What do you see on your garden walks?

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

1) This little Oxytropis megalantha has a bit of rebloom. 2) I'm very pleased with Asyneuma limonifolium - this plant and others have been in bloom since the beginning of July.3) Osteospermum barberiae var compactum never blooms extravagantly for me - I'm sure it would prefer a hotter, drier spot - but I'm impressed that it has been perennial for 8-9 years now here in zone 3!

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Not too much happening in the garden because of extreme drought this summer.  We had some rain last weekend (actually quite a bit of rain) and some things are already trying to green up.  One thing that's been constant is Zinnia grandiflora.  Have to love this plant - it's a late starter and then blooms without stop until hard frost.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That does seem to be a feat with the Osteospermum, congratulations!

I've been impressed with the tenacity of Asyneuma limonifolium as well.  I had it for many years in a pot, until it blew off the patio during a storm, and all I could find was the empty pot!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Spiegel wrote:

Not too much happening in the garden because of extreme drought this summer.  We had some rain last weekend (actually quite a bit of rain) and some things are already trying to green up.  One thing that's been constant is Zinnia grandiflora.  Have to love this plant - it's a late starter and then blooms without stop until hard frost.

Spiegel, I have never seen this Zinnia before. Is the creeping habit normal or due to drought? I would like to have a close-up of the flower too, if possible!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

It's planted towards the bottom of a slope so gravity seems to have lent a hand.  Also, it is never watered except by nature.  Perhaps it would be more upright with water and better soil?  It's growing here in a very limey, lean scree.  It's found in Colorado and Kansas and southward.  It's been growing here at least seven years and it did take some time to establish.  Spring here is normally cold with lingering frosts so it isn't touched as far as trimming back before mid-May.  I'll try and post a close-up of the flower sometime this weekend.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks  Anne, I must try this one at my summerhouse!

Here are some other plants flowering now in my garden:

1&2) Fuchsia magellanica grows to a huge shrub during the summer and flower throughout the fall.

3&4) Phuopsis stylosa starts flowering in the summer  but produces a dense mat with new shoots flowering from August till the frost comes.

5&6) Tropaeolum ciliatum has not as flamboyant flowers as it sister T. speciosus but a modest habit climbing in the Rhododendrons.

7) Phygelia capensis is a faithful bloomer from July onwards.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26
Hoy wrote:

Spiegel wrote:

Not too much happening in the garden because of extreme drought this summer.  We had some rain last weekend (actually quite a bit of rain) and some things are already trying to green up.  One thing that's been constant is Zinnia grandiflora.  Have to love this plant - it's a late starter and then blooms without stop until hard frost.

Spiegel, I have never seen this Zinnia before. Is the creeping habit normal or due to drought? I would like to have a close-up of the flower too, if possible!

As promised, if a little late.  Close-up of Zinnia grandiflora flowers.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Spiegel wrote:

As promised, if a little late.  Close-up of Zinnia grandiflora flowers.

Thank you, Anne! Charming flowers not unlike Tagetes.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

The drought continues with temps back into the high 80sF but some cooler weather in sight for the end of the week.  No rain forcast for the week, though.  The garden is quiet but the one rain we did have inspired Phlox pungens to start reblooming and frshened up some other plants.  Just a few shots of plants in the crevice gardens.1.    Coronilla minima2.    Phlox pungens3.    Astragalus utahensis4-5. Eriogonum umbellatum humistratum6.    Eriogonum ovalifolium

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, to live in a place where fuchsias and Phygelia are hardy outdoors!   :o  I doggedly tried to grow Phuopsis stylosa for years and years, but it would never winter over for me.  However, there is a gentleman in town who always sells it at the plant sale, and it is hardy for him.  I'm baffled.

Love the Zinnia grandiflora, Anne!  I think it would likely be a good candidate for this area.  (I did grow a couple one year, but lost the seedlings in the welter of other foliage; must try again.)Wonderful foliage in your garden - the Coronilla and Astragalus are terrific.  How nice to have phlox blooming again!  I've never seen that here.  (Is our season too short?  Or does it happen in other people's gardens, but not mine?)

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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