What do you see on your garden walks?

Submitted by Weiser on

Here is some of what I saw on a stroll today, after work.

Comments


Submitted by Kelaidis on Tue, 05/25/2010 - 13:04

Boy, John, your garden looks terrific right now: I'd sure love to visit again.

Although not really MY garden, I will post three pictures I took yesterday at Denver Botanic Gardens of Plantasia Steppe, the South African Plaza, and Dryland Mesa


Submitted by Weiser on Tue, 05/25/2010 - 15:14

PK
Thank you so much for your kind compliment.
It's been very cool to cold around here. With a little warmth it should explode, with color. I will keep an eye on it and post more shots later.


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 05/26/2010 - 15:06

OK I call you John?

Your garden is very nice! I would love to take a stroll in your garden and study plants on close encounter if possible. My garden is very untidy and quite different from yours. Here are some shots I took this afternoon.
The first is from my front door.

Apart from some 30 rhodos I have not many plants in flower for the moment - or rather they are dispersed all over my property.


Submitted by Weiser on Wed, 05/26/2010 - 15:26

Trond

So lush and green. That is one color we don't have enough of around here. Lots more of the Gray tones. Do I spy a couple of Yuccas by the steps in the first photo???  :-\  I must say your woodland with the Rhododendrons is very natural appearing and that woodland slope is assume!!


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 05/27/2010 - 01:15

Weiser wrote:

Trond

So lush and green. That is one color we don't have enough of around here. Lots more of the Gray tones. Do I spy a couple of Yuccas by the steps in the first photo???  :-\  I must say your woodland with the Rhododendrons is very natural appearing and that woodland slope is assume!!

Lush and green are the right words! Even my house become green due to green algae so I (or my wife really) wash it every second or third year! Moss grows everywhere and other plants like grasses germinate where they shouldn't.

But I have to disappoint you  - it is not Yuccas but Cordylines (C. australis 'purpurea'). They stand in pots because I have to move them indoors in the worst winter days. It is also two New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax) there. They are hardy here but stand in pots too.

My garden is steep and difficult to access with heavy tools so I have to carry what is needed. The vegetation is mostly natural but I put in plants I think fit there like the big Skunk Cabbages in the background.

I have a couple of Yuccas (Y. filamentosa) though but they don't flower for me. I haven't found the right site then for they flower in other gardens.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sat, 06/26/2010 - 09:15

June 26, 2010
Photographed in the garden this morning.
1. Daphne velenovskyi 'Balkan Rose'
2. Daphne sp (label indecipherable)
3. Daphne (planted in natural rock crevice and regularly pruned by deer)


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sat, 06/26/2010 - 09:26

And more .......

1. Zinnia grandiflora
2. Paederota bonarota setting seed
3. Onosma albo-rosea with left-over seedheads
4. Tufa cliff in Irish stone trough
5. Acantholimon sp finishing bloom
6. mystery grown from seed and not what the seed pack said!  I.D. please
sorry, 5 and 6 interchanged


Submitted by Kelaidis on Sat, 06/26/2010 - 09:59

Your mystery plant is Pterocephalus: I will let you check my three pix and choose the one you think. They are notoriously bad germinators from seed, incidentally...

I am very fond of these, and am very anxious to obtain their cousin, Pterocephalus spathulatus, from Spain where I trod upon it one October by the acre in the Sierra Cazorla. It has powerdery white leaves and stunning pink flowers for contrast...and NEEDS to be in my garden...

The first is P. depressus from Morocco (the easiest in my experience, blooming all summer)
P. parnassii (or P. perennis v. parnassii) from Greece and the last P. pinardii from Turkey.

The genus is much larger, including taller, coarse herbs from Eurasia that I have not hitherto succeeded in overwintering.


Submitted by penstemon on Mon, 06/28/2010 - 15:18

Pterocephalus spathulatus caught Dwight Ripley's eye too; "... heads of rose-colored flowers sit almost stemless on the wide, chalk-pale cushions .."
There's been an empty space in my garden for this plant, ever since I read that description.


Submitted by Weiser on Tue, 06/29/2010 - 11:37

Great garden shots all around!i

I am seeing a lot of Opuntia polyacatha blossoms scattered around the Garden this time of year. Here are a few, to wet your appetites.
Opuntia polyacantha var. polyacantha (North Dakota)
Opuntia polyacantha var. polyacantha (Idaho )
Opuntia polyacantha var. polyacantha
Opuntia polyacantha var. erinacea- syn. var. ursina (Mt. Charleston,NV)
Opuntia polyacantha var. hystrucina
Opuntia polyacantha var. polyacantha ("Crystal Tide")
Opuntia polyacantha aff. nicholii
Opuntia polyacantha var. polyacantha-syn. var. rhodantha (Idaho)
Opuntia polyacantha hybrid “Snowball”
Opuntia polyacantha hybrid Claude Barr selection


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Tue, 06/29/2010 - 13:43

Kelaidis wrote:

Your mystery plant is Pterocephalus: I will let you check my three pix and choose the one you think. They are notoriously bad germinators from seed, incidentally...

I am very fond of these, and am very anxious to obtain their cousin, Pterocephalus spathulatus, from Spain where I trod upon it one October by the acre in the Sierra Cazorla. It has powerdery white leaves and stunning pink flowers for contrast...and NEEDS to be in my garden...

The first is P. depressus from Morocco (the easiest in my experience, blooming all summer)
P. parnassii (or P. perennis v. parnassii) from Greece and the last P. pinardii from Turkey.

The genus is much larger, including taller, coarse herbs from Eurasia that I have not hitherto succeeded in overwintering.

I think it must be P. pinardii.  That seems to ring a bell.  It seems OK in the lime bed. Thanks


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Tue, 06/29/2010 - 13:45

Skulski wrote:

Incarvillea zhongdianensis is in bloom here now:

Lori, I'd kill (not really) to see that in my garden, what a gorgeous plant.


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 07/01/2010 - 22:58

Mark, I'll definitely post a photo of the allium when it's in bloom.  I bought it labelled as Allium senescens ssp. montanum var. glaucum - dang, have to correct those records again, but Allium nutans sure rolls off the tongue a lot more easily!  Thanks for the ID! 

Ann, I always collect seeds from the incarvillea for the seedex, so let me know if you would like to try it.  I must say, that particular plant is looking pretty good this year, but Todd Boland's incarvilleas, grown in his alpine beds, always look much better than mine!

Here's the first flower on Telesonix jamesii var. heucheriformis , bought this year from Beaver Creek and stuck in the new tufa bed... and what an interesting flower!


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 07/02/2010 - 00:38

I am jealous on those Opuntias!
Here the Incarvilleas have gone to seed and the Sedums rule. It is very dry here now at the south east coast of Norway where I have my summerhouse.


Submitted by Weiser on Fri, 07/02/2010 - 07:22

Hoy
I like the habitat shot. Have you ever tryed growing Opuntia fragilis or it's hydrids in that area? It grows in similar enviroments in Canada. I think it may do well for you planted in the shallow soils that thread through the rock outcroppings. Two others that would be worth a try are Opuntia macrorhiza and Opuntia humifusa.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 07/02/2010 - 08:43

Skulski wrote:

Mark, I'll definitely post a photo of the allium when it's in bloom.  I bought it labelled as Allium senescens ssp. montanum var. glaucum - dang, have to correct those records again, but Allium nutans sure rolls off the tongue a lot more easily!  Thanks for the ID!   

Ann, I always collect seeds from the incarvillea for the seedex, so let me know if you would like to try it.  I must say, that particular plant is looking pretty good this year, but Todd Boland's incarvilleas, grown in his alpine beds, always look much better than mine!

Here's the first flower on Telesonix jamesii var. heucheriformis , bought this year from Beaver Creek and stuck in the new tufa bed... and what an interesting flower!
Lori, thank you, I'd love to try some seed.


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 07/02/2010 - 10:29

Weiser wrote:

Hoy
I like the habitat shot. Have you ever tryed growing Opuntia fragilis or it's hydrids in that area? It grows in similar enviroments in Canada. I think it may do well for you planted in the shallow soils that thread through the rock outcroppings. Two others that would be worth a try are Opuntia macrorhiza and Opuntia humifusa.

That's an idea! I think I will try. I have never tried cacti here. Maybe the deer don't eat them either although they seemingly prefere plants with thorns like my roses.
I'll look out for seed.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 07/02/2010 - 14:22

Lori, wonderful pictures.  Your asyneuma seems much tighter than mine. Do you grow it in full sun? Mine has a little shade, maybe that's a problem? The carduncellus is marvelous and has just made it on my want and need list.  Have you had it long? What can you tell me about it?


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 07/02/2010 - 14:43

Thanks, Anne!  The asyneuma is in full sun; the tallest stems are 5-6" (although there are also a couple of little cuties in the same bed with blooming stems only 1.5" tall!)  Having only grown it this short time, I don't know anything more about it, other than that it does seem to like lime, as I had read.  
The carduncellus is a bit of a conundrum... I've had it for many years, and have sent seed to the seedex for a long time, but unbeknownst to me, apparently it is very difficult to start from seed or possibly even self-sterile... ???  (Upon hearing this, I did give it a try last summer and got no germination at all from fresh seed after a couple of months (moist paper towel/baggie method).  A very experienced grower over at SRGC has, reportedly, tried seed at all different stages with no germination, and hence, suggested that it may be self-sterile.)  It does propagate itself by producing the odd offset a few inches away, not at all rambunctiously.  Other than the apparent germination problem, it's very carefree in these conditions.

Edit:  Hmm, as I do have 2 different plants/little colonies, bought from different sources, I should try cross-pollinating them...


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 07/03/2010 - 22:38

Fabulous gardens, all!  How I wish they were in my neighborhood, so that I could walk by and admire them!  

Here are some recent pix, some alpine-ish, some not at all.
A couple from seed last year...
1) Oxytropis megalantha
2) Penstemon virens

Others:
3) Saxifraga paniculata var. minutifolia 'Red-backed Spider' - I know I showed this one before, but my saxes out front got eaten by rabbits, so I'm asking for indulgence!   ::)
4) Saxifraga 'Mrs. Winifred Bevington' - some bird took a liking (or a dislike?) to it this spring and pulled chunks out of the rosette, so there are not so many flower stalks as in previous years, unfortunately.
5, 6) Dracocephalum botryoides
7) Scutellaria orientalis ssp. alpina
8 ) Mimulus guttatus, along the greenhouse edge, where they enjoy the runoff from watering/messing-around-with-the-ponds inside.
9) Oriental poppy 'Dwarf Allegro'.  (Actually, there's never been anything particularly dwarfish about them.)
10) Salix x boydii... Hmm, the ant activity on a couple of those stem tips suggests that I need to go out tomorrow and squash some aphids...


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 07/05/2010 - 22:30

What a terrific place you have there, Trond!  Pardon my ignorance, but does your fjord connect to the sea (salt water, or at least brackish?), or is it blocked off (hence, fresh water)... ? 

1) One bloom each on Erigeron aureus, from seed this spring - a pleasant surprise. 
2, 3) The start of bloom on Penstemon speciosus var. kennedyi


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 07/05/2010 - 23:19

Skulski wrote:

What a terrific place you have there, Trond!  Pardon my ignorance, but does your fjord connect to the sea (salt water, or at least brackish?), or is it blocked off (hence, fresh water)... ?  

Thanks, Lori! We all love to be here. (Now my two daughters are travelling on their own - the eldest is in fact visiting LA these days!)
Yes, this fjord connects with the ocean. It's about 10min with my boat and I'll see the open sea (Skagerrak). A lot of small islands and skerries are sheltering us from the oceanic waves.

Are the Erigeron aureus planted out in your new mountain? If so it isn't strange they flower first year in such a pristine environment!
I am sorry i have never succeeded with Scutellaria orientalis from seed.


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 07/08/2010 - 15:19

1, 2) Inula rhizocephala - while the plant in the tufa bed looks clean and pristine, these out along the sidewalk collect all manner of fine sand, spent salvia petals, pulsatilla seeds - you name it - on their fuzzy leaves.  I actually worked on them for a while with a brush before taking the photo... yeah, the neighbors already know I'm odd.   ;D

3, 4) Saponaria suendermannii... I suspect this is a hybrid, as it doesn't seem to produce seed?

5) Phlox hendersonii - the bloom has sparse at any one time, but very extended this year.

6) A new prize, Caragana jubata.  (A gift from a gardening friend at work!  :) )


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 07/09/2010 - 16:49

Yes, Trond, the Erigeron aureus are in the tufa bed, where I'm sure they will be happy, judging from their natural habitat here.

1) I lost my old Salvia juriscii this year, so was pleased to remember this little one along the sidewalk.  What bizarre and interesting flowers!

2) Erigeron pumilus var. condensata

3) Hieracium villosum

4) Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina - this little thing is a bit of a wanderer, but is so tiny, that I hope it will not seem a problem. 

5, 6) Silene saxifraga - I like this one a lot - pristine little flowers and a long bloom.


Submitted by Mark McD on Fri, 07/09/2010 - 17:15

Skulski wrote:

4) Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina - this little thing is a bit of a wanderer, but is so tiny, that I hope it will not seem a problem.   

Lori, maybe Bob Nold will chime in on Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina.  He sent it to me many years ago, along with another small blue one, S. angustifolia, with "you've been warned" warnings about how invasive they can be.  Initially I grew mine in pots in a bark mulch "plunge" area, and they of course escaped their confinement in short order.  Eventually, S. nana v. sapphirina died out, but I still have S. angustifolia mildly romping about in the decomposing bark mulch layer over hard rocky clay soil.  I found a couple pics of S. angustifolia from June 2001.


Submitted by Mark McD on Fri, 07/09/2010 - 17:31

So, I was checking into Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina, and couldn't find it initially... what's going on I ask?  Seems that S. nana and S. sapphirina are now two separate species, but initially using the USDA pages and typical sites I use to find this info, wasn't coming up with much, but I did finally find the following:

USDA classification for Scutellaria
http://plants.usda.gov/java/ClassificationServlet?source=display&classid...

This USDA classification cites S. nana var. sapphirina as a synonym of S. sapphirina... aha, found it
http://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch?keywordquery=Aria&mode=sciname

USDA page on S. sapphirina
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SCSA6

USDA page on S. nana:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SCNA

CalPhotos page on Scutellaria nana (note: some great looking dwarf cream to pinksih-yellow dwarfs)
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=photos_index&where...


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 07/09/2010 - 18:28

Ahhh, thanks for the warning!  I think I'll exile it to the hellish conditions of the front yard, where it can fight it out with fireweed, invasive native asters, and the remnants of Euphorbia cyparissias.


Submitted by Weiser on Fri, 07/09/2010 - 20:57

S. nana and S. sapphirina are both occur in Nevada.  S. sapphirina at high elevation in the southern mountans. S. nana is found locally in northern Nevada.
I have been thinking about hunting down S. nana, just haven't taken the time.
I think I have a leg-up though!  Gary Monroe the Photographer of S. nana on the USDA link is a very good friend, and Warm Springs Valley is only fifteen miles away. 


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 07/10/2010 - 17:17

A rainy day here, after a hot one yesterday (28 deg C).

Nice to see the membership slowly rising.  Come on, folks - we'd all love to see photo-tours of your gardens!  :)

Not a very alpine-ish selection today:
1) Helianthemum nummularium 'Ben Nevis'
2) One of the many self-sown Verbascum phoeniceum... I used to refer to the colour of this plant, somewhat disparagingly, as "puce" but it's grown on me over the years.   ;)
3) Silene zawadskii with a groundcover of Linnaea borealis, which also drapes down the side of the raised acid bed (4)
5) Last of the bloom for the Dodecatheon
6) Astrantia
7) Interesting seedpod on Papaver lapponicum
8 ) Talinum sediforme
9) Codonopsis clematidaea
10) Helianthemum oelandicum ssp. alpestre


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 07/11/2010 - 03:08

I have no objections to rampant plants! At least not if I can grow them here at my summerhouse. No formal beds, just seminatural plantings - that is native and foreign plants put down where they are supposed to thrive and spread! They have to cope with summer dryness and deer and trampling of sheep and people. I gladly receive rampant plants!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 07/11/2010 - 03:19

Skulski wrote:

1, 2) Inula rhizocephala - while the plant in the tufa bed looks clean and pristine, these out along the sidewalk collect all manner of fine sand, spent salvia petals, pulsatilla seeds - you name it - on their fuzzy leaves.  I actually worked on them for a while with a brush before taking the photo... yeah, the neighbors already know I'm odd.   ;D

3, 4) Saponaria suendermannii... I suspect this is a hybrid, as it doesn't seem to produce seed?

5) Phlox hendersonii - the bloom has sparse at any one time, but very extended this year.

6) A new prize, Caragana jubata.  (A gift from a gardening friend at work!  :) )

Lori, what a friend to have! Caragana jubata is a marvelous plant that I'm hoping to try. Yours looks really good. Ditto the Inula rhizocephala. I grew that once from seed and loved it. May garden at the moment is the Dolomites, have been taking many pictures but can't look at them on the computer since I left the camera connector at home. The other day I almost sat on Androsace hausmannii by mistake. The season is early and the plants have been fabulous!


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 07/11/2010 - 17:14

Well, where I am usually reluctant to ask for things, he tends to be quite bold, so he got me this fabulous plant from another grower!  :D
We look forward to your photos, Anne!


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 07/11/2010 - 23:07

1) A rather odd dianthus, Dianthus calocephalus, which has rather stiff grassy foliage and tall flowering stems with widely-spaced narrow leaves.  It's native to Iran, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan.  From the NARGS seedex.  
http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?13823

2) Edelweiss, Leontopodium alpinum

3) Athamanta turbith ssp. haynaldii - a long-blooming perennial here.
http://luirig.altervista.org/schedeit/ae/athamanta_turbith.htm

4) Another variation on the puce Verbascum phoeniceum (or hybrid thereof, as these are likely offspring of 'Helen Johnson', bought years ago, which I just read is said to be V. phoeniceum x bombyciferum?), this one approaching a pale yellow.  

