What do you see on your garden walks?

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The Cyclamen has chosen to hide itself, Lori! But you have an immense number of plants flowering all the time. Here some plants grow to immense dimensions instead. They swamp the smaller ones.

Here are some examples:1) Impatiens glandulifera grows to 3.5-4m. I remove hundreds every spring but they sprout from "millions" of seeds in the moist climate here. I started with 3 plants. I regret that very much!2) In the Impatiens forest when I look to the sky.Next postI. glandulifera is annual, this one (not sure of the name) is perennial. Not more than 2" but spreading steadily outwards and swamping smaller neighbours. 3) Aralia something makes 2m canes every year down in my bog.4) Lysimachia nummularia looks modest but cover all neighbours in short time. It can also grow into smaller shrubs. I use it as groundcover under rhododendrons and other shrubs but it has also occupied parts of the lawn and many beds.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Hoy wrote:

But you have an immense number of plants flowering all the time.

The reality is that it is simply a very short, compressed season here - if plants are going to bloom, they only have a short time in which to do it!

Wow, your I. glandulifera "forest" is amazing!  :o

Hoy wrote:

3) I. glandulifera is annual, this one (not sure of the name) is perennial. Not more than 2" but spreading steadily outwards and swamping smaller neighbours.

Similar to my invisible cyclamen, I think this photo of yours chose not to show itself!  Would love to see it though.

Oh, by the way, after a little googling, it seems Echinops tschimganicus is a valid name, so it appears... so that leads me to the next question: Is what I have, it?

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I must have been asleep while working with those pictures (that means I am often sleeping, not the first time this).Not the showiest of plants, but here you are: Impatiens unknown species.

PS. The Cyclamen is very nice, mine haven't started to grow yet. But I have mostly hederifolium and coum.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hmm, interesting perennial impatiens... wonder what the species is? 

1) Verbascum eriophorum, a biennial here.  (I added "here" because some verbascums that act as biennials elsewhere seem to be perennial in colder zones... go figure.)2) Campanula x tymsonii3) Flowers now open on Onobrychis argyrea - solid yellow.  (I had rather hoped for some interesting striping or detail on the petals.)

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lori, I also grow Lallemantia canescens.  It looks so terrible now, as many of my alpines.  This year has been a most trying year for them: a drought in early and mid spring, and rain rain rain all summer!  Yesterday six thunderstorms rolled through in just one day! (temps were lowered to 85F day-70F night)  And humidity hadn't dropped below 70% for a week plus.

Iris suaveolens seems relatively fine in the ground, but in pots the foliage is nearly gone, although I do find that the rhizomes are still in tact.  Same with I. reichenbachii. 

I have never had such an infestation of earwigs.  This is my first flower of Dianthus callizonus from seed sown late this spring. And Gentiana tibeticus.  Already the insect has found them.  The Vernonia sp. only grew 8ft this season.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
RickR wrote:

I have never had such an infestation of earwigs.  The Vernonia sp. only grew 8ft this season.

Rick, earwigs love the hot, humid conditions that multiple thunderstorms create ;D  Your Vernonia only 8'?  How tall does it grow regularly?  Mine is just coming into bloom (Vernonia novaboracensis), looking like your plant, and it is at 8' right now, but has not grown taller in the past.

Lots of interesting plants shown in this thread, I'm behind in participating and commenting.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Normally 9-10 feet.  I don't have a clue which species it is.  Is there a way to differentiate Vernonia spp.?  It came from the garden of a man in our rockgerden society.  He doesn't know its identity either,and doesn't remember where he got it.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Terrific Vernonias!  Whew, 10' tall... !?!  As you know, Rick, I have a soft spot for great, hulking plants (as well as for more alpine-ishly proportioned ones... and the ones in between  :D), so I must give those statuesque beauties a try!

Our season has been rainier and cooler than usual as well - seems like odd weather patterns all over this year.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's a key to Vernonia spp., that may be helpful:http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=134497

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori, you posted the same link I was going to post, literally a few seconds before me :D  Might Rick's plant be V. gigantea?http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=242417438

By the way, anyone interested in good "Ironweeds", Vernonia lettermanii is a much smaller fine-leaved plant, with beautiful narrow leaves like Amsonia hubrectii.  I don't currently have it, but it is on my watch list.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

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