until I see yours.

Here is my Verbascum nigrum wimp.  It's the second flush of flowers, even though I let all the first flush flowers go to seed.  (I'm not sure they produced seed, though.)  I cut the old stalks down just so I could take this pic.  On the left is Allium stellatum from Kandiyohi County, MN, and center is Ruellia humilis.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

My goodness, Lori.... your Campanula hercegovina is a real beauty  8)

I don't know Dalea purpurea and my search via the RHS plantfinder lists only a couple pf mailorder suppliers in the UK, one of whom hasn't actually got it listed!

Do you get a good seed set on yours ( she asked, plaintively and full of hope.......... ;)  )M

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret) Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Maggi, Dalea purpurea is a favourite of bees, and produces seeds generously, and I have several of them - enough to supply every seedex that exists!!  :o  Just PM me with your address and I'll send you seeds later on when they are ready.  Mark, it is certainly a drought-resistant plant, adapted to the dry plains, with a deep taproot - one that would likely take your current drought and watering ban in stride.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Actually, Rick, perhaps I shouldn't say this but the particular V. nigrum I showed is a bit undersized, in comparison to big, mature plants out back where the conditions are a bit kinder!  ;D  They are long-lived perennials here; there too?  In our short season, they have a long bloom, but I've never thought of coaxing two sets of flowers stems out of them... not sure they'd actually manage it here... ?  (Come to think of it, I think I have a test case... some young miscreant broke the flower stems off a young plant out front.  I'll keep an eye on it and see if it is inclined to replace those stems or not.  :) ) Is the Ruellia a native plant there?  I assume it's perennial there, as well?  Very intriguing...I'm enjoying your photos a lot and hope to see more of your beautiful garden!  So glad you got the digital camera a while back!

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

1) A sweet little thing, though apparently an annual (dang!) - Omphalodes kuzinskyanae , from the SRGC seedex2) Campanula dolomitica, purchased this spring.  It will likely get too big (and spreading) for the little tufa garden, but for now, it adds some interest.3) Not one to stop traffic, exactly - Silene pusilla, from seed this year4) Looking forward to seeing the flowers on this one  - Onobrychis argyrea - based on my admiration of the beautiful flowers of the foothills forage-crop plant/weed, sainfoin (Onobrychis vicifolia).  The seeds are from Pavelka: "1500m, Urgup, Turkey; tufted perennial, silver hairy leaves, erect-ascending scapes 15-25cm, 3-8 yellow flowers, dry sunny hills."5) Campanula x carpatica, helping to soften... a little... a trough full of cacti and dasiphora.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Wonderful photos, Lori.  I hope you will post a photo of the Onobrychis when it blooms.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

So, it's almost mid-August.  What's happening in your gardens?

1) Senecio polyodon, from seed this spring.  (I suspect it is ssp. polyodon, though the seeds from trade didn't specify that.)  I had this for many years some time ago (until it was swamped by other plants) and was never quite certain if it overwintered, or merely seeded... I always suspected it actually overwintered.  2) Lilium martagon 3) Dracocephalum grandiflorum with Scutellaria alpina4) Aconitum lycoctonum 5) Carlina acaulis looks most interesting to me at this stage, before the flowers open.6) Campanula 'Elizabeth Oliver'7) Lallemantia canescens - only wimpy little plants this year8 ) Echinops tschimganicus - is this a valid name?  9) Another Cyclamen purpurascens10) And finally one from the rock garden, though hardly a spectacular thing... Didymophysa vesicaria - Correction: probably Braya linearis; seeds from Holubec (description: "China: Beima Shan, Yunnan, 4800m, limestone scree, small caespitose plant, 8cm high, white to pink flowers in terminal inflorescence, rounded inflated siliques, 15mm wide; 2008 seed.")

Which leads me to a question for all you enthusiasts out there...

What alpines would one grow for late summer/fall colour and bloom?

Edit:  Oops, here's that elusive cyclamen now!

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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