5) Penstemon lyallii

6) Sideritis glacialis


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 07/12/2010 - 14:54

Inspired by Lori's biking route!

Not my garden but a nice place to walk and see!

We have to take the boat 15 min to get there. This island is about 10km long and narrow consisting of glacial sediments from the last ice age.
On the sheltered inside the shore consists of fine quartz sand. The interior is mostly covered by deciduous trees and farms.
Cars are forbidden.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 07/12/2010 - 14:58

Very beautiful, Trond!  I love the stone wall and the rustic fence!  Lovely meadow and sea view in the first shot.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 07/12/2010 - 15:09

Nice sandstone outcrop - love the patterns of bedding and fracturing, and the lichen!  What sorts of deciduous trees do you see there?


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 07/12/2010 - 15:15

Skulski wrote:

Nice sandstone outcrop - love the patterns of bedding and fracturing, and the lichen!  What sorts of deciduous trees do you see there?

The commonest trees are oaks, hazel, grey and black alder (Norw. names), crabapple, maple, elm, ash, rowan, whitebeam and maybe more. Lots of shrubbery (barberry, sloe and more).


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 07/12/2010 - 15:48

Once again, I'm reminded of how easy it would be, in relative terms, to have a comprehensive knowledge of the native tree species here... which are so very few, by comparison!


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 07/13/2010 - 00:47

Skulski wrote:

Once again, I'm reminded of how easy it would be, in relative terms, to have a comprehensive knowledge of the native tree species here... which are so very few, by comparison!

I almost forgot birch, gean and aspen! This is a species-rich area however. It is not like that everywhere in Norway. On the contrary, birch is the commonest deciduous tree.
Two more pictures..


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 07/13/2010 - 01:19

Some of the area is heavily grazed by cattle. This is to keep down the undergrowth in the woods and keep the meadows open. They have too many animals so the meadows are very short-cut, and almost no flowers. Some areas are fenced off to keep the animals out.
These are common:

Geranium sanguineum and Galium verum.
Especially Lady's bedstraw, you can smell it far out in the sea.

Excuse the diffuse pictures. The camera lens was covered by salt (and so was my spectacles so I didn't notice!)


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 07/13/2010 - 09:03

Very pretty!  Do I see Campanula rotundifolia in there too?  I had to look up "gean" -wild cherry?  (Not a familiar term for me - nice to learn things!)


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 07/13/2010 - 09:57

Skulski wrote:

Very pretty!  Do I see Campanula rotundifolia in there too?  I had to look up "gean" -wild cherry?  (Not a familiar term for me - nice to learn things!)

Yes, you do; and yes, that's right! (The Norwegian name is fuglebær - "bird-berry".)

Here are the harebell, and a spruce to show that they also creep in the lowlands!

The island's name is Jomfruland = Virgin land.


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 07/14/2010 - 23:25

I'm not sure of the white flower above - is it Daucus carota?

Just spent the evening "controlling" the virtual plague of self-seeded delphiniums out front, and moving other plants in front of them to hide their tatty, yellow lowermost leaves... mission accomplished, for a while, I hope.  There was a casualty though... I broke the top off an Eremurus... grrr!
A few things from the yard, some alpine-ish...
1) Phyteuma nigrum, done flowering now.
2) Stachys discolor
3) A stem of Lilium martagon 'Album', with Lupinus argenteus in the background
4) Allium obliquum
5) Scutellaria baicalensis, from seed last year... very interesting flowers and buds
6) Phyteuma scheuchzeri
7, 8 ) A long-time favourite plant, Linum flavum 'Compactum'
9, 10) An extremely hardy (at least zone 2) and elegant plant from the Caucasus, Echium russicum


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 07/15/2010 - 00:34

The white flowers are a carrot lookalike: Pimpinella saxifraga (and the blue grass is Leymus arenarius).

Nice clump of Phyteuma nigra! I sowed this species many years ago and it lowered this spring for the first time!

I have other Phyteuma but never seen discolor, seems to be a fine plant.
My Lilium martagon have all grown small and nonflowering!
It seems that the Onion Man is not the only one growing Allium! I am at the lookout for new species to try here - they have to be summer-flowering and able to cope with very dry periods.
Scutellaria baicalensis have I tried from seed several times but never had any success.
Another nice Phyteuma! We have one native Phyteuma in Norway, P. spicatum, but I have never seen it in the wild.
Longtime favored Linum you say, how long? My perennial Linums never live more than a couple of years! Have not tried this one, however.
Is Echium russicum perennial? Our local Echium, E. vulgare (a very pretty plant by the way) is biennial.


Submitted by Weiser on Thu, 07/15/2010 - 09:33

I grow two grasses in my dry-land garden that add light and movement to my plantings.

The first is my favorite, Indian Rice Grass - Achnatherum hymenoides (syn. Oryzopsis hymenoides, Stipa hymenoides) A moderately sized (6-12 inches) western bunch grass with airy, light refracting inflorescence.

The second is a taller (18-24inch) drought tolerant bunch grass. Mexican Feather Grass - Stipa tenuissima (syn. Nassella tenuissima). For soft flowing movement at the slightest breeze it is hard to beat.

I use these two grasses as companions for an assortment of western prairie natives.


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 07/15/2010 - 09:39

I like your grasses, Weiser!
Can't you open a new thread on grasses?
By the way, do you collect seed of any of your plants?


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 07/15/2010 - 19:17

Scutellaria baicalensis ... I wonder what I have that is supposed to be baicalensis?  It's scads different.  Mine bloomed in a pot rather than in ground, but still...


Submitted by Mark McD on Thu, 07/15/2010 - 20:29

RickR wrote:

Scutellaria baicalensis ... I wonder what I have that is supposed to be baicalensis?  It's scads different.  Mine bloomed in a pot rather than in ground, but still...

Rick, it does look scads different than Lori's plant... but will  the  real  Scutellaria  baicalensis  please  stand  up?  Googling, one finds scads of herbal sites, many of which seem to use any ol' Scutellaria plant photo... it doesn't matter in their drug/herbal world, so those should be largely ignored.  

The species is named for Lake Baikal, an area in Russian Siberia.  Googling, one learns about this fascinating area, Asia's largest lake, and the world's deepest lake.  This species is also found in China; Flora of China says "traditionally used as a febrifuge, for relieving fever... this is one of the most commonly collected species in China.".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Baikal

I gathered up a few photo links, not sure who's got what, but all these upright "scoots" are a hoot to grow, I like em.

Flora of China drawing and species description:
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=3315&flora_id=2
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200020285

More photo/info links:
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/po...

http://www.funet.fi/pub/sci/bio/life/plants/magnoliophyta/magnoliophytin...

http://www.rmrp.com/Images/Plants/S/Scuttelaria%20baicalensis%20100DPI.jpg


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 07/16/2010 - 00:02

RickR wrote:

Scutellaria baicalensis ... I wonder what I have that is supposed to be baicalensis?  It's scads different.  Mine bloomed in a pot rather than in ground, but still...

I don't know which plant is the real thing - yours or Lori's or both!
Yours seems to be a pretty plant anyway, Rick!


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 07/16/2010 - 09:22

Rick, the differences between our supposed Scutellaria baicalensis seems to be the flower arrangement on the stem - multiples, apparently, on yours and on the UBC photo plant; only orderly pairs on mine - and also that mine has a narrower lower lip.  No comment on the flower arrangement on the eFlora of China site though, unfortunately.  (Thanks for all the research, Mark!)  Mine seems to be the oddball.  I was sent seeds for it in a trade last year - interesting plant anyway, but strangely different from yours.  I think mine is something else again...

Trond, Linum flavum 'Compactum' is a long-lived perennial for me.  Echium russicum is completely perennial here too.

John, I wish those grasses were hardy here but no such luck!


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 07/17/2010 - 21:13

So, what's happening in your gardens in mid-July?

1, 2) Campanula thyrsoides... with a deadly surprise for a bumble bee
3) Erigeron peregrinus ssp. callianthemus
4) Papaver lapponicum blooming fitfullly
5) Convolvulus lineatus var. angustifolius, starting to bloom
6) Hemerocallis dumortieri
7) Geranium x 'Magnificum'
8 ) Anthemis marschalliana
9) A group of 5-year old Campanula barbata... pretty good mileage for a "biennial"!


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 07/20/2010 - 05:42

A nice bunch, Lori!

Campanula thyrsoides have I never succeeded with and Papaver lapponicum is a shortlived perennial in my garden. It grows naturally in the northernmost parts of Norway. Other similar papavers, P. radicatum and allies, also grow in the mountains here, many are endemic to Norway but I have never seen them either in the wild.

Campanula barbata is a native perennial in Norway. Although I have some here they are from seed and selfsow in the short grass.

We have moved from the sea to the mountains, or rather undulating plain (800-1200m) where we have a cabin. No formal beds here, just more or less natural flower meadows (we help by sowing fitting plants).

A piece of the meadow ordinary plants like Vicia cracca, Lothus corniculatus, Viscaria vulgaris, Antennaria dioica.
Campanula barbata in a natural setting.


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 07/23/2010 - 19:28

Lovely to see your plant selection, Trond!

Here's a few:
1 - 2) Cheiranthus roseus is a very pretty little thing!  I suspect it is likely also fragrant so I'll have to kneel down on that cheese-grater tufa to find out (ouch).
2) Delphinium brunonianum


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sat, 07/24/2010 - 06:11

Skulski wrote:

Lovely to see your plant selection, Trond!

Here's a few:
1 - 2) Cheiranthus roseus is a very pretty little thing!  I suspect it is likely also fragrant so I'll have to kneel down on that cheese-grater tufa to find out (ouch).
2) Delphinium brunonianum

Lori, that Cheiranthus roseus is a lovely little thing.  I'm attaching a photo (taken in my temporary garden of several weeks) of Androsace hausmannii, not too plentiful in the Dolomites.  Found it accidentally when I sat on a huge slab of limestone to take off a boot and it was all over that side of the rock.  Was so excited to see it that I photographed it bootless (ouch!).


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 07/24/2010 - 18:02

What a gorgeous little androsace!  I do hope you'll show us more pix of your trip, Anne.  :)

1) Jovibarba sp.
2) Iris sintenisii
3, 4) Police car moth (Gnophaela vermiculata)on Allium roseum
5) Gentiana gelida
6) Heterotheca jonesii
Now, getting pretty far from alpines... but these may provide cooling images to those of you in the extreme heat!
7) Nymphaea 'Marliaceae Albida'
8 ) Nymphaea 'Crystal', a tropical day-bloomer


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 07/26/2010 - 00:26

I like that spidery Iris, Lori. You too do grow houseleeks?
Why the name "police car moth", does the color resemble that of a police car? Here we have seen lots of butterflies the last days, but only common ones as far as I can tell.

Do you have a pond too? I have built one but it is too narrow for waterlilies. I tried but no success - leaves and flowers in a heap. yours are nice.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 07/26/2010 - 22:42

Very nice, Rick!  What else do you have in bloom?

Hoy wrote:

How tall does Delphinium brunonianum get?

My plants are only in their second year now.  The one shown is in regular soil and is 50cm tall... I imagine they may be more restrained in a rock garden setting?  Can anyone else comment?


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 07/27/2010 - 12:54

Hoy wrote:

You too do grow houseleeks?

Yes, sempervivums are extremely hardy and very easy to grow here, and therefore very commonly grown.  They do look best growing in rock, though, rather than in regular soil (in which they are quite happy nonetheless).

Hoy wrote:

Why the name "police car moth", does the color resemble that of a police car? Here we have seen lots of butterflies the last days, but only common ones as far as I can tell.

Yes, police cars used to be black with white doors, hence the common name!  (It is no longer the standard colour scheme, though.)  This is a really poor area for butterflies and moths, and for insects in general - we see vastly more in the mountains than we do at home, despite having a yard full of bloom throughout the season.  (We see so few butterflies/moths that we run and tell each other when we do see one!   ::))  A couple of years ago, there was an irruption of Painted Lady butterflies, which was wonderful to see!

Hoy wrote:

Do you have a pond too? I have built one but it is too narrow for waterlilies. I tried but no success - leaves and flowers in a heap. yours are nice.

Thanks!  Growing water lilies is one of my husband's interests.  We have no outdoor ponds, as it's too cool here for even hardy water lilies to do well (I mean for them to be able to act like the flower machines that they should be, in suitable conditions) - just seasonal above-ground ponds in the greenhouse, where the water can be kept constantly warm (with the help of some heaters, when necessary).  Hordes of various tropical fish also enjoy their summers out in the ponds.    


Submitted by Mark McD on Wed, 07/28/2010 - 06:27

RickR wrote:

Iris sintenisii ssp. brandzae, but in May!  (Spring was 3-4 weeks early for us in Minnesota this year.)

Rick, what sun/soil conditions did you give Iris sintenisii ssp. brandzae?  I have seedlings coming along that I planted in the partial shade of very-late-to-leaf-out Chionanthus virginicus, but it's a dryish spot, and the mid-day to afternoon sun does cook the spot, although been hitting up the seedlings with the watering can almost daily, and they're growing and look fine so far.


Submitted by penstemon on Wed, 07/28/2010 - 21:38

McDonough wrote:

So, I was checking into Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina, and couldn't find it initially... what's going on I ask?  Seems that S. nana and S. sapphirina are now two separate species, but initially using the USDA pages

Well, the USDA thinks that Penstemon unilateralis is a valid name for Penstemon virgatus ssp. asa-grayi, which, as far as I know, no authority on the genus accepts, so .....
Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina wanders from its home, it doesn't spread. It leaves its original location for better pastures. S. brittonii and S. angustifolia, on the other hand, spread as fast as a rumor. These last two do have the decency to disappear for the summer, and, if you look at them from a cosmic perspective (like comparing them to the speed at which Veronica oltensis takes over everything in sight), they are fairly slow.

"Forgive the lateness of my reply."


Submitted by Mark McD on Wed, 07/28/2010 - 22:46

Nold wrote:

Well, the USDA thinks that Penstemon unilateralis is a valid name for Penstemon virgatus ssp. asa-grayi, which, as far as I know, no authority on the genus accepts, so .....
Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina wanders from its home, it doesn't spread. It leaves its original location for better pastures. S. brittonii and S. angustifolia, on the other hand, spread as fast as a rumor. These last two do have the decency to disappear for the summer, and, if you look at them from a cosmic perspective (like comparing them to the speed at which Veronica oltensis takes over everything in sight), they are fairly slow.

"Forgive the lateness of my reply."

Bob, the description of Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina as "wandering from its home" versus "spreading" is a useful-to-know nuance of it's growing habit... wish I still had it (Lori, are you listening, grow this plant on someplace, and keep it going, it's a dwarf cutie).

I'm also arriving at a point of assessing certain aggressive spreading tendencies, and with a small plant like Scutellaria angustifolia, and the fact it goes completely dormant and disappears shortly after flowering, one can make greater allowances for its spread when it is non-threatening to other more substantive plants.


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 07/30/2010 - 11:28

Impatiens glandulosa alba
Also in pic
Impatiens balfourii (at base of I. gland.)
Aralia occidentalis (rear left) I've been having to keep it trimmed back so it does take over.  At four years old from seed, it grows larger than Aralia cordata var. sacchalinensis.  It will be replanted in the yard next spring.
Fargesia rufa (partial pic, far right) proving to be a very worth bamboo for my cold climate.
Allium stellatum (bottom left)

Second photo: Basal stem, Impatiens glandulosa alba


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 07/30/2010 - 11:34

At six feet tall, it's a good thing Impatiens glandulosa alba has terminal flowers!

Gosh, I wonder how tall it would get if I didn't have dry soil?


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 07/30/2010 - 11:43

Allium stellatum from seed from a native stand about 50 miles west of me in Minnesota.  For a wild onion, the bulbs are surprisingly tasty!

Campanula americana.  Just ending bloom to the right is Digitalis ferruginea.


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 07/30/2010 - 11:56

RickR wrote:

At six feet tall, it's a good thing Impatiens glandulosa alba has terminal flowers!

Gosh, I wonder how tall it would get if I didn't have dry soil?

They can grow a little taller! I have different color forms of I. glandulosa and they sow themselves all over my place. Have to mow them. I let some grow and the tallest reach about 3m. When I come home in a week I can show you pics.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 07/31/2010 - 22:22

Nold wrote:

Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina wanders from its home, it doesn't spread. It leaves its original location for better pastures.

Well, that sounds better than, say, "rampantly invasive"... Okay, I'll leave it where it is for now, though it will be interesting to see how far it has to go to find better pastures in my little plant gulag.   ;D

RickR wrote:

At six feet tall, it's a good thing Impatiens glandulosa alba has terminal flowers!

Yeah, works for me but I wonder if short people would agree?  ???  :D  
Nice to see some of your garden, Rick.

A few in bloom from seed this year:
1) Asperula boissieri - seems to be a form with rather curly foliage.  From Pavelka: "2200m, Killini Mts., Greece; very dwarf compact silvery-grey cushions; stemless pale to dark rose flowers; limestone rocky slopes, 2006 seed."
2) Silene macrantha, or so it was said to be - it's supposed to have greenish-yellow flowers, however.  Big flowers on a tiny plant, anyway.  (Pavelka: "2000m, Komovi, Montenegro; small tufted plant, 5-15cm, pale green leaves; greenish-yellow flowers, stoney slopes; 2005 seed.")  
3) Arabis androsacea - wonderful furry rosettes, flowers nothing much to write home about yet.  (Seeds from Holubec: "ex. Turkey: Ala Dag, 2200m, limestone scree; small cushions, white hairy rosettes, white flowers on 4cm long stems; 2009 seed."

