What do you see on your garden walks?

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
McDonough wrote:

Lori, you posted the same link I was going to post, literally a few seconds before me :D 

Well, you know... great minds...  ;D

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I know I had tried to key the vernonia many, many years ago and gave up.  Maybe eflora was not up or that part finished, I dunno.  But why I hadn't thought about it recently, is a Homer moment (doh!)

So...

What the heck is up with eflora's glossary???  I look words up, there is a page for said word(s), but no definition...It's not my FF browser, I tried IE and seamonkey(yeah okay it's about the same as FF).  I get this: http://www.efloras.org/glossary.aspx?term_id=12970

Anyway, after learning new and reviewing old definitions, like scaberellous, scaberulose, phyllary, pappi, pannose, urceolate, involucre, obconic, subulate, cypselae, etc., keying was surprisingly easy!

Definitely Vernonia gigantea.  Everything fits.  I looked at the descriptions of all the other species listed, and nothing comes even close in size.  The two largest (fasciculata and flaccidifolia) have other traits besides size that don't match.

I just thought now, what if it isn't North American? Yow. An investigation for another time.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, just checked the eFlora glossary, man is that useless or what?  Instead I googled and used wikipedia to define "pappus":http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pappus_%28flower_structure%29

Now that you learned all those botanical terms specific to Asteraceae, you'll be a pro for further taxonomic sleuthing in Asteraceae. I don't know a couple of those terms either, I had better do some research.

Glad you arrived at an ID on your Vernonia... someone sent me seed of V. gigantea a few years back... I wonder what I did with the seed?

That's funny what you say: "what if it isn't American?".  Good point, there are only 17 described for Flora of North America, but according to a wikipedia link: "Vernonia is a genus of about 1000 species of forbs and shrubs in the family Asteraceae", also found in South America, Asia, and Africa, not to mention the abundant hybrids... you have you're work cut out for you!  You can probably assume however, that your plant is N. American.  Also, some members of the genus in other countries might be ascribed to other genera at this point?  A search on Vernonia species at www.ipni.org comes up with 38 screens of species!!!

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very nice Vernonia flowers - I must try some.

Plenty in bloom here, though little that is alpine-ish or of any great note, but here are some anyway:1, 2) First bloom on Cyananthus chungdianensis, from seed this year (Pavelka: "3600m, Haba Shan, Yunnan, China; dwarf cushions, small green lobed leaves, many blue flowers, ciliate inside; rocky slopes, meadows, very good.")3) Omphalodes kuzinskyanae deserves an update... it is really a charming little plant.4) Inula ensifolia5) Inula helenium6) A close-up of Dianthus knappii... which must surely be one of the least-interesting dianthus, notable only in that it is yellow!  But yet I grow it...  ::)7) Cute little mushroom in woolly thyme8 ) Penstemon pinifolius 'Mersea Yellow'9, 10) And, on the "to-do" list for tomorrow, cherry picking... 'Evans', a Prunus cerasus sour cherry cultivar is hardy and a good producer here.  The apples also need to be picked... there will soon be a lot of pie on the menu.  (Mmmm, the breakfast of champions!  ;D )

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Forgot to say that I'll certainly save you seed, Lori.  I grow Inula ensifolia 'Compacta'.  I grew one of the large species of inula from seed, but they were aphid magnets.  Amazing how they tolerated the bug, though.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks, Rick!

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

I can't say that late summer is a high point (nothing can match April, May and June in a rock garden!) but my garden continues to have lots of little gems blooming and the overall effect of the alpines is very soothing this time of year and verdant. Amazing how our gardens sustain us! I'm off to Kazakhstan for almost a month, leaving my garden with my wonderful girlfriend, Jan Fahs. It is comforting to hear rain early this morning and hope she gets periodic rains to help maintain this rather extensive collection while I'm gone (can you hear me being a tad nervous?)...

I bought a new camera for my trip, and these are some of the first shots I took yesterday AM: I will be thinking of you all during my travel, although I doubt I will have many chances at internet cafes, and when I do I'll have to spend the time checking in on work and family, so this really fun stuff will have to wait a month! Meanwhile, here's a few glimpses of my Quince Gardens on August 23: the images should be labeled!

1  Adiantum venustum2  Allium togashii3  Arum italicum 'Marmoratum'4  Bulbinella ex Drakensberg5  Daphne jasminea6  Escobaria albicolumnaria7  Hedeoma ciliolata8  Inula verbascifolia9  Pyrrhosia ex Mongolia10 rock garden in AM

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wonderful scenes, Panayoti!  Many exotic things there that I will have to look up.  Thanks for showing how great a well-planned alpine garden can look even, as you say, after most of the bloom has passed - just beautiful!

I'm sure we will all be looking forward to accounts of your trip with eagerness and downright envy!  :D Hope you have a great time!

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Very nice, Panayoti! You are lucky to have someone looking after your garden when away. When I come home my garden is completely overgrown. Remarkably how fast and big things grow when they get plenty of moisture.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Your garden is looking great Panayoti!

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

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