And:
4) Eryngium alpinum
5) DH's mislabelled rose, that could not have been further from what it was supposed to have been... but sort of appealing.
6) In DH's greenhouse ponds, Nymphaea 'Madame Ganna Walska'
7) Nymphaea 'Helvola'
8 ) Azorella trifurcata, or so it seems from the yellow umbels (vs. greenish-white, apparently, on Bolax gummifera?)
9) Another Inula rhizocephala
10 ) Just a garden shot


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 08/01/2010 - 00:54

[quote author=RickR link=topic=274.msg3515#msg3515 date=1280511815]
Allium stellatum from seed from a native stand about 50 miles west of me in Minnesota.  For a wild onion, the bulbs are surprisingly tasty!

Campanula americana.  Just ending bloom to the right is Digitalis ferruginea.
[/quote
I didn't notice this post while I commented the Impatiens pictures! Both the Allium and the Campanula are new to me. Are the C. americana perennial? Seems to be plants to try here.


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 08/01/2010 - 18:21

Trond, Campanula americana is a biennial, and in many (if not most) gardens a notorious self seeder.  I try not to allow to much seed production.  Most people don't think of it as garden worthy, I don't think. I have found that the plants can be susceptible to a wilt disease.  I know verticillium is present in my land, so I assume it is that. 

Allium stellatum is quite vigorous, and also a vigorous self seeder too, but it is easily prevented but cutting the stalks.  The bicolor umbels, with white buds opening to lavender remind me of fireworks.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 08/01/2010 - 19:56

Thank you for the compliments!  The great thing about photos and posting to remote sites like this, is that no one sees the really ratty parts of the garden.  ;D ;D

And, making another appeal... I'm posting all this stuff, not strictly for compliment-fishing (although I must say that that is very nice  ;D ;D), as in the hopes of encouraging other, so-far silent, members to feel free to share a running journal of their alpines, and gardens in general.  I'm sure we'd all love to see what grows in different areas, and conditions, at different times through the season... (Hey, I need some ideas, too, for my future plantings!)


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 08/05/2010 - 09:00

Arrived home after 5 weeks vaccation. Met by a real wilderness. Have to mow and cut my way through the woodland.
These are not the worst:
The creeping Acaena ovalifolia have grown 3-4ft and cover the path.
Alstroemeria aurea have gotten 3 ft tall and fall over and block the path.


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 08/05/2010 - 09:33

Interesting to see those plants flourishing!  The best I've ever done with Acaena was to have tiny bits survive the winter.  Are the seedpods as painful to step on as they look to be?
I imagine your Alstroemeria are perennial there too... another mind-bending concept for those in this zone!


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 08/05/2010 - 09:46

Skulski wrote:

Interesting to see those plants flourishing!  The best I've ever done with Acaena was to have tiny bits survive the winter.  Are the seedpods as painful to step on as they look to be?
I imagine your Alstroemeria are perennial there too... another mind-bending concept for those in this zone!

The burs are fortunately soft to trample on even with bare feet. And yes, the Alstroemeria aurea is a a hardy perennial here spreading slowly with underground rhizomes.


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 08/06/2010 - 18:07

Okay, persisting with this... won't you join us and post some photos of your gardens too?

1) Even protected under a good-sized Pinus sylvestris 'Watereri', it appears the hail managed to whack a few leaves of this silver-leaved Cyclamen purpurascens
2) A gorgeous and under-appreciated native, Dalea purpurea - it is perfectly well-behaved in the garden, and reaches glorious proportions, even in the poor, dry soil out along our fence... as compared to the very modest little plants (2-3 stems) I see in the wild, oddly enough.
3) Onosma stellulata
4) Telekia speciosa... it's giant leaves are, unfortunately, quite vulnerable to hail damage!
5) Perhaps not the neatest dianthus in form or flower, but the fragrance is intoxicating and most unusual, a sweet perfume rather than the usual clove-spice... Dianthus monspessulanus
6) Verbascum nigrum... this genus is worth all it weeding it causes me.  :)
7) Another Campanula thyrsoides, showing the very hairy flowers and the randomness of bloom along the stem -flowering sometimes starts in the middle, then ends up at the top and base or is all over the stalk at once, odd!
8 ) Not much happening in the troughs, but for Campanula hercegovina, starting to bloom...
9) And this little dianthus.


Submitted by Mark McD on Fri, 08/06/2010 - 18:24

Lori, a nice assortment!  Looking at your much larger plant of a silver-leaved Cyclamen purpurescens will inspire my as-of-yet single leaf young plant of an all-silver C. purpurescens that showed up recently.  And Dalea purpurea, WOW, that's now a *must have* plant on my list, that one really speaks to me.  I think you might have skipped over Verbascum nigrum, I don't see it... I'm anxious to see it.


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 08/06/2010 - 23:50

Holy moly, Lori!  And I was very happy with my Verbascum nigrum, until I see yours.

Here is my Verbascum nigrum wimp.  It's the second flush of flowers, even though I let all the first flush flowers go to seed.  (I'm not sure they produced seed, though.)  I cut the old stalks down just so I could take this pic.  On the left is Allium stellatum from Kandiyohi County, MN, and center is Ruellia humilis.


Submitted by IMYoung on Sat, 08/07/2010 - 06:29

My goodness, Lori.... your Campanula hercegovina is a real beauty  8)

I don't know Dalea purpurea and my search via the RHS plantfinder lists only a couple pf mailorder suppliers in the UK, one of whom hasn't actually got it listed!

Do you get a good seed set on yours ( she asked, plaintively and full of hope.......... ;)  )
M


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 08/07/2010 - 10:57

Maggi, Dalea purpurea is a favourite of bees, and produces seeds generously, and I have several of them - enough to supply every seedex that exists!!  :o  Just PM me with your address and I'll send you seeds later on when they are ready. 
Mark, it is certainly a drought-resistant plant, adapted to the dry plains, with a deep taproot - one that would likely take your current drought and watering ban in stride.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 08/07/2010 - 13:49

Actually, Rick, perhaps I shouldn't say this but the particular V. nigrum I showed is a bit undersized, in comparison to big, mature plants out back where the conditions are a bit kinder!  ;D  They are long-lived perennials here; there too?  In our short season, they have a long bloom, but I've never thought of coaxing two sets of flowers stems out of them... not sure they'd actually manage it here... ?  (Come to think of it, I think I have a test case... some young miscreant broke the flower stems off a young plant out front.  I'll keep an eye on it and see if it is inclined to replace those stems or not.  :) )
Is the Ruellia a native plant there?  I assume it's perennial there, as well?  Very intriguing...
I'm enjoying your photos a lot and hope to see more of your beautiful garden!  So glad you got the digital camera a while back!


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 08/07/2010 - 21:28

1) A sweet little thing, though apparently an annual (dang!) - Omphalodes kuzinskyanae , from the SRGC seedex
2) Campanula dolomitica, purchased this spring.  It will likely get too big (and spreading) for the little tufa garden, but for now, it adds some interest.
3) Not one to stop traffic, exactly - Silene pusilla, from seed this year
4) Looking forward to seeing the flowers on this one  - Onobrychis argyrea - based on my admiration of the beautiful flowers of the foothills forage-crop plant/weed, sainfoin (Onobrychis vicifolia).  The seeds are from Pavelka: "1500m, Urgup, Turkey; tufted perennial, silver hairy leaves, erect-ascending scapes 15-25cm, 3-8 yellow flowers, dry sunny hills."
5) Campanula x carpatica, helping to soften... a little... a trough full of cacti and dasiphora.


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 08/12/2010 - 22:20

So, it's almost mid-August.  What's happening in your gardens?

1) Senecio polyodon, from seed this spring.  (I suspect it is ssp. polyodon, though the seeds from trade didn't specify that.)  I had this for many years some time ago (until it was swamped by other plants) and was never quite certain if it overwintered, or merely seeded... I always suspected it actually overwintered.  
2) Lilium martagon
3) Dracocephalum grandiflorum with Scutellaria alpina
4) Aconitum lycoctonum
5) Carlina acaulis looks most interesting to me at this stage, before the flowers open.
6) Campanula 'Elizabeth Oliver'
7) Lallemantia canescens - only wimpy little plants this year
8 ) Echinops tschimganicus - is this a valid name?  
9) Another Cyclamen purpurascens
10) And finally one from the rock garden, though hardly a spectacular thing... Didymophysa vesicaria - Correction: probably Braya linearis; seeds from Holubec (description: "China: Beima Shan, Yunnan, 4800m, limestone scree, small caespitose plant, 8cm high, white to pink flowers in terminal inflorescence, rounded inflated siliques, 15mm wide; 2008 seed.")

Which leads me to a question for all you enthusiasts out there...

What alpines would one grow for late summer/fall colour and bloom?

Edit:  Oops, here's that elusive cyclamen now!


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 08/14/2010 - 09:20

The Cyclamen has chosen to hide itself, Lori! But you have an immense number of plants flowering all the time. Here some plants grow to immense dimensions instead. They swamp the smaller ones.

Here are some examples:
1) Impatiens glandulifera grows to 3.5-4m. I remove hundreds every spring but they sprout from "millions" of seeds in the moist climate here. I started with 3 plants. I regret that very much!
2) In the Impatiens forest when I look to the sky.
Next postI. glandulifera is annual, this one (not sure of the name) is perennial. Not more than 2" but spreading steadily outwards and swamping smaller neighbours.
3) Aralia something makes 2m canes every year down in my bog.
4) Lysimachia nummularia looks modest but cover all neighbours in short time. It can also grow into smaller shrubs. I use it as groundcover under rhododendrons and other shrubs but it has also occupied parts of the lawn and many beds.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 08/15/2010 - 13:32

Hoy wrote:

But you have an immense number of plants flowering all the time.

The reality is that it is simply a very short, compressed season here - if plants are going to bloom, they only have a short time in which to do it!

Wow, your I. glandulifera "forest" is amazing!  :o

Hoy wrote:

3) I. glandulifera is annual, this one (not sure of the name) is perennial. Not more than 2" but spreading steadily outwards and swamping smaller neighbours.

Similar to my invisible cyclamen, I think this photo of yours chose not to show itself!  Would love to see it though.

Oh, by the way, after a little googling, it seems Echinops tschimganicus is a valid name, so it appears... so that leads me to the next question: Is what I have, it?


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 08/15/2010 - 13:58

I must have been asleep while working with those pictures (that means I am often sleeping, not the first time this).
Not the showiest of plants, but here you are: Impatiens unknown species.

PS. The Cyclamen is very nice, mine haven't started to grow yet. But I have mostly hederifolium and coum.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 08/15/2010 - 22:26

Hmm, interesting perennial impatiens... wonder what the species is? 

1) Verbascum eriophorum, a biennial here.  (I added "here" because some verbascums that act as biennials elsewhere seem to be perennial in colder zones... go figure.)
2) Campanula x tymsonii
3) Flowers now open on Onobrychis argyrea - solid yellow.  (I had rather hoped for some interesting striping or detail on the petals.)


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 08/15/2010 - 23:54

Lori, I also grow Lallemantia canescens.  It looks so terrible now, as many of my alpines.  This year has been a most trying year for them: a drought in early and mid spring, and rain rain rain all summer!  Yesterday six thunderstorms rolled through in just one day! (temps were lowered to 85F day-70F night)  And humidity hadn't dropped below 70% for a week plus.

Iris suaveolens seems relatively fine in the ground, but in pots the foliage is nearly gone, although I do find that the rhizomes are still in tact.  Same with I. reichenbachii. 

I have never had such an infestation of earwigs.  This is my first flower of Dianthus callizonus from seed sown late this spring. And Gentiana tibeticus.  Already the insect has found them.  The Vernonia sp. only grew 8ft this season.


Submitted by Mark McD on Mon, 08/16/2010 - 07:45

RickR wrote:

I have never had such an infestation of earwigs.  
The Vernonia sp. only grew 8ft this season.

Rick, earwigs love the hot, humid conditions that multiple thunderstorms create ;D  Your Vernonia only 8'?  How tall does it grow regularly?  Mine is just coming into bloom (Vernonia novaboracensis), looking like your plant, and it is at 8' right now, but has not grown taller in the past.

Lots of interesting plants shown in this thread, I'm behind in participating and commenting.


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 08/16/2010 - 18:25

Normally 9-10 feet.  I don't have a clue which species it is. 
Is there a way to differentiate Vernonia spp.? 
It came from the garden of a man in our rockgerden society.  He doesn't know its identity either,
and doesn't remember where he got it.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 08/16/2010 - 21:09

Terrific Vernonias!  Whew, 10' tall... !?!  As you know, Rick, I have a soft spot for great, hulking plants (as well as for more alpine-ishly proportioned ones... and the ones in between  :D), so I must give those statuesque beauties a try!

Our season has been rainier and cooler than usual as well - seems like odd weather patterns all over this year.


Submitted by Mark McD on Mon, 08/16/2010 - 21:26

Lori, you posted the same link I was going to post, literally a few seconds before me :D  Might Rick's plant be V. gigantea?
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=242417438

By the way, anyone interested in good "Ironweeds", Vernonia lettermanii is a much smaller fine-leaved plant, with beautiful narrow leaves like Amsonia hubrectii.  I don't currently have it, but it is on my watch list.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 08/16/2010 - 21:30

McDonough wrote:

Lori, you posted the same link I was going to post, literally a few seconds before me :D 

Well, you know... great minds...  ;D


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 08/17/2010 - 13:28

I know I had tried to key the vernonia many, many years ago and gave up.  Maybe eflora was not up or that part finished, I dunno.  But why I hadn't thought about it recently, is a Homer moment (doh!)

So...

What the heck is up with eflora's glossary???  I look words up, there is a page for said word(s), but no definition...
It's not my FF browser, I tried IE and seamonkey(yeah okay it's about the same as FF).  I get this: http://www.efloras.org/glossary.aspx?term_id=12970

Anyway, after learning new and reviewing old definitions, like scaberellous, scaberulose, phyllary, pappi, pannose, urceolate, involucre, obconic, subulate, cypselae, etc., keying was surprisingly easy!

Definitely Vernonia gigantea.  Everything fits.  I looked at the descriptions of all the other species listed, and nothing comes even close in size.  The two largest (fasciculata and flaccidifolia) have other traits besides size that don't match.

I just thought now, what if it isn't North American?
Yow. An investigation for another time.


Submitted by Mark McD on Wed, 08/18/2010 - 08:16

Rick, just checked the eFlora glossary, man is that useless or what?  Instead I googled and used wikipedia to define "pappus":
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pappus_%28flower_structure%29

Now that you learned all those botanical terms specific to Asteraceae, you'll be a pro for further taxonomic sleuthing in Asteraceae. I don't know a couple of those terms either, I had better do some research.

Glad you arrived at an ID on your Vernonia... someone sent me seed of V. gigantea a few years back... I wonder what I did with the seed?

That's funny what you say: "what if it isn't American?".  Good point, there are only 17 described for Flora of North America, but according to a wikipedia link: "Vernonia is a genus of about 1000 species of forbs and shrubs in the family Asteraceae", also found in South America, Asia, and Africa, not to mention the abundant hybrids... you have you're work cut out for you!  You can probably assume however, that your plant is N. American.  Also, some members of the genus in other countries might be ascribed to other genera at this point?  A search on Vernonia species at www.ipni.org comes up with 38 screens of species!!!


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 08/21/2010 - 21:26

Very nice Vernonia flowers - I must try some.

Plenty in bloom here, though little that is alpine-ish or of any great note, but here are some anyway:
1, 2) First bloom on Cyananthus chungdianensis, from seed this year (Pavelka: "3600m, Haba Shan, Yunnan, China; dwarf cushions, small green lobed leaves, many blue flowers, ciliate inside; rocky slopes, meadows, very good.")
3) Omphalodes kuzinskyanae deserves an update... it is really a charming little plant.
4) Inula ensifolia
5) Inula helenium
6) A close-up of Dianthus knappii... which must surely be one of the least-interesting dianthus, notable only in that it is yellow!  But yet I grow it...  ::)
7) Cute little mushroom in woolly thyme
8 ) Penstemon pinifolius 'Mersea Yellow'
9, 10) And, on the "to-do" list for tomorrow, cherry picking... 'Evans', a Prunus cerasus sour cherry cultivar is hardy and a good producer here.  The apples also need to be picked... there will soon be a lot of pie on the menu.  (Mmmm, the breakfast of champions!  ;D )


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 08/21/2010 - 23:50

Forgot to say that I'll certainly save you seed, Lori.  I grow Inula ensifolia 'Compacta'.  I grew one of the large species of inula from seed, but they were aphid magnets.  Amazing how they tolerated the bug, though.


Submitted by Kelaidis on Tue, 08/24/2010 - 05:54

I can't say that late summer is a high point (nothing can match April, May and June in a rock garden!) but my garden continues to have lots of little gems blooming and the overall effect of the alpines is very soothing this time of year and verdant. Amazing how our gardens sustain us! I'm off to Kazakhstan for almost a month, leaving my garden with my wonderful girlfriend, Jan Fahs. It is comforting to hear rain early this morning and hope she gets periodic rains to help maintain this rather extensive collection while I'm gone (can you hear me being a tad nervous?)...

I bought a new camera for my trip, and these are some of the first shots I took yesterday AM: I will be thinking of you all during my travel, although I doubt I will have many chances at internet cafes, and when I do I'll have to spend the time checking in on work and family, so this really fun stuff will have to wait a month! Meanwhile, here's a few glimpses of my Quince Gardens on August 23: the images should be labeled!

1  Adiantum venustum
2  Allium togashii
3  Arum italicum 'Marmoratum'
4  Bulbinella ex Drakensberg
5  Daphne jasminea
6  Escobaria albicolumnaria
7  Hedeoma ciliolata
8  Inula verbascifolia
9  Pyrrhosia ex Mongolia
10 rock garden in AM


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 08/24/2010 - 13:06

Wonderful scenes, Panayoti!  Many exotic things there that I will have to look up.  Thanks for showing how great a well-planned alpine garden can look even, as you say, after most of the bloom has passed - just beautiful!

I'm sure we will all be looking forward to accounts of your trip with eagerness and downright envy!  :D Hope you have a great time!


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 08/24/2010 - 13:43

Very nice, Panayoti! You are lucky to have someone looking after your garden when away. When I come home my garden is completely overgrown. Remarkably how fast and big things grow when they get plenty of moisture.


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 08/25/2010 - 10:08

1) This little Oxytropis megalantha has a bit of rebloom.
2) I'm very pleased with Asyneuma limonifolium - this plant and others have been in bloom since the beginning of July.
3) Osteospermum barberiae var compactum never blooms extravagantly for me - I'm sure it would prefer a hotter, drier spot - but I'm impressed that it has been perennial for 8-9 years now here in zone 3!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Wed, 08/25/2010 - 19:18

Not too much happening in the garden because of extreme drought this summer.  We had some rain last weekend (actually quite a bit of rain) and some things are already trying to green up.  One thing that's been constant is Zinnia grandiflora.  Have to love this plant - it's a late starter and then blooms without stop until hard frost.


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 08/26/2010 - 17:34

That does seem to be a feat with the Osteospermum, congratulations!

I've been impressed with the tenacity of Asyneuma limonifolium as well.  I had it for many years in a pot, until it blew off the patio during a storm, and all I could find was the empty pot!


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 08/28/2010 - 01:23

Spiegel wrote:

Not too much happening in the garden because of extreme drought this summer.  We had some rain last weekend (actually quite a bit of rain) and some things are already trying to green up.  One thing that's been constant is Zinnia grandiflora.  Have to love this plant - it's a late starter and then blooms without stop until hard frost.

Spiegel, I have never seen this Zinnia before. Is the creeping habit normal or due to drought? I would like to have a close-up of the flower too, if possible!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sat, 08/28/2010 - 04:47

It's planted towards the bottom of a slope so gravity seems to have lent a hand.  Also, it is never watered except by nature.  Perhaps it would be more upright with water and better soil?  It's growing here in a very limey, lean scree.  It's found in Colorado and Kansas and southward.  It's been growing here at least seven years and it did take some time to establish.  Spring here is normally cold with lingering frosts so it isn't touched as far as trimming back before mid-May.  I'll try and post a close-up of the flower sometime this weekend.


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 08/28/2010 - 12:22

Thanks  Anne, I must try this one at my summerhouse!

Here are some other plants flowering now in my garden:

1&2) Fuchsia magellanica grows to a huge shrub during the summer and flower throughout the fall.

3&4) Phuopsis stylosa starts flowering in the summer  but produces a dense mat with new shoots flowering from August till the frost comes.

5&6) Tropaeolum ciliatum has not as flamboyant flowers as it sister T. speciosus but a modest habit climbing in the Rhododendrons.

7) Phygelia capensis is a faithful bloomer from July onwards.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Mon, 08/30/2010 - 08:19

Hoy wrote:

Spiegel wrote:

Not too much happening in the garden because of extreme drought this summer.  We had some rain last weekend (actually quite a bit of rain) and some things are already trying to green up.  One thing that's been constant is Zinnia grandiflora.  Have to love this plant - it's a late starter and then blooms without stop until hard frost.

Spiegel, I have never seen this Zinnia before. Is the creeping habit normal or due to drought? I would like to have a close-up of the flower too, if possible!

As promised, if a little late.  Close-up of Zinnia grandiflora flowers.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Tue, 09/07/2010 - 07:49

The drought continues with temps back into the high 80sF but some cooler weather in sight for the end of the week.  No rain forcast for the week, though.  The garden is quiet but the one rain we did have inspired Phlox pungens to start reblooming and frshened up some other plants.  Just a few shots of plants in the crevice gardens.
1.    Coronilla minima
2.    Phlox pungens
3.    Astragalus utahensis
4-5. Eriogonum umbellatum humistratum
6.    Eriogonum ovalifolium


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 09/07/2010 - 11:31

Wow, to live in a place where fuchsias and Phygelia are hardy outdoors!   :o 
I doggedly tried to grow Phuopsis stylosa for years and years, but it would never winter over for me.  However, there is a gentleman in town who always sells it at the plant sale, and it is hardy for him.  I'm baffled.

Love the Zinnia grandiflora, Anne!  I think it would likely be a good candidate for this area.  (I did grow a couple one year, but lost the seedlings in the welter of other foliage; must try again.)
Wonderful foliage in your garden - the Coronilla and Astragalus are terrific.  How nice to have phlox blooming again!  I've never seen that here.  (Is our season too short?  Or does it happen in other people's gardens, but not mine?)


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Tue, 09/07/2010 - 14:21

Lori, I have found this to be true for a number of the western phlox such as Phlox kelseyi (I have had as many as 4 flushes of bloom during one prolonged season), Phlox pulvinata (not as often), Phlox pungens (often) and Phlox hendersonii (rarely).  It's almost like the plant takes a rest and a combination of timely rain and a lot of sun pushes it  to rebloom.  It doesn't seem to hurt the plants at all.  Phlox pungens and Phlox kelseyi do this every year, but this year P. pungens is just coming into rebloom for the first time.  Our summer has been tremendously hot and dry and that probably had a lot to do with it.  We have only had one rain of any note in three months and that was fairly recent. 


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 09/09/2010 - 05:04

Today (or actually yesterday) I found this one still blooming in the garden. Erodium manescavii flowers for months but only few flowers at the time. It also self sow moderately.


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 09/09/2010 - 23:12

Nothing alpine-ish in this lot...
1) Salvia glutinosa
2) Gypsophila oldhamiana
3) Eupatorium cannabinifolium 'Flore Pleno'


Submitted by Mark McD on Sat, 09/11/2010 - 14:55

Skulski wrote:

Serratula coronata

Cool Serratula!  Can you tell us about this one, I think most of us are only familiar with Serratula seoanei, the little pink fall-blooming rock garden staple.


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 09/12/2010 - 02:53

Here are what I saw this morning taking a stroll in the jungle:

1) The ivy, Hedera helix, makes flower buds in the fall and flower throughout the winter. Blue berries develop in the spring.
2) View of the lunch place. It is almost swamped by plants like the strong-growing Kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa). It is from seed and do not set many fruits.
3) The girl's doll's house and my greenhouse. Although I remove 1000s of balsamines, they are everywhere.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Thu, 09/16/2010 - 13:49

In bloom now and grown for years as Allium senescens v glaucum.  Mark, please correct if this is wrong.


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 09/17/2010 - 10:15

Recent pics:
1) Antirrhinum sempervirens - these old plants have been losing vigour over the last couple of years, and I have never been able to collect seed, so I guess I'd best figure out how to do cuttings.
2) A late Penstemon barbatus hybrid.
3) Eryngium planum
4) Gypsophila oldhamiana
5) Heterotheca jonesii - amazingly long bloom period
6) Orostachys spinosa(foreground; semp in background) - not getting quite enough light and too much water
7) Lupinus lepidus utahensis, from seed this year

And today:
8, 9) Granular snow from overnight, lingering on Telekia speciosa and Verbascum nigrum.  This cool, wet summer has continued into an unusually cool, dull September.


Submitted by Sellars on Fri, 09/17/2010 - 11:11

Great pictures Lori!

You have a lot going on in your garden right now.

I love the Lupinus lepidus.  I have seen various sub species in the mountains but have not tried to grow it.  Was it difficult from seed?  It has certainly put on a lot of growth this year.


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 09/17/2010 - 18:08

Thanks, David.  Lupinus lepidus had good germination in 13 days at room temp from SRGC seedex seed.  I think I probably scarified them, but didn't write it down in my notes.


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 09/18/2010 - 14:32

I think this species is self infertile.  I had one bloom this season with thousands of flowers and plenty of pollinators, yet only a few capsules seemed to develop and I couldn't detect any viable seed.  However, this was, in general, a terrible year for pollinating.  Beginning at the end of June, it's been very wet here. 

True to form, only a skeleton remains of that orostachys.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 09/19/2010 - 11:14

Lori, your garden is looking wonderful.  The Lupinus is specially beautiful.  When does your garden (as a rule) start shutting down for the winter?  When do you usually have your first killing frost?


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 09/19/2010 - 19:47

Thanks, Anne.  Big swaths of the garden need renovation, and we are getting at it this year by taking out several big, not very interesting shrubs...  Needless to say, I need both a lot of new, interesting perennials and a lot more alpine beds!  :)
We usually have killing frost by mid-September.  The cloudy, rainy conditions have held it off in the city, but there were 2 consecutive nights of frost in outlying agricultural areas to the east that killed off the crops. 
Fall colour is progressing here... mostly yellow in these parts except for tracts of wild roses (red) in the grasslands and red or purple red-osier dogwood in wetter, brushy areas.  (I hope we don't get a repeat of last year, when sudden very cold weather (-15 deg C or so) and snow at the beginning of October killed the leaves on the trees and resulted in next-to-no fall colour at all, and a very early winter!)


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 09/19/2010 - 21:06

Trond, I had expected babies to be produced when the Orostachys spinosa flowered, but it didn't (!)  Come to think of it, years ago I had another unknown species of orostachys that flowered and didn't make offsets, too.  Hmmm. 

Anyway, I don't worry about it, because for some reason Orostachys spinosa tends to break up into many plants if I grow them in smaller pots.  I have lots.  In fact, this is the first times it has bloomed for me, and I've grown them since 2004!  The one that bloomed was from seed started in 2007 (not by me).


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 09/20/2010 - 01:08

Thanks both. I thought that Orostachys normally made offsets.
I can't understand way this plant is not for sale here - they sell the same 10 types of Sempervivums every year.


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 09/29/2010 - 13:07

Two plants still going strong are the American Polemonium pauciflorum and the Chinese Stylophorum lasiocarpum. Both are short-lived perennials but selfsow moderately. They flower all summer and continue through the fall.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 10/11/2010 - 16:54

Very nice - Polemonium pauciflorum is one of my favourites.  Not familiar with Stylophorum lasiocarpum... though I seem to recall a Stylophorum out in the yard that, unfortunately, never does much of anything.  It's wonderful to have some plants that bloom all summer through!

A few things here, as the season rapidly winds down...
1) Very bizarre flowers of water hawthorn, Aponogeton distachyos, a South African water plant that goes dormant in mid-summer (even here in our short season), then develops leaves and flowers again in fall.
2) Native plant Gutierrezia diversifolia still in bloom, with Carlina acaulis in the back.
3) Lonicera x 'Dropmore Scarlet', against blue skies.
4) Rhododendron mucronulatum 'Crater's Edge'
5) Clematis tubulosa var. davidii, looking very washed out this year.  (It's usually distinctly blue.)
6) Aster ericoides ssp. pansus, another native plant.
7) Onosma stellulata - still blooming in this very cool, wet summer!
8 ) Sempervivum and fall leaves


Submitted by Howey on Sat, 10/16/2010 - 04:35

Right now, mid October, the loveliest plant in my garden is this Callicarpa - not sure of species - with it's eye-catching purple berries.  Not sure how to get seeds for the Seedex - have squashed a few berries but the seeds inside are very tiny and hard to capture.  Hope the attached pic gets through OK. Fran


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 10/16/2010 - 11:19

You can buy food strainers of various weave sizes.  I use a very fine weave that works well with my cactus seed that is suspended in a slimy gel.  The seed is smaller than edible poppy seeds.  Gently swirl and rub the seed against the strainer under running water.

I processed seed from Aralia elata once.  I took a good amount of time.  Later, when I saw what the seed is supposed to look like (larger and heftier), I realized the seeds I extracted were not viable and never really developed, even though the berries looked normal.  Hopefully, this is not the case with your Callicarpa.

Below is my maiden bloom of Aconitum incisifidum.  One slender, 4 ft. stalk that is amazingly sturdy, with still unblemished foliage of heavy substance.


Submitted by Mark McD on Sat, 10/16/2010 - 12:00

Fran, your Callicarpa looks like dichotoma, but I must admit, some Callicarpa species look fairly similar, so don't hold me to that identification.  I get seedlings under my main shrub from the berries dropping, so it might be possible to gather them up and sow them without cleaning... I do that with Arisaema seed all the time and still get good germination.

Rick, I've not heard of that Aconitum, but there are some grand fall blooming ones such as the one you show.  A neighbor gave me a clump that I've been admiring next to their mailbox, growing 5-6 feet, just coming into bloom now, but the plant from a friendly local garden-club lady, latin names are largely optional, so I don't know which one it is.


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 10/16/2010 - 15:40

Howey wrote:

Right now, mid October, the loveliest plant in my garden is this Callicarpa - not sure of species - with it's eye-catching purple berries.  Not sure how to get seeds for the Seedex - have squashed a few berries but the seeds inside are very tiny and hard to capture.  Hope the attached pic gets through OK. Fran

I once learnt from a gardener to let soft berries rot before you try to rinse the seeds. Then the (remains of the) pulp is easy to wash away. (He also said it improves germination by breaking down germination inhibiting chemicals.) If the seeds are very fine you have to use a special sieve, though!


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 10/19/2010 - 11:18

The birches have lost almost all their leaves but other plants in the garden still linger.
1) Remnants from the kitchen garden, a battered artichoke we forgot to eat.
2 and 3) Clematis orientalis (probably 'Bill McKenzie') never gives up till devastated by frost and storm. The plant produces more and more flowers in the fall.
4) The fuchsias are stayers too.
5) The Kiwi plant on the wall grows enormously every year and I have to cut it down so that it don't completely swamp the house. The longest shoots are 4-5 meters.


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 10/19/2010 - 12:15

Hoy wrote:

Howey wrote:

Right now, mid October, the loveliest plant in my garden is this Callicarpa - not sure of species - with it's eye-catching purple berries.  Not sure how to get seeds for the Seedex - have squashed a few berries but the seeds inside are very tiny and hard to capture.  Hope the attached pic gets through OK. Fran

I once learnt from a gardener to let soft berries rot before you try to rinse the seeds. Then the (remains of the) pulp is easy to wash away. (He also said it improves germination by breaking down germination inhibiting chemicals.) If the seeds are very fine you have to use a special sieve, though!

On some genera, such as with Magnolia, I do exactly that... put the fleshy red "berries" in a container of water and soak for up to a week, changing the grungy water every other day.  Then when they're totally soft and mushy (and a bit stinky/slimy) it is easy to squeeze out the fairly large black seed.  The seed is dried and stored in plastic bags with peat moss (only ever-so-slightly moistened), kept in the vegetable crisper in the refrigerator, and in spring when the weather warms up, sow the seed, and you get about 100% germination in a week or two.  But for some seed, I don't bother removing the pulp, and I still get good germination with Arisaema, and self-sown germination with Callicarpa.  

Now I'm wondering how to handle my Ophiopogon umbraticola, the beautiful blue berries are starting to fall off, so time to harvest them... maybe I'll experiment, 1/2 soaked and pulp removed, the other half sown as is.
Addenda:  just harvested two dozen Ophiopogon seeds, and will try my experiment.  Last year I only had 5 seeds produced, and I scratched them all in around the parent plant, but received no germination... that is, until just now when I harvested the seed, there was a single spiralling leaf seedling!  Took a full year to germinate, cool.


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 10/19/2010 - 12:17

Hoy wrote:

2 and 3) Clematis orientalis (probably 'Bill McKenzie') never gives up till devastated by frost and storm. The plant produce more and more flowers in the fall.

Awesome Clematis, just look at all those flowers, so late in the season. 


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 10/24/2010 - 22:23

A last few late-blooming alpines...
1) Marmoritis complanatum (was Phyllophyton complanatum), from Holubec seed this year.  (Description:  "China: Beima Shan, Yunnan, 4500m, limestone scree; beautiful hairy Lamium, 5-12 cm high, imbricate reddish green leaves, long blue axillar flowers, 2008 seeds").
For comparison:
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=88857&flora_id=800
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=88858&flora_id=800
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=88860&flora_id=800

My plants look not too unlike the last photo above... though I'd prefer them to look like the furry little trolls in the first two photos!! I've come to realize the conditions in the new tufa bed are much too rich, and assuming these plants survive the winter, I'll have to starve them into character next year.  (I assure you that next spring's tufa bed addition will be lean and mean!   ;D)

Here's a plant description, and the source of the photo above, and others:
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=210001232

2) Nepeta phyllochlamys has been hardy for a few years now correction: through 1 winter so far... the foliage is pleasantly furry.  Flowers are almost insignificant...  though mildly interesting in extreme close-up!

3) Tanacetum tibeticum from Pavelka seed this year (Description:  "5000m, Tanglang La Pass, Zanskar, India; dwarf suffruticose silvery-grey cushions 5-15cm; erect scapes with 2-5 yellow flowers; 2005 seed").


Submitted by Mark McD on Mon, 10/25/2010 - 08:56

Lori, all three are really nice... I particularly like Marmoritis complanatum (Phyllophyton complanatum), never heard the name Marmoritis, but I'm vaguely familiar with Phyllophyton.  I'll have to check back on the efloras pages, they're timing out so must be busy.

In your threesome, I see an old friend.  Nepeta phyllochlamys I grew from the Turkish MacPhail & Watson expedition back in the latter 1970s, and it proved hardy outside for a number of years, making a most satisfactory fuzzy tumbling mound, great for a rock wall situation.  While the flowers are small, they were so numerous to create a haze of color, so was actually effective in flower.


Submitted by Howey on Tue, 11/02/2010 - 07:31

Not the most exciting time of year for walking in my garden.  However, the first frost came two nights ago leaving in its wake the usual deep green drooping leaves of the Dahlias and the tiny yellow and weedy Coyote tomatoes. The ground is now covered with leaves ready for raking.  Random bits of color - one mauve cluster on the lilac bush, only one pink flower on Erodium richardii, a single wee stalk of that beautiful blue Eritrichium canum, and those hard to kill California poppies running through it all.  The last red rosebud of summer is on the New Dawn Rose and Crysanthemums still in flower.  Those maculate leaves of Arum maculatum are up now and restarting their cycle.  Christmas Cactus and a Bottlebrush have only benefited from a shot of frost and are now indoors for the winter.  Just cut the top off a Juniper which was small but grew without my noticing.  The Smilax vine looks like it will be evergreen.  So now it is just a matter of having faith that the nice things will survive the oncoming cold and snow, the chicken wire around small trees and shrubs will hold out the rabbits and concentrating on feeding the birds.  Time to assess 2010's high and low lights and start to sow more seeds for 2011.
Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b 


Submitted by Mark McD on Thu, 11/04/2010 - 06:00

Frances, it is certainly time to "put the garden to bed"; been doing the same here.  I was curious about your comment on "weedy Coyote tomatoes", as I have not heard of them before, so I googled to learn more about them.  Are the "tomatoes" in the following link look like yours?  Do you cultivate these and enjoy their fruit, or are they a garden escape (ref: weedy)?  Interesting about the lycopene levels.
http://www.aravaipa.com/Coyote-Tomato-Co.htm
"Not a cherry tomato as some claim, but another nightshade species called Solanum pimpinellifolium, the Currant Tomato. Currant tomatoes contain about 40 times more lycopene than common tomatoes!"

We've had a couple nights down to the lower-mid 20s F (hard freeze), but a few things are still flowerings, among them the Asters or Symphyotrichum species.  One of my favorites is Aster laevis or Symphyotrichum laeve var. laeve, which is utterly unfazed by the frost and continues flowering; they have been in flower for 2 months... one of the very best native asters.


Submitted by Howey on Fri, 11/05/2010 - 05:11

Mark, very interesting what you wrote about the Currant Tomato, as that is what it appears to be.  I do not deliberately cultivate it - it just pops up everywhere and is still producing edible fruit in the Friends of the Gardens Courtyard at the University.  Was also interesting to note about the lycopene component which sounds pretty positive to me.  I'd be happy to send you seed if you like? Surprising what turns up at the Local Horticulture Group meetings...that's where we got it.  It is one of the few tomato volunteers that produces fruit before the killing frost comes here.  Nice pictures of the fall asters.  Among the mauve ones in my garden is one that is pink - plan to try to propagate it from seed over winter. A friend sent me pics of a deep pink one in her garden at Iron Bridge (North Shore of Lake Huron) which could be some type of cultivar - nice.  Fran
 


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 11/06/2010 - 01:48

Skulski wrote:

A last few late-blooming alpines...
My plants look not too unlike the last photo above... though I'd prefer them to look like the furry little trolls in the first two photos!! I've come to realize the conditions in the new tufa bed are much too rich, and assuming these plants survive the winter, I'll have to starve them into character next year.  (I assure you that next spring's tufa bed addition will be lean and mean!   ;D)

Lori, Your plants look much more like "furry little trolls" than mine ever shall ( I don't have these plants either). The moist climate and low angle of the sun here make many of the rock plants lax.

Frances, I never "put the garden to bed" if you mean covering plants or cutting down stems and leaves. I think the plants overwinter better if left to themselves. I also let the leaves lie except in the paths.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 11/06/2010 - 11:06

Very interesting indeed about the "coyote tomato" - one can't help but be intrigued by the description of "earthy, fruity, outrageous flavor"!   :D

We don't usually do much of any "putting the garden to bed" here either - nothing gets covered, or cut off, normally.  The exception this year was to appease my husband by cutting off the taller perennials right along the sidewalks, while things were still dry and the weather was good, in order to make snow shoveling easier later on.  Even that I find strangely depressing to do - I really prefer to leave things standing 'til spring!  :( We don't do any fussing around with leaves either... they just stay where they collect.  (Not having any lawn makes it easier to follow a laissez faire policy on leaves, too, of course!)

In this amazingly warm fall, there are still a few things in active bloom, and some nice colour here and there:
1) Senecio polyodon, one of those amazingly hardy South Africans
2) Geranium x magnificum
3) A sparse few blooms on Androsace septentrionalis, self-seeded from NARGS seed... a much different and looser form than what I see in the mountains here
4) Jovibarba fall colour
5) Hylotelephium 'Autumn Joy' (or similar)
6) Veronica spicata ssp. incana 'Silbersee'
7) Arabis procurrens 'Variegata'
8 ) The ever-reliable and long-blooming Campanula rotundifolia
9) Geranium sanguineum


Submitted by Mark McD on Sat, 11/06/2010 - 18:46

Lori, you're getting some great fall color there, and some nice late blooms... very colorful.

Hmmm, it seems that people don't like cutting back plants and perennials in the fall.  Every year it's the same story for me, in spring stuff starts growing so fast that I work feverishly to do spring cleanup, cut back old foliage, twigs and stems, before new plant growth gets in the way and makes the task much harder to do.  So, I now try and get as much pruning, cleanup, shearing, and debris removal done in late fall, so in spring I can concentrate on less mundane activities and enjoy the spring show.

So, today I went ahead and started shearing back Epimedium foliage.  With a pair of sharp shears, it took me about 15 minutes to trim back about 25 epimedium plants near my deck... if I wait until spring and have to do micro-surgery to clear out the unsightly twigs and battered winter persistent foliage, being careful not to cut off spring shoots and flower buds, it might take me a couple hours.  Yes, I'll miss some of the colorful foliar interest, but next spring I can just watch my "eppies" come to life without worry about cleanup.  I did leave the leaves on a couple evergreen species, and depending on their condition next spring will either leave them on or cut them back if beaten up.  Here are before, during, and after shots of this particular epimedium planting.

I need to do the same thing with Allium beds, tons more epimediums, and with other perennials; I hope the season holds out before the first big snow.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 11/07/2010 - 14:27

Mark, I wait until I see bare ground sometime during the winter and cut all the epimediums at that time.  We always seem to have a snow-free period now.  It's too early then to have to worry about spring shoots or buds.  I used to wait until the snow melted but always lost a few small shoots no matter how careful I tried to be.  We just don't seem to get the kind of continuous snow cover we once did.  All of "my" snow seems to be dumped well south.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 11/14/2010 - 08:02

Some pictures taken about 10 days ago in this long, extended fall.  Most of the garden has sensibly retired for the winter.  Here are the last holdouts.
1. One flower on Petrocallis pyrenaica
2. Heterotheca jonesii scattered blooms
3. The last Salvia
4. Snake in trough - still hasn't moved
There was a picture of epimediums in their fall color, but lost it when I was resizing pictures, oops.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 11/14/2010 - 09:05

How clever of you to identify it.  You're exactly right.  Actually, I bought this at a roadside cafe in Utah years ago as a replacement for a wonderful snake that we lost to a pair of red-tailed hawks.  It was made from a willow branch and painted by the artist Jack Lambert.  He did too good a job.  We saw the hawks, who live here, dive down to the back patio.  When we investigated we found the snake in pieces where one had grabbed it with its talons and released it in disgust.  They've left the replacement strictly alone.


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 01/17/2011 - 04:14

Dave, that is a plant to grow! I have started collecting Arisaema but I plant all in my garden hoping the best!
I have none with such fine markings though.


Submitted by Toole on Tue, 01/25/2011 - 20:15

Hoy wrote:

Dave, that is a plant to grow! I have started collecting Arisaema but I plant all in my garden hoping the best!
I have none with such fine markings though.

Thanks Trond

I've just about finished the remodelling of another woodland plot so eventually all the potted Arisaemas will be planted out.....

Finally started seriously using my new SLR camera which i purchased 3 months ago.
Close up pic of a Geranium sps .

Cheers Dave


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 01/25/2011 - 20:40

oooh Dave, that photo is worth clicking on (quick everyone, click that photo to see the enlarged view), just look at the tracery of blue veins against the pink petals... wonderful detail.  Any idea about what Geranium species or hybrid it might be?  There have been some posts on SRGC lately with some really good links to Erodium and Geraniacaea that capture the imagination during these winter days (well, at least winter days for us northern hemisphere folks ;))


Submitted by Toole on Tue, 01/25/2011 - 21:22

Yes i do know the name Mark --it's just that i can't remember for the moment .... :-[ sigh!
As soon as it comes to me i'll post it's name .

I'll go out and obtain a picture of the clump once this welcome rain stops. .  i've had this plant for at least 20 years--a real 'go doer' in the garden here --easy to divide.
Not sure if it sets seed as i tend to cut the stems and sometimes the foliage later in the season when the growth gets a bit floppy.

Cheers Dave.


Submitted by Fermi on Wed, 01/26/2011 - 17:46

I'm glad that Dave has started off the new year on this thread - I can now post a few pics of our garden in "high summer" - the rains so far haven't let us feel it's really summer yet! At least it's a change from the usual heat and drought!
The first is a calochortus which has just opened the last flower for the season  Calochortus fimbriatus.

The next is a hybrid Lilium "Pappo's Beauty"

and then "Lady Alice"

cheers
fermi


Submitted by Mark McD on Wed, 01/26/2011 - 20:53

Fermi, from what I've seen on postings on SRGC by folks from Australia, it seems that the genus Calochortus do well in Australia.  I bet there are few here in the US that can boast growing C. fimbriatus, a fantastic species and VERY NEW to the taxonomic scene described just 10 years ago in 2001.  What is your source for this species?  How many Calochortus do you grow and what is your basic cultivation regimen?

PS.  You get a Gold Star, you wasted no time in reading my FAQ on how to use the syntax for "inline" image attachments on the forum, this was just added today!  Of course, you've been using that technique on SRGC already, so maybe I should just award a Silver Star ;D. The FAQ and others are found here: http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?board=1.0


Submitted by Booker on Thu, 01/27/2011 - 12:09

Many thanks to Mark for explaining how to inset images into a posting ... this is simply a test to see how easy or difficult this might be.

All the images were captured during a brief visit to Ness Gardens on the Wirral in north-west England.

None of the images will be titled.

This is purely a test.

Images for enjoyment only.

May post more later.

Few more to post.

Not as easy to negotiate as posting all at the end.

Only a few more ...

Simply a test ...

Finally reached the end!


Submitted by Booker on Thu, 01/27/2011 - 13:01

Well, the test certainly worked and could prove indispensable in the future.

All the images were captured in late August 2010.


Submitted by Mark McD on Thu, 01/27/2011 - 16:12

Booker wrote:

Well, the test certainly worked and could prove indispensable in the future.

All the images were captured in late August 2010.

Hi Cliff, glad the inline image attachments syntax is working out for you.  What's the blue-fruited beauty above?


Submitted by Booker on Thu, 01/27/2011 - 19:50

McDonough wrote:

Booker wrote:

Well, the test certainly worked and could prove indispensable in the future.

All the images were captured in late August 2010.

Hi Cliff, glad the inline image attachments syntax is working out for you.  What's the blue-fruited beauty above?

Hi Mark,
I didn't collect names along with the images, but I believe (from memory) that this was Dianella tasmanica.


Submitted by Sellars on Thu, 01/27/2011 - 21:31

The Northern Hemisphere is starting to wake up.

This is Lewisia brachycalyx emerging in the rock garden today.

I always find it exciting to see new growth on plants that estivate, given the uncertainty of whether they made it through the summer and fall.  Lewisia rediviva emerges in October in our garden but Lewisia brachycalyx and Lewisia nevadensis don't show up until January or February, eventually flowering in spring before disappearing again.

W.H.N. Preece writing in 1937 said this about Lewisia brachycalyx:

It is no easy matter to find suitable words, nor to coin adeqaute phrases to portray such ethereal beauty, ineffable purity and gleaming loveliness in blossoms at once transluscent, ice-white and crystalline".

Fine words indeed for a very lovely plant. I hope it grows faster than whatever is nibbling on the leaves.


Submitted by Fermi on Mon, 01/31/2011 - 23:57

McDonough wrote:

Fermi, from what I've seen on postings on SRGC by folks from Australia, it seems that the genus Calochortus do well in Australia.  I bet there are few here in the US that can boast growing C. fimbriatus, a fantastic species and VERY NEW to the taxonomic scene described just 10 years ago in 2001.  What is your source for this species?  How many Calochortus do you grow and what is your basic cultivation regimen?

PS.  You get a Gold Star, you wasted no time in reading my FAQ on how to use the syntax for "inline" image attachments on the forum, this was just added today!  Of course, you've been using that technique on SRGC already, so maybe I should just award a Silver Star ;D. The FAQ and others are found here: http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?board=1.0

Hi Mark,
We got this Calochortus under its synonym C. weeddii ssp vestus from a local bulb supplier, Marcus Harvey in Tasmania.
Other Calochortus which we grow include C. superbus (the first one I grew to flowering size from seed from the NARGS Seedex I think), C. splendens, C. albus, C. macrocarpus (only in a pot at present), C.argillosus, C. amabile, C. luteus, C. uniflorus, C. catalina and C. clavatus. Most were grown from seed but we have bought bulbs of the last 4 as well. C. superbus and C. splendens have produced the most impressive displays so far in terms of numbers.
Apart from those that never make it out of the seed-pot, I plant the bulbs out in late summer/early atutumn into raised beds which are basically our local "adobe" clay ameliorated with plenty of grit/sand and sometimes a bit of compost and gypsum.
We try not to water the bulb areas during the summer but this year that has been futile; it remains to be seen how many have survived the wet weather!
cheers
fermi
PS yes, I've had some practice on the SRGC Forum at posting pics ;D but I needed your FAQ to let me know we could do the same here now (it didn't work a while back when I tried!)


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 02/01/2011 - 21:30

Fermi wrote:

PS yes, I've had some practice on the SRGC Forum at posting pics ;D but I needed your FAQ to let me know we could do the same here now (it didn't work a while back when I tried!)

Fermi, that's quite a good representation of Calochortus species!  I hope the recent rains In Australia that were so prominent in the news recently have no ill effect on your Calochortus bulbs, or other plants for that matter.

Yes, the "inplace" loading of photos here previously showed a bug whereby images were repeated (doubled), but we got that fixed and the FAQ tells how to do it now.


Submitted by Kelaidis on Fri, 02/04/2011 - 18:42

Aaah Fermi, you know how to rub salt in wounds! We just had -20F in parts of this area a few days ago, and there is snow everywhere. America is in the thralls of winter, and you show us lilies and calochorti! You are a sadist, my man!


Submitted by Fermi on Mon, 02/07/2011 - 16:28

Kelaidis wrote:

Aaah Fermi, you know how to rub salt in wounds! We just had -20F in parts of this area a few days ago, and there is snow everywhere. America is in the thralls of winter, and you show us lilies and calochorti! You are a sadist, my man!

Panayoti! You should know that Indians don't waste salt onwounds - we use chilli powder! ;D Besides the pics of plants flowering here is only to remind you that spring and summer are not far away.
Of course this side of the world is suffering floods and fires while you are under snow - it's a crazy world! The alternation between heatwave and downpour is playing havoc with some plants in the Rock Garden; Genista pilosa which was a lovely cascading mat is now seriously burned off and 2 Daphne alpina shrubs look like they have succumbed. But I'm sure my losses will be nothing compare to what the extreme cold is doing to some of your gardens over there.
cheers
fermi


Submitted by Fermi on Thu, 02/24/2011 - 23:54

Some new flowers this week,
Rhodophiala bifida

Lycoris sprengeri

And some belladonna Lilies, Amaryllis belladonna hybrids

cheers
fermi


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 02/25/2011 - 21:52

Very nice, Fermi.

I didn't know there were any Lycoris with such wide petals.  And such a symmetrical flower, too!


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 02/26/2011 - 03:46

Beautiful "lilies"!
I am looking forward to see mine when they hopefully reach flowering size. I have sowed different monocots from Chilean seed, among them some Rhodophiala spp and have potfulls of seedlings. ;D


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 03/04/2011 - 09:15

Today I didn't walk in the garden but chopped a yew to firewood. A foggy but not cold day +7C now.
Rick, did you say you were fan of brown?
Here are some browny colors ;D


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 03/04/2011 - 11:42

Hoy wrote:

Today I didn't walk in the garden but chopped a yew to firewood. A foggy but not cold day +7C now.
Rick, did you say you were fan of brown?
Here are some browny colors ;D

Nice views! I don't like overcast days, usually, but I do like fog! What is the large broadleaf evergreen?


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 03/04/2011 - 13:17

cohan wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Today I didn't walk in the garden but chopped a yew to firewood. A foggy but not cold day +7C now.
Rick, did you say you were fan of brown?
Here are some browny colors ;D

Nice views! I don't like overcast days, usually, but I do like fog! What is the large broadleaf evergreen?

Thanks! Fog has it's charm but not if it is foggy too often >:(
The broadleaf evergreen is a Hedera, probably H hibernica, climbing in a common birch.


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 03/04/2011 - 19:00

Hoy wrote:

Rick, did you say you were fan of brown?

You got it!

Is that a Pinus parviflora in the first pic?
I sure wish I could grow true cedars, ANY true cedars.
And what is the broadleaf evergreen tree?


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 03/05/2011 - 00:06

RickR wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Rick, did you say you were fan of brown?

You got it!

Is that a Pinus parviflora in the first pic?
I sure wish I could grow true cedars, ANY true cedars.
And what is the broadleaf evergreen tree?

Right on spot! Pinus parviflora. The other pine there to the right is an American species, P contorta. Between them is a Thuja, maybe T plicata.
When you say true cedars, do you mean Cedrus? -I grow three species: C deodara, libanotica and atlantica. They are  nice trees. You can get a glimpse of C atlantica 'Glauca' in the top left corner of the 3rd picture, the other green stuff in the left is Sciadopitus verticillata.

The broadleaf evergreen tree is not a tree but Hedera hibernica climbing in a common birch.


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 03/05/2011 - 15:45

Hoy wrote:

Right on spot! Pinus parviflora. The other pine there to the right is an American species, P contorta. Between them is a Thuja, maybe T plicata.
When you say true cedars, do you mean Cedrus? -I grow three species: C deodara, libanotica and atlantica. They are  nice trees. You can get a glimpse of C atlantica 'Glauca' in the top left corner of the 3rd picture, the other green stuff in the left is Sciadopitus verticillata.

The broadleaf evergreen tree is not a tree but Hedera hibernica climbing in a common birch.

Yes, I was alluding to the Cedrus atlantica (which has had a name change, I believe).  I did guess the Pinus contorta, but I never would have thought that tree (below) was a Sciadopitys.  I would have thought it would have much longer pseudo-needles in your climate.  Unless, is it growing in clay based soil?

The Hedera hiberica is impressive, at least to me.  We are very lucky to even get Hedera helix (or closely related) to even survive on the ground, let alone climb.


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 03/06/2011 - 00:25

The Sciadopitys really has very large needles, the picture lies :-X When I come home next week I'll show you! No clay here - all soil is peat-based (naturally) except some sandy soil at the lowest-lying part.


Submitted by Fermi on Mon, 03/07/2011 - 00:17

The "sedums" are doing really well this year after all that summer rain we got! This is one of the Hylotelephiums, possibly "Autumn Joy"

Clematis "Golden Tiara" is also still looking good with new flowers adorning the silky seed heads,

A native "Bluebell", Wahlenbergia stricta is liking conditions in a sand-bed

A rather pale cutie is this Linum tenuifolium grown from Seedex 2010(?)

which I'm hoping will re-seed.

cheers
fermi


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 03/07/2011 - 21:22

Beautiful, Fermi - how nice to be reminded of summer turning to fall!  I've been intrigued for some time by Wahlenbergia (being kind of a campanula nut) but I suspect they'd only act as annuals here. 

I like the Linum tenuifolium too.  I have found growing Linum from seed surprisingly difficult (well, surprising especially given that one sees entire blue fields of flax in these parts!) 


Submitted by Boland on Tue, 03/08/2011 - 12:09

Trond, I live in the land of fog and it can get darn depressing day after day.  having said that, I could use some now as fog is great at melting snow...and we still have scads of that!  It has been sunny and 8 C this past 2 days so the snow is settling but there is just so much on the ground...still about 3-4 feet over most of my back yard.  I actually dug out my crevice garden as I am desperate to see some soil!


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 03/08/2011 - 12:53

Todd wrote:

Trond, I live in the land of fog and it can get darn depressing day after day.  having said that, I could use some now as fog is great at melting snow...and we still have scads of that!  It has been sunny and 8 C this past 2 days so the snow is settling but there is just so much on the ground...still about 3-4 feet over most of my back yard.  I actually dug out my crevice garden as I am desperate to see some soil!

Daytime fog is not at all common here, its usually a nighttime (or at least morning.evening) phenomenon, though at this elevation we are sometimes in the bottom of the clouds ;)

3-4 feet is a lot of snow--we have that much around paths and drives where its been piled up from shovelling, otherwise probably more like 13-18inches in most places, tending to less around spruce and in mixed woods (except north side of woods in the low areas where willows grow, which always has the most snow).. no doubt it will stay here much longer than in Newfoundland, though anything can happen this time of year--Wed +2C, Fri -8C with possible snow (they downgraded periods of snow to 60%chance of flurries, yay!)

A random image from warmer days, an Achillea millefolium growing just up the road--the first time I have seen pink in the wild populations! The close-up may or may not make it look pinker than in real life--it was pale but noticeable as I rode past on my bike....
And one of its basically white cousins with a pollinator...


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 03/08/2011 - 13:28

Todd wrote:

Trond, I live in the land of fog and it can get darn depressing day after day.  having said that, I could use some now as fog is great at melting snow...and we still have scads of that!  It has been sunny and 8 C this past 2 days so the snow is settling but there is just so much on the ground...still about 3-4 feet over most of my back yard.  I actually dug out my crevice garden as I am desperate to see some soil!

Todd, fog is not uncommon in spring when the air warms and the sea still is cold but fortunately we are spared the worst as it tends to be more foggy at the other side of the fjord and nearer the coast (the fjord runs south - north here and I live at the east side).

Cohan, is yarrow a native plant at your place? Here pink (light pink, not dark) yarrows are not uncommon, especially at our cabin in the mountain where I am now. Not much snow here - 3/4m I think. Haven't had time skiing though, the sewage is frozen further down the valley and all the neighbors "spent food" has found it's way up through our toilet -  the floors of the bathroom, toilet and entrance flooded with..... Have done the worst cleaning job ever!

And I can't comment on Fermi's pictures, I can't see them!
(Trond, Fermi's photos have been fixed - Mark McD.)


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 03/08/2011 - 16:59

I know the snowdrops I show here are very common, but they are the harbinger of spring in my garden, followed closely by Crocus vitellinus, and this year Colchicum kesselringii that a friend sent last fall, is blooming now too.  The yard and gardens are still covered with an 18" glacial layer of hard-pack ice, but in a couple spots, such as the warm sunny south side of the house, snow receded and a few bare bits of ground can be seen, and much to my surprise, there were snowdrops!  Nice :D


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 03/09/2011 - 00:55

Hoy wrote:

Todd wrote:

Trond, I live in the land of fog and it can get darn depressing day after day.  having said that, I could use some now as fog is great at melting snow...and we still have scads of that!  It has been sunny and 8 C this past 2 days so the snow is settling but there is just so much on the ground...still about 3-4 feet over most of my back yard.  I actually dug out my crevice garden as I am desperate to see some soil!

Todd, fog is not uncommon in spring when the air warms and the sea still is cold but fortunately we are spared the worst as it tends to be more foggy at the other side of the fjord and nearer the coast (the fjord runs south - north here and I live at the east side).

Cohan, is yarrow a native plant at your place? Here pink (light pink, not dark) yarrows are not uncommon, especially at our cabin in the mountain where I am now. Not much snow here - 3/4m I think. Haven't had time skiing though, the sewage is frozen further down the valley and all the neighbors "spent food" has found it's way up through our toilet -  the floors of the bathroom, toilet and entrance flooded with..... Have done the worst cleaning job ever!

And I can't comment on Fermi's pictures, I can't see them!
(Trond, Fermi's photos have been fixed - Mark McD.)

I have to apologise for my brain apparently not functioning this morning, I somehow thought I was posting to image of the day, earlier...lol Oh well, I suppose it was only somewhat off topic  :rolleyes:
Trond: yes yarrow- Achillea millefolium - is a very very common native here, but nearly all white--till now! I was also pleased to find A sibirica the last two summers--just an occasional plant--maybe only in one spot, and last year I got some seed, I really like the form/foliage of sibirica: taller, straighter and neater..
I'd be interested in seeing your pink yarrows; I may yet break down and get some seed of hybrids, I really do like some of the colours, and want some other species--rock garden and larger--I want one of the 'white' leafed yellow flowered tall ones..; I have seedlings from last year (hopefully alive under the snow) from Gardens North of ACHILLEA sibirica var. camtschatica--which has pink flowers, very different foliage from the regular form too, it seems, but haven't seen mature foliage yet..


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 03/09/2011 - 12:36

Cohan, I'll show you pictures of the yarrows - but you have to wait some months ;D I haven't pictured yarrows, they are ubiquitous!

Nice to see snowdrop, Mark. I'll take a look at mine when I've time and it is sun!


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 03/09/2011 - 12:52

Hoy wrote:

Cohan, I'll show you pictures of the yarrows - but you have to wait some months ;D I haven't pictured yarrows, they are ubiquitous!

Nice to see snowdrop, Mark. I'll take a look at mine when I've time and it is sun!

I know what you mean, Trond; I try to photograph every flowering species, especially when they first start.. after they are going for a long time, I tend to taper off..lol--stilll, the summer is so short, there are very few flowers I get tired of (apart from the cursed foreign buttercup, and slightly less, clover and dandelions!)


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 03/11/2011 - 10:18

A little walk in the garden between the showers - rain - hail - sleet! Got an inch of white stuff last night and early morning but it thawed during the day.

The snowdrops dropped a little by the weight of the white stuff and a Helleborus thibetanus takes it time to flower.

   

The Hellebores in the wood fared better and the snow receded quickly. Some Crocuses struggle, not with snow but with old leaves.

         


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 03/12/2011 - 01:01

Congratulations, Trond--spring finally arrived for you! It'll be a while yet here, so its good to see some photos from elsewhere ..


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 03/13/2011 - 00:43

cohan wrote:

Congratulations, Trond--spring finally arrived for you! It'll be a while yet here, so its good to see some photos from elsewhere ..

Thanks Cohan! But spring comes and goes here and is slow in progress. The spring does last to May :o We can still get snow and sleet :(


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 03/13/2011 - 11:11

Hoy wrote:

cohan wrote:

Congratulations, Trond--spring finally arrived for you! It'll be a while yet here, so its good to see some photos from elsewhere ..

Thanks Cohan! But spring comes and goes here and is slow in progress. The spring does last to May :o We can still get snow and sleet :(

Spring comes and goes here too, but we wont have any wildflowers until end of April or early  May, I don't yet have much planted for spring to make it earlier, my one spring bulb bed turned out to be  a cold spot, so its not early..lol
This week we will have days well above freezing, but there will be snow again, we aren't safe until late May/June....


Submitted by Fermi on Tue, 03/15/2011 - 00:58

And here it is starting to feel like autumn with the "late bulbs" like Lycoris coming into bloom,
Lycoris elsae

and the red one we grow as L. radiata but which I'm told isn't!

The colchicums are also doing their stuff: Colchicum cilicium (pale form) is slowly clumping up

cheers
fermi


Submitted by Kelaidis on Thu, 03/17/2011 - 18:18

We've just been through a toasty week and lots is coming into bloom: there are a bank of daffodils out on the parking lot of the gardens in full bloom, and the first Magnolia stellata opened by the Botanic Gardens house and the first corydalis are out (of course I forgot to photograph all these!)...but there are enough things to give a taste of the blustery steppe spring on the Colorado piedmont...I start with Bulbocodium vernum, which seems to do well in a variety of sites around Denver Botanic Gardens: I neglected to photograph the little dark pink forms of Colchicum szovitsii that have just opened at my house (much daintier). Two shots of my best Cyclamen coum--one with back lighting and the other not. These have finally found a shady site they like. Then there is the ever charming Eranthis hyemalis: can one ever have enough of this? The Fritillaria raddeana alarms me by its early bloom: I don't think we have as attractive a form as I've seen in pictures: it is rather greenish. Our F. imperialis are just breaking ground and this is in full bloom: makes me nervous since we are sure to have some more very cold weather. And Christmas roses have been blooming for months and they are now turning deep reds as they set seed....I've barely scratched the surface! I will have to do another post!


Submitted by Kelaidis on Thu, 03/17/2011 - 18:32

I have just posted ten pix, and they were not enough! Way too much is already blooming. I have over 30 different kinds of things in bloom at home, and the Gardens are exploding! The Galanthus are starting to go over in more exposed spots (although there are still a few patches of snow in the darker corners where they'll be coming up for some weeks to come!) The first picture is of a giant form of Galanthus elwesii I got from Don Hackenberry 30 years ago! The next is a more typical form that has naturalized at the gardens...and the nivalis 'Viridapice' which I find to be quite vigorous. I have a special spot in my heart for reticulate irises, and this seems to be a banner year for them. I have two shots of Iris danfordiae, which seems to perenniate if you can keep it dry in summer (we grow it in groundcovers or grass to achieve that). I have 'Katharine Hodgekin' all over my garden (I blogged about it recently as well: there's quite a story about it:http://prairiebreak.blogspot.com/2011/03/whats-in-name.html). And I include closeups of 'Harmony' and 'Pixie' two of my favorite dark blues. We have drifts of 'Harmony' on a steep slope with blue gramma grass where they are quite happy. I guess you will miss my pix of early Muscari, townsendias, hellebores galore, a bevy of early drabas, and so on and so forth: the new year is rushing headlong and dragging me with it. There's nothing like early spring! (Or is it late winter?)


Submitted by Mark McD on Thu, 03/17/2011 - 21:11

Fermi wrote:

And here it is starting to feel like autumn with the "late bulbs" like Lycoris coming into bloom,
Lycoris elsae
cheers
fermi

Fermi, great fall color, as we're just starting to emerge from under a mantle of snow and ice in the northern hemisphere.  I love the white Lycoris, a genus I have not succeeded with yet, in spite of getting some bulbs from Mr. Lycoris himself, James Waddick.  The name Lycoris elsae is probably referring to Lycoris elsiae Traub, Pl. Life xiv. 43 (1958).

It is a perplexing entity, this elsiae, and here are some links I found that help provide clues to the mystery:

[pbs] Lycoris straminea, houdyshellii, and L. elsiae:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/pbs/2010-September/038606.html

"Some authors describe that Lycoris albiflora Koidzumi is a natural hybrid of Lycoris radiata (L’Héritier) Herbert and Lycoris traubii Hayward"

Found a link for Lycoris albiflora, a species from Korea and China, with the synonym of Lycoris elsiae Traub
http://flowers.la.coocan.jp/Amaryllidaceae/Lycoris%20albiflora.htm
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200028053

All I could do here is raise questions, sorry, I don't have any answers, just not very experienced with the beautiful genus Lycoris.


Submitted by Mark McD on Thu, 03/17/2011 - 21:23

Panayoti, your spring season seems so much more advanced than New England, I'm so jealous.  Today it suddenly warmed up and reached 60 F (15.5 C), but it seemed semi-stupid as most of the yard and garden are still covered with a 12" thick (or thicker in places) mantle of snow, the ground still frozen beneath.

Of your floral spectacle, I really liked Galanthus nivalis 'Viridapice', such drooping elegance (and it actually looks different than many snowdrops). ;)

Now I've seen plenty of photos of Iris danfordiae, that elfin golden yellow reticulate Iris, but interplanted with glowing orange Sedum rupestre 'Angelina', sheer brilliance!

And the shot of blue pools of Iris reticulata 'Harmony' amidst the pale amber of dried grasses, who would have thought of such a combination, double brilliance!


Submitted by Mark McD on Thu, 03/17/2011 - 21:51

Today it was suddenly very warm, almost summer like, after such a long spell of cold and freezing weather.  The snow has receded from a few areas where spring bulbs are plants.  Yesterday, a patch of ground where Crocus biflorus ssp. isauricus was planted, the receding snow-pack revealed flattened buds of this crocus squashed and lying miserably under the weight of the snow, but today with the warmth, they all popped open.

Stepping away a little bit is a reminder that winter snow is still predominant; we'll need a number of such warm days to melt the snow-pack layer.


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 03/18/2011 - 01:11

Panayoti--what a wealth of spring glory! I can only second some of Marks specifics, esp for the irises, Love the wild form of reticulata..

Mark, congrats on blooms! Everything here still looks like your last pic.... nothing here can bloom out of the snow, unless its a late spring snow after the pack has melted and ground thawed! The ground will still be solidly frozen in most places until some time after snowmelt...


Submitted by Howey on Fri, 03/18/2011 - 05:22

Yesterday, St. Patrick's Day, was the first day it was possible to see signs of life in the garden - Daphne mezereum, which was prostrate under the snow, has straightened up and the flower buds are swelling - lots of yellow Winter Aconite, Iris reticulata shoots and snowdrops.  Tulip and Hyacinths under the house eaves are up 3 inches now and Belladonna lilies which I transplanted into the University Courtyard (home of FOGS) last year, have survived and are coming up in good health.  Over in the tiny bog that one of our members created last year, the Lobelia cardinalis "placemats" look full of health.  In my own garden Lobelia cardinalis alba, Arum maculatum and that wonderful Polygala appear not to have been hurt at all by our really terrible winter.  Calycanthus floridus is just a mass of disjointed twigs - it did suffer.  However, some of those twigs, which I brought indoors and put into a vase with Cornus mas branches, have begun to leaf out, as has a small pot of Begonia sutherlandii.  No pictures yet but perhaps soon?  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 03/18/2011 - 06:01

Here it is back to square one - 10cm of wet snow this morning! But as the ground no longer is frozen I hope it will thaw during the day. This is quite normal for March weather though.

Fermi, wether it is Lycoris radiata or not don't matter to me! It is a nice plant anyway.

Kelaidis, you do not lack plants! I believe you have a lot of sun in daytime but that you experience freezing temps during nighttime?


Submitted by Kelaidis on Fri, 03/18/2011 - 20:00

Hoy,
    We get over 300 days of sun a year (more than Cairo and Athens! They have more clouds in winter than we do)...but we get frost until May. We often have Magnolias crisped...although the coming week is supposed to stay mild. I would be surprised if we don't get some very cold days still this winter.


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 03/18/2011 - 20:34

Beautiful shows, Panayoti, Mark and Trond!  Wonderful fall flowers from the other side of the world too, Fermi!

The big melt is on here, and as this year's heavy snow rapidly disappears, it's encouraging to see signs of life...
Some native and exotic plants in juxtaposition -  bristlecone pine, Astragalus angustifolius and kinnikinnick (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)

The following few are new from last year:
A teensy rosette of Dionysia involucrata, looking reasonably lifelike...

Papaver kluanense

Physaria alpina

Anacyclus marrocanus

Eriogonum saxatile

Elsewhere in the garden:
New growth on Caltha leptosepala

Evergreen foliage on Epimedium x versicolor 'Sulphureum' and a hellebore:


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 03/18/2011 - 22:21

Lori, you are way ahead of me! I we get more weather like last week (+5C and higher) the snow will go fast, but we are back to barely above 0 days, or below; plus, much of my place is shaded, esp until the sun is higher, so we keep snow longer, except for a few spots..

hoping we will dodge the forecast 15-30cm of snow forecast for parts of the province the next couple of days; now looks like it may be farther south/west...


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 03/19/2011 - 21:35

Lori is way ahead of me too, here near Minneapolis, Minnesota.  No gardens' soil is showing yet, although there are spots of grass showing in the yard.  But the big melt is on here too, and the three bridges over the Minnesota River closest to me are expected to closed by mid to end of this coming week due to flooding!  Makes me feel very fortunate that I live on the same side of the river as where I work.  Many fellow employees will be driving an extra 20-25 miles each way to get to work.

Rivers' flooding is expected to be very bad here this spring.  The city of Grand Forks, MN on the Red River (flowing north) has stock piled 1.5 million filled sand bags.


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 03/19/2011 - 22:05

Oh, Rick, you are in one of those areas! I talk to lots of Manitoba folks in another forum, they are watching the rivers too....
Luckily, there is really nothing much around here that could flood--we get water standing in fields and roadsides, that's about it..even if the rivers in Rocky Mtn House or Red Deer did flood, it would be very local...


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 03/20/2011 - 03:10

Ryvarden lighthouse. It has been a beacon here for more than 1000 years. You are not allowed to drive but have to walk a few miles along the road. It is popular by all kind of people particularly in the summer.

View north and east across the open sea "Sletta" and the "Bømlafjorden" fjord. Here the weather and the sea can be very bad. You can see the snow covered mountains in the east.

 

it is mostly heather and grass growing here. No early springflowers! The kinnikinnick is very common here Lori ;)


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 03/20/2011 - 23:00

cohan wrote:

Oh, Rick, you are in one of those areas! I talk to lots of Manitoba folks in another forum, they are watching the rivers too....
Luckily, there is really nothing much around here that could flood--we get water standing in fields and roadsides, that's about it..even if the rivers in Rocky Mtn House or Red Deer did flood, it would be very local...

The Red River flowing from Minnesota and into Manitoba is especially prone to flooding because the drop in elevation per mile is so little.  It takes a long time for such flat areas to drain.  The Minnesota river is not as bad, but historically is a river with large natural fluctuations in volume.  It's really quite a spectacle to view the river at spring flooding from atop a river bluff, when you know what a "trickle" of water it becomes in late summer.

My little piece of land is at the top of the highest hill for  for miles around. (But you would never realize it just be looking at it.)


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 03/20/2011 - 23:23

I'll bet you're glad for that hill, Rick!

Beautiful sights, Trond.  It's nice to see blue water and blue sky.  Yes, kinnikinick is very common here too, though maybe not so common in people's yards.

Hope you did not get all the forecasted snow, Cohan.  We've only gotten a couple of centimeters so far here.


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 03/21/2011 - 00:03

Skulski wrote:

I'll bet you're glad for that hill, Rick!

My higher elevation really doesn't matter as I am 15 miles from the river: the last half of the Minnesota River (maybe 100 miles?), the river bottom is pretty much flanked by low bluffs, and that general elevation is then maintained throughout my area.  Many towns are situated in the river bottoms, however.


Submitted by cohan on Mon, 03/21/2011 - 02:41

Good to know you are not right in the flood path, Rick, that would be awful....

Lori, we got something like 3-4 inches last night through early this afternoon (sat night/sunday) not bad considering they were talking about 15-30 cm for some areas, and we weren't clear if we'd be in that zone or not! Still merited an hour and half or more of 2 man intensive shovelling..

Happily, they have removed snow from Monday's forecast, though its still there for Tues and Wed--looks like another big system, this one should be farther south, mostly, looks like Calgary might be right in the middle of that one?
Looked at the mounds of snow beside the driveway today, chest high in places and a few metres wide....


Submitted by Kelaidis on Tue, 03/22/2011 - 11:36

Spring is springing a bit too quickly: our star magnolia is nearly in full bloom at the gardens (pix in my camera still)...but I have a enough pix from the last week to share: sunny and bright every day. The skies have forgotten how to rain! Oh well...at least we have lots of snowpack so we can water to our heart's content for a while...

Snowdrops and Helleborus niger going over, as are the earlier crocuses. Lots of daffodils are out as are the first tulips. I love this time of year! Fritillaria raddeana is a new one for me: what a beauty! Looks a lot like F. imperialis, only a month earlier, and a cool chartreuse. I am curious to see how it will fare with our inevitable cold snaps we shall get for the next few months eventually! I am not positive about Crocus versicolor: it may be C. veluchensis: can anyone weigh in? I've missed several of the spring colchicums already: they are a variable lot.  I finally found a spot Trillium nivale seems to like: now I need to get some more! Aaah Spring...from here on out it's a roller coaster.


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 03/22/2011 - 16:08

Panayoti...Aahhh Spring indeed!  An awesome start to the season.  I'm fixated on your Fritillaria raddeana in its ethereal chartreusiness and brooding black tree-trunk-like stems :o :o :o :o  Nice going with Iris nicolai outside too!  As I'm writing this, had to dash outside to see if there's any sign of Trillium nivale in my garden, but the snow only just receded from the east-facing slope it is planted on, and no signs of life yet, the ground still frozen.


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 03/22/2011 - 16:27

Aside from crocus and other early spring bulbs on the sunny and warm south side of my house, there isn't much else brewing significantly just yet... the ground needs to warm up a bit, a couple cold days with some snow causing some delay.  As the snow recedes, I inspect the extent of tunneling and mice/mole/vole/shrew damage to the yard and garden areas.  Activity is greatest in the fall, and I generously "fed" the tunnels last fall, but still see remnants of activity.  All has been tromped down and raked over; any new signs of activity will be dealt with.

Where snow has melted away from troughs, there are signs of growth, a couple Draba ready to pop blooms.  I am struck by the winter foliage color on Globularia repens 'nana', a plant I bought from Harvey Wrightman, with micro-tiny leaves that are about as black as any black-leaved plant that I know of.  It gives me an idea, a planting of this Globularia, with the blazing orange wide-spread goblets of Crocus gargaricus piercing the flat mats of Globularia goodness.  Is this the same as G. nana (a valid name), or is it truly a microform of G. repens?
http://www.wrightmanalpines.com/details.asp?PRODUCT_ID=G072
PS: the labels in my troughs are scheduled to disappear, after I document maps of each trough. :)

I spied a seedling of Sedum rupestre 'Angelina' that seeded into the pure gravel of my deck stair landing, looking mighty coral red. :o


Submitted by Kelaidis on Tue, 03/22/2011 - 20:34

Wow! That sedum is mighty red: wonder if you have an even redder form (if it came from seed): it might be worth growing alongside typical Angelina to see if it is a redder form...

Iam posting a link: I'm starting to do a short TV segment on a local TV program. You can at least see what I look like in it@

http://www.kwgn.com/lifestyle/green/

I must have taken over 100 pictures today at the Gardens and at my home. Tomorrow I visit Sandy Snyder and her fabulous grass garden.


Submitted by Booker on Wed, 03/23/2011 - 00:34

McDonough wrote:

Panayoti... I'm fixated on your Fritillaria raddeana in its ethereal chartreusiness and brooding black tree-trunk-like stems

Reginald Farrer is alive and well and living in Massachusetts!!!  ;D    Beautifully descriptive phrase, Mark ... I didn't even need to look at the image!   :D

Panayoti ... your multifarious talents are wasted on such basic material  ... please convince the television company to reach out to a more educated and appreciative audience (i.e. the alpine fraternity).  :D


Submitted by Mark McD on Wed, 03/23/2011 - 10:39

Kelaidis wrote:

Don't worry, Cliff: I will be slipping lots of alpines into the mix!

alpine peas... astragalus and such ;D


Submitted by Mark McD on Wed, 03/23/2011 - 13:44

Things are slowly but surely plumping up and showing hints of lively color.  In a trough, Penstemon breviculus leaves remain evergreen all winter, typically with a winter burnish of red, but the color seems more pronounced now.  Buds on a misnamed Draba (of the D. hispanica type) await a warmer day to pop their first blooms.  The Penstemon in flower can be seen here: http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=300.0

Townsendia rothrockii buds are swelling with promise:


I've shown Crocus gargaricus with blooms wide open, but I do find the unopened golden dumplings visually amusing, popping straight out of the ground without leaves, anchored to the ground by whitish cataphyllls (basal bracts); not sure why but they conjure up an image of woman's lipstick and make me smile.


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 03/24/2011 - 20:13

Nothing but snow all week here, but here's a snippet from before the snow... hope to see some of the rock garden again sometime soon.  :rolleyes:

Dracocephalum palmatum, Androsace carnea and Aethionema glaucescens, as the glacier recedes...


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 03/25/2011 - 12:03

I can't say that I miss the snow anymore!
The snowdrops have flowered for a while but when I came home today after finishing work the sun still shone and I could picture the flowers open!

         

In the woodland Rhododendron moupinense has opened it's flowers too.

       


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 03/25/2011 - 21:41

I had six inches of wet snow a few days ago, and the Iris suaveolens is again covered.  But the sun is more intense now, and things are melting even though it hasn't gone above freezing.

Fargesia rufa popped out of the snow two weeks ago, and I am surprised how good it still looks.   Usually, as soon as it is exposed to the elements in late winter/early spring the foliage begins to dry.  I believe it is because the ground is already at or near the thaw point.  Most winters, our soils freeze at least 2-3ft deeper.

             

Thuja koraiensis (Korean Arborvitae) with last season's cones, and showing the white lower surface of its green foliage.

             

Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondai, the most cold hardy form, seems to be doing well here in zone 4a.  It is interesting to note that this one's foliage turns darker in winter, while Thuja koraiensis foliage turns slightly lighter.

             

A little rabbit damage on Lespedeza bicolor.  This is an area where the wind whips through, and blows a good portion of the snow away.  In the photo is a yardstick for comparison.  This is the first time anything has eaten the Lespedeza.  Usually the rabbits go after the shrubby willows (untouched this year!) and the Leitneria.  It took several years before that Lespedeza bicolor decided it wasn't going to be a herbaceous plant any more.  Mama is a 9ft.  shrubby tree in Chicago.

             


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 03/25/2011 - 21:55

I have to say, Lori, that your Dracocephalum looks way better than mine ever does after the snow melts.  Bravo!  (and very cute)

Trond, Rhododendron moupinense is one of the few rhododendron species that can do well here.  My place is too dry for any rhododendrons, and I am a terrible waterer during the summer to boot.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 03/26/2011 - 10:59

It's lovely to see such greenery and bloom, Maggi!  Among all the glorious sights in your photos, the size of the Eranthis is especially incredible!  (The poor little wretches only manage to get to about an inch and a half for me here.)

Rick, I'd love to see that Lespedeza again later on when it's in bloom.  It's curious that it can even take on tree form!  The Fargesia looks terrific.  So it's not usually so pristine-looking, come spring?  Sounds like it is usually mostly evergreen, if not completely, for you?


Submitted by IMYoung on Sat, 03/26/2011 - 13:00

Lori, I guess the Eranthis are about six or so inches high now... they always get much taller as the flowers fade.....making a really nice green patch for a while... before the next batch of plants get going.


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 03/26/2011 - 14:11

Maggi, your garden looks terrific!
Here the Eranthis are eaten before it reaches even a centimeter!

Rick, I had a Lespedeza but the summers are too cold so it never hardened off and froze each winter.


Submitted by IMYoung on Sat, 03/26/2011 - 14:36

Thank you, Trond. We are fortunate not to have rabbits, voles or deer in the garden. Only some mice and a million slugs, snails and caterpillars . :-\


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 03/26/2011 - 19:35

Maggi, you're hurting my eyes!  I'm not ready to see so much color yet!  (I can imagine the wonderful smells, though. Even just the smell of spring in the air would be welcome here.)

So you made me think harder, Lori, and that is not Lespedeza thunbergii in my previous post (oops!), it is L. bicolor.  I guess 16 years can catch up with me, as that was how long ago I collected the seed. ;D  And the parent shrubby tree was 9ft. I had it mixed up with another leguminous tree in the same area.  

So Lespedeza bicolor did died back to the ground for 4-5 years before it decided to survive the winter above the surface for me in zone 4.  Prior to that, I had grown them from seed for 3 years (the poor things), in pots woefully confining.  Most of them were donated to our Chapter plant sale. (I wonder whatever happened to them...)  But I kept a couple, and now just one since they take up a lot of room.  This is the only pic I could find of it in bloom.  The flowers aren't that photographic unless you get up close, but the plant has a very nice flowing-weepy look that I like.  The wood is not very strong, and I usually get a major branch or stem or two that breaks over the winter.  But the plant rebounds very quickly.  I collect seed from it every year if anyone wants some.

             

I did grow Lespedeza thunbergii 'Pink Fountains' for several years, until it got so big that it was taking up far more space than I had allotted for it.  This photo was take with a film camera, and the camera had an intermittent light leak, so it is what it is.  This pic was taken three years before the one above, and you can see the L. bicolor to the left and behind, and there is a Siberian white pine ([Pinus sibirica) to the right, that the Pink Fountains is smothering, that is somewhat evident in the prior photo also.  In its early years, Pink Fountain barely put on a show before the frost took it down for the winter.  But with each successive year, it bloomed a bit earlier in the season, and the bloom time was very satisfactory.

             


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 03/26/2011 - 19:59

The Fargesia rufa is pristine as soon as the snow that covers it melts, but like many broadleaf evergreens that are fine to the east or south of me, the more intense spring sun, drier air, and colder frozen soil in my climate degrades their beauty.  While it wants to be evergreen, by the time new growth starts, it doesn't look good without some major, judicious pruning.


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 03/27/2011 - 01:41

Both Lespedeza species look good, Rick. I remember the growth habit from my shrub before it succumbed.

And Rick, I would like some seed of Lespedeza bicolor please when possible :)
Should be proven hardy seemingly and I can try a plant at my summerhouse with warmer summers.


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 03/27/2011 - 08:52

Today I am manning the NARGS table at a Plant Society Day at one of our better known commercial nurseries.  It's a great way to catch up with or meet other people with like minds in other plant societies, as well as spread the good word about rock gardening.  

Normally, even this early, I can dig out some overwintering  plants for display from my potted collection outside.  With the late winter conditions as they are, that's not going to happen this year.  All I have that’s accessible and alive is a few things I overwinter inside the house that include Delosperma bosserianum and Corydalis wilsonii.  So, along with a sample of an empty styrofoam trough and various books and literature, I have decided to attract some more attention to my table: with a pussywillow bouquet.  After all, many small willows are alpine, and the bouquet will be a great segue into the introduction of same for onlookers.

As as another excuse to show, Mark had asked about Salix chaenomeloides

The arrangement has five different exotic species of willow.  All freshly cut today, so their development progression is documented, although in this first photo Salix chaenomeloides is a particularly young blooming sprig.  These are my estimates for this cold “spring” season's peak bloom times:

--- Salix chaenomeloides – now, although I have been cutting for enjoyment since early January.
--- Salix koriyangi ‘Rubikins’ – another week.
--- Salix gracilistylis var. melanostachys – in two weeks.
--- Salix cinerea ‘Variegata’ – in 3-4 weeks. (grown more for foliage.  The catkins aren't even as nice as our native pussywillow.)
--- Salix shraderiana – another 5-6 weeks.
             

And the bouquet.  The black pussywillow has a hard time here, as this is its northern limit for survival, and I only have a dry yard, and the shrub is progressively getting more shade as trees mature.  I never seem to get nice long filled sprigs of catkins that are so easy with other species.
               


Submitted by Howey on Mon, 03/28/2011 - 05:31

Haven't looked under the snow yet for my very tiny pussywillow  but am sure it is time to cut a few sprigs to bring indoors.  What do I see on my garden walk?  Well, for about the fifth time this March, the snow is starting to recede and reveal a few things - mainly a lot of devastation by rabbits and the elements.  Daphnes, which were forced into a prostrate attitude by the heavy snow, are snapping back upright.  Calycanthus floridus is now mostly broken twigs and suckers and, over near the west side of my back yard, a fledgling Daphne has been severely nibbled.  However, I picked up a few sprigs of the Calycanthus and the small Daphne and am "forcing" them inside and, lo and behold, they seem to have developed flower buds.  Have also seen healthy Cyclamen hederafolia leaves, lots of Winter Aconite, and a few Snowdrops.  Exciting sitings after such a long and cold winter.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b


Submitted by RickR on Mon, 03/28/2011 - 07:15

Howey wrote:

I picked up a few sprigs of the Calycanthus and the small Daphne and am "forcing" them inside and, lo and behold, they seem to have developed flower buds.   Fran

Wow, I never dreamed Calycanthus could be forced with those big, late spring flowers.  I think I'll go and cut some too, and we can compare notes down the road.  I am sure we are all interested in the results with your Daphne, too!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Mon, 03/28/2011 - 21:13

Spring must be really here.  One Hellebore is in bloom.  The flowers look sadly damaged in the morning by cold but by the afternoon they are beautiful.  Two days in a row of sun and blue sky.


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 03/29/2011 - 14:54

Anne, beautiful Xmas roses! Mine are somewhat damaged this cold dry winter.

Rick, I like those twigs! I remember when I was a kid and learnt to make flutes of the Salix stems when they got mouse-ears!

RickR wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Right on spot! Pinus parviflora. The other pine there to the right is an American species, P contorta. Between them is a Thuja, maybe T plicata.
When you say true cedars, do you mean Cedrus? -I grow three species: C deodara, libanotica and atlantica. They are  nice trees. You can get a glimpse of C atlantica 'Glauca' in the top left corner of the 3rd picture, the other green stuff in the left is Sciadopitus verticillata.

The broadleaf evergreen tree is not a tree but Hedera hibernica climbing in a common birch.

Yes, I was alluding to the Cedrus atlantica (which has had a name change, I believe).  I did guess the Pinus contorta, but I never would have thought that tree (below) was a Sciadopitys.  I would have thought it would have much longer pseudo-needles in your climate.   Unless, is it growing in clay based soil?

The Hedera hiberica is impressive, at least to me.  We are very lucky to even get Hedera helix (or closely related) to even survive on the ground, let alone climb.

Rick, I almost forgot to show you the Sciadopitys needles as I promised ;)

   

Btw here's another interesting conifer, Cunninghamia lanceolata:

   


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 03/29/2011 - 16:26

Thanks, Trond.  Very healthy Sciadopitys!

And I would have thought your winters would be too cold and wet for Cunninghamia.  Bravo!


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 03/30/2011 - 11:08

RickR wrote:

Thanks, Trond.  Very healthy Sciadopitys!

And I would have thought your winters would be too cold and wet for Cunninghamia.  Bravo!

:D In fact do Cunninghamia tolerate stable cold winters better than shifting wet ones!


Submitted by Reed on Thu, 03/31/2011 - 19:00

Here are some of the plants blooming in my yard right now.

Good stuff James! Plant names for the images added so that they are searchable - MMcD.
Chionodoxa forbesii
Corydallis solida
Erythronium japonicum
Fritillaria uva-vulpis
Jeffersonia dubia
Podophyllum delavayi
Anemone nemerosa
Omphalodes cappadocica ‘Starry Eyes’
Trillium "Volcano"


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 03/31/2011 - 22:50

It's wonderful to see all those gorgeous spring flowers!  It gives me hope that this winter might end.  :rolleyes:
Well, part of the tufa garden melted out today, and what do I see among the weatherbeaten leaves on a Thlaspi kurdicum grown from seed last year... flower buds!!
 
Whoo-hoo!


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 04/01/2011 - 08:47

Looking very good, Lori!
The snow is almost melted off my winter box of potted materials, and since the ground is relatively warm this spring, I will be uncovering it as soon as possible.  Can't wait to see if anything is happening under there.  Troughs are still under snow.

LOL, I was going to post the other day regarding silly plants that want to bloom when they are way too young.  I have an Anemone rivularis seedling inside with only two true leaves, and it was sending up what I thought were flower buds.  Come to find out that when the leaf is so tiny, each segment of the leaf is individually rolled up (and each looking like an individual bud)!  :-[

P.S. Our "Embarrassed" emoticon should be red in the face.


Submitted by Mark McD on Fri, 04/01/2011 - 11:08

Lori, let us see that Thlaspi when it is in full glorious flower.  

Two days ago it was sunny and mild, reaching 54 F (12 C), and the Crocus smiled.  A couple photos from left to right:
Crocus species, C. sieberi (two forms), C. malyi (first flowers popped open), C. angustifolius - lost of seedlings blooming

A couple rock plants, Alyssum oxycarpum (left) - neat leaf arrangement, Aethionema saxatile (right) - still in winter color.

Today, 6" of wet snow, compressed to about 3". :(


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 04/01/2011 - 17:54

Now that I have evened up the contest by planting both out on the southwest-facing slope, it seems a couple of Galanthus elwesii have beaten out the favourite, Bulbocodium vernum, for first bloom of the year.  

No sign yet of Bulbocodium.
Needless to say, neither is likely to stop traffic... though at least the Bulbocodium contrasts with the snow!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 04/01/2011 - 20:03

Beautiful plants, James.  Glad to know it's spring somewhere.  Went out and photographed this draba starting to bloom, planted in the face of the cliff.  It will look miuch better but the forecast was for snow so I took the picture just in case.


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 04/02/2011 - 00:28

James, you have a nice collection of plants in my taste! You are a couple weeks ahead of me though.

Lori, a good starter! You will soon catch up ;)

Anne, that Draba looks as it belongs there ;D As do this one from the wild in Turkey:

     

Mark, you as always have something flowering.


Submitted by Booker on Sat, 04/02/2011 - 00:29

Spiegel wrote:

Beautiful plants, James.  Glad to know it's spring somewhere.  Went out and photographed this draba starting to bloom, planted in the face of the cliff.  It will look miuch better but the forecast was for snow so I took the picture just in case.

There you are Anne ... all that prodding and delving, grubbing and probing, scraping and writhing, yanking and tearing has proved totally worthwhile when you can post beauties like that growing in your very own cliff!!!    :D


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 04/02/2011 - 11:41

Yesterday, after spending a few hours cutting off perennials, it was fun to have a closer look at the rock gardens to see the early signs of life...
Purple stem buds on Marmoritis (Phyllophyton) complanatum; Spiky, triangular leaves on Arenaria pestalozzae
 
I noticed a few tiny flower buds on Bolanthus/Gypsophila cherlerioides.  

Campanula topaliana, seraglio
 
Genista delphinensis, Vitaliana primuliflora

Buds emerging on Paeonia anomala:

And then today...  :P
 


Submitted by Weiser on Sat, 04/02/2011 - 12:49

:o How disheartening!! ??? Will it never stop. :-\
Sorry Lori. We are scheduled to get more snow tomorrow but not nearly so much.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sat, 04/02/2011 - 20:05

Lori, that's what we were expecting when I went out and photographed the draba.  We got a couple of inches and then it turned to rain and washed it away.  So spring is still on the way.  Noticed some townsendia buds deep in the plant, very cheering.  Also Oxytropis multiceps has started to "silver up", a very welcome sight.  Nothing  stops this plant from blooming in April.  Also see the tips of the leaves of Iris 'Katherine Hodgkins' breaking through.  Joe has promised to photograph the garden every day while I'm in Nottingham.  Still am amazed to be leaving the garden at this time, a first.


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 04/02/2011 - 20:12

Nice to see the flowers--still barely imaginable here--even Lori's beginnings are far beyond anything on my property--a few metres here and there of bare ground around spruce trees, but only native plants (not planted)  there, none of which are foolish enough to show any activity yet, no garden beds or pots at all exposed yet.. I think the first area to show may be a spot where I sunk a bunch of pots for winter in my infant veg patch in an old tiny corral--I got just a  bit of a glimpse of Taraxacum 'faroense' which was only planted (root piece) in late fall but seemed like it might be ok...
that's of course covered again now, and most planted areas still have a couple feet of snow on them before the new stuff fell--we got probably 10-15 cm (prob 10cm overnight, melting from late morning, but continued falling most of the day, maybe done now).. less than Lori, I heard Calgary had 20cm, and expecting another 25 overnight? hopefully not....


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 04/02/2011 - 20:14

Anne, it  must be hard to drag yourself away from your garden when everything is starting up... though on the other hand, it will be a wonderful event to attend too.  Your draba does look like a snapshot from nature - just what all rock gardeners must aspire to!
Our snow here is a little hard to take but realistically, we'll have a lot more snows before it's over.   :P  You know what I'm saying, Cohan!
I love seeing those Townsendia buds - so early yet ready to go! 


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 04/02/2011 - 21:20

Yes, Lori, this isn't at all late or unusually heavy for a spring snow here! What is a bit atypical is that usually we would have had some bare times in early december, and often starting in late feb, at least in march, but we still have solid snow cover almost everywhere, that has been in place since mid november! I'm looking forward to at least the sort of spring snow that you don't have to shovel as it will melt.. we shovelled today, and this stuff is heavy!  :P
I'm going to put a couple of pics in the weather thread...


Submitted by Weiser on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 00:34

Enough of this winter gloom.
Here are a few shots of spring to Cheer everone up. ;)

                        Ranunculus andersonii
                       

                        Ranunculus glaberrimus var. glaberrimus
                       

                        Ranunculus glaberrimus var. ellipticus
                       

                        Iris reticulata
                       

                        Hesperochiron californicus
                       

                        Fritillaria pudica
                       

                        Astragalus gilviflorus
                       

                        Astragalus purshii  var. lectulus
                       

                        Eriogonum douglasii var. meridionale (budding up)
                       

                        Physaria saximontana
                       


Submitted by Booker on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 00:44

Well, you have certainly cheered one old guy up on this side of the pond John with your images of much sought after buttercups in full flower!


Submitted by Weiser on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 00:58

Didn't realize I had this many in bloom here are the rest. :)

                         Allium parvum
                         

                         Arabis flaviflora (seedling first season bloom)
                         

                         Draba ? (lost the name to this one)
                         

                         Dutch hybrid crocus (No matter how common these are, they still thrill me)
               
                         

                         Viola beckwithii
                         


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 01:46

John, you certainly are cheering me up - but when I see your neat planting in gravel I am getting jealous too ;) Here such gravel beds are covered in moss and grass in no time due to the humid climate. Grass even germinate and grow on moss covered stones and it looks more like a lawn.

Cliff, how many different Ranunculi(?) do you have?


Submitted by Booker on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 02:01

Hoy wrote:

John, you certainly are cheering me up - but when I see your neat planting in gravel I am getting jealous too ;) Here such gravel beds are covered in moss and grass in no time due to the humid climate. Grass even germinate and grow on moss covered stones and it looks more like a lawn.

Cliff, how many different Ranunculi(?) do you have?

Hi Trond,
I don't have an extensive collection, I concentrate on high mountain buttercups and try to grow large flowering plants of the ones that seem more difficult in cultivation.  I am particularly interested in the New Zealand, North & South American and high European species having limited success with some and great frustration with others. 
My growing conditions sound very similar to yours with moss and liverworts encroaching into every pot, trough and raised bed.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 09:41

Thanks for the pictures, John.  It definitely must have lifted the gloom for those of us either waiting for spring or trying to fool the antlered rats into thinking garden plants are not edible (barbed wire, chicken wire, netting, etc.).  Loved the astragalus pictures, especially that beauty, Astragalus gilviflorus, very difficult for me to keep here in the northeast - seems to be extremely sensitive to winter wet.  The flowers are so large in proportion to the plant.


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 11:48

Booker wrote:

Hoy wrote:

John, you certainly are cheering me up - but when I see your neat planting in gravel I am getting jealous too ;) Here such gravel beds are covered in moss and grass in no time due to the humid climate. Grass even germinate and grow on moss covered stones and it looks more like a lawn.

Cliff, how many different Ranunculi(?) do you have?

Hi Trond,
I don't have an extensive collection, I concentrate on high mountain buttercups and try to grow large flowering plants of the ones that seem more difficult in cultivation.  I am particularly interested in the New Zealand, North & South American and high European species having limited success with some and great frustration with others. 
My growing conditions sound very similar to yours with moss and liverworts encroaching into every pot, trough and raised bed.

Cliff, your plant taste seems to be a real challenge!


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 11:54

Today I planted out a dozen of Fuchsia magellanica seedlings and some other woodlanders :)

I also found a lot of Corydalis starting blooming

           

- and Rhododendron sutchuense is soon ready:

   


Submitted by Mark McD on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 12:10

Weiser wrote:

Enough of this winter gloom.
Here are a few shots of spring to Cheer everone up.

Great stuff John!  Fun to see photos of the two forms of Ranunculus glaberrimus virtually side-by-side, I had not seed var. ellipticus before.  The bright bud color on the Eriogonum buds, and promising yellow buds on Physaria saximontana are cheerful indeed.

But it is Allium parvum that I am so happy to see here, one that I've had seed of a number of times but not yet raised to flowering size.  These near stemless Western American Allium can be as concise and desirable as many of the Central Asian species.  

Superb Viola trinervata!  I see buds on my Fritillaria pudica, and lots of 1-3 year seedlings from sowing in-place seed.


Submitted by Weiser on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 17:53

Thank you everyone I aim to please.

Quote:

Superb Viola trinervata! 

Mark you got the flower color right but on the wrong species.  ;) :D


Submitted by Mark McD on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 18:01

Weiser wrote:

Thank you everyone I aim to please.

Quote:

Superb Viola trinervata! 

Mark you got the flower color right but on the wrong species.  ;) :D

Dang, double dang, I'm being careless, it is V. beckwithii.  When I think of "sagebrush violets" both come to mind :P


Submitted by Booker on Sun, 04/03/2011 - 23:24

Hoy wrote:

Booker wrote:

Hoy wrote:

John, you certainly are cheering me up - but when I see your neat planting in gravel I am getting jealous too ;) Here such gravel beds are covered in moss and grass in no time due to the humid climate. Grass even germinate and grow on moss covered stones and it looks more like a lawn.

Cliff, how many different Ranunculi(?) do you have?

Hi Trond,
I don't have an extensive collection, I concentrate on high mountain buttercups and try to grow large flowering plants of the ones that seem more difficult in cultivation.  I am particularly interested in the New Zealand, North & South American and high European species having limited success with some and great frustration with others.  
My growing conditions sound very similar to yours with moss and liverworts encroaching into every pot, trough and raised bed.

Cliff, your plant taste seems to be a real challenge!

But worth it when the occasional success occurs!  LOL

Ranunculus seguieri - winner of my two Farrer Medals in 2001 and 2003.
Please note : This image was taken two or three days after one of the shows and the stems had elongated due to exposure to the heat and poor light in the show venue.  The plant looked a lot better on the day!  :D


Submitted by Weiser on Mon, 04/04/2011 - 01:37

Even when you say it is not in ideal shape , there is no need to apologize for such a lovely plant.
It is a beauty! :D


Submitted by Kelaidis on Tue, 04/12/2011 - 12:52

Wish WE could grow those high alpine, tiny white ranunculus....too hot in Denver! But we do grow some other goodies. Just as everywhere else in the Northern Hemisphere, things are coming hard and fast. I am appending a few things that are blooming right now I just photographed, mostly from the front of the alphabet...don'tcha love the Spring! You can probably deduce I'm in my Fritillaria phase...


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 04/12/2011 - 14:12

Kelaidis, I am not sure that I pity your lack of possibility to grow high alpine Ranunculus species! You grow numerous other enviable goodies ;D


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 04/12/2011 - 21:18

Terrific plants, Trond and Cliff and Panayoti!
The (pathetic) state of things here, by comparison... it's not spectacular (or even in focus  ;D) but it's in bloom!
Alyssum wulfenianum:


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 04/12/2011 - 23:45

And yet, Lori-- far ahead of me :) See-- there is a good reason for me to be on this forum-no matter how cold or inactive anyone's garden may be, it will always be colder and more desolate here (until we get some members from someplace with an even shorter season-ha!.....)


Submitted by Kelaidis on Wed, 04/13/2011 - 05:40

I don't feel sorry for those of you with shorter growing seasons: this summer when we are baking and our rock gardens are parboiled and dreary, your's will be brimming with color! We have to revel in our incredible springs and falls (which are often punctuated by disastrous hailstorms, severe frosts or snowstorms--this year is uncannily wonderful). In fact this is the FOURTH miraculously wonderful spring in a row. I am thinking I might want to move elsewhere: Colorado Front Range does not usually have these interminable, sunny, cool springs where things bloom forever and ever. There are still hellebores and even crocuses and snowdrops blooming in the cooler corners where the snow lingered, but the full panoply of spring glory is rampaging in sunnier spots and lasting forever: I am posting a smattering of other recent highlights below, but those of you who are suckers for punishment can slog through a gallery of almost 100 pictures I posted on Fotki:

                                                                      http://public.fotki.com/Panayoti/denver-march-2010/


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 04/13/2011 - 06:39

cohan wrote:

no matter how cold or inactive anyone's garden may be, it will always be colder and more desolate here (until we get some members from someplace with an even shorter season-ha!.....)

Yeah, you said it!!  Between our gardens and the late bloom in the mountains, it must look like perpetual spring here!  ;D

Before I immerse myself in Panayoti's album (drool!), here are few things that were popping up yesterday:
Corydalis nobilis, Paeonia mlokosewitschii.... a couple of crocus and a few puschkinia showing buds...


Submitted by Weiser on Wed, 04/13/2011 - 07:14

Kelaidis wrote:

, but those of you who are suckers for punishment can slog through a gallery of almost 100 pictures I posted on Fotki:

PK
I didn't slog through that gallery of fine plants at all. I skipped through, lingering here, and there to admire. All the while longing for the day I can boast of growing such jewels.
Your garden, as always is impressive.


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 04/13/2011 - 12:51

Very true, Panayotis--no midsummer lull here--mid-summer is the whole season  ;D My sempervivum, for example, have good colour all year--or rather the half of it they are not covered with snow ;) Our snowcover is about to reach the 5 month point--longer than usual without interruption, since it stayed from mid-Nov, usually it comes and goes into December...
Now I have to go out and gather some firewood--after some nice 'warm' days up to and above 10C/50F, we are back to just barely above freezing, with snow in 4 of the next 7 days forecast.. so far we are predicted less than either south or north, we'll see if that holds-- I think Lori's area already has snowfall warnings?

Some small parts of my future rock garden (pots sunk for winter in mounds of soil from digging) are out of the snow now... for now...


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 04/13/2011 - 13:27

Lori, I like your little Alyssum wulfenianum but I assume it will grow bigger?

Here are two plants I pictured today when I did some tidying up!

Scilla rosenii. This year they are contemporary with S bifolia and siberica.

   

Saxifraga juniperifolia (I believe??)  I suddenly discovered thisone that I had completely forgotten growing on a concrete slab.


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 04/13/2011 - 16:06

Hoy wrote:

Lori, I like your little Alyssum wulfenianum but I assume it will grow bigger?

Here are two plants I pictured today when I did some tidying up!

Scilla rosenii. This year they are contemporary with S bifolia and siberica.

Saxifraga juniperifolia (I believe??)  I suddenly discovered this one that I had completely forgotten growing on a concrete slab.

Nice patch of Scilla! the Sax planted itself on concret? or you put it there?


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 04/13/2011 - 19:05

Hoy wrote:

Lori, I like your little Alyssum wulfenianum but I assume it will grow bigger?

Trond, those are flower rosettes forming on the ends of the stems of an adult plant - they are evergreen; it's a relatively short-lived, self-seeding perennial, and not particularly small (at least not in regular soil) - the plants get to about a foot across and about 6" high.  It is notable here for how early and late it blooms and for repeat bloom through the season.  
Here are some better photos of Alyssum wulfenianum:
   

Nice Scilla!


Submitted by Mark McD on Wed, 04/13/2011 - 19:35

Hoy wrote:

Here are two plants I pictured today when I did some tidying up!

Scilla rosenii. This year they are contemporary with S bifolia and siberica.

Very pretty, love the ice blue color, but I'm wondering if this really isn't Scilla rosenii; maybe a different Scilla species or Puschkinia scilloides (...or var. libanotica).

Scilla rosenii
http://www.augisbulbs.com/catalog.php?c=64  (scroll down)
http://www.srgc.org.uk/bulblog/log2006/260406/log.html  (scroll down)
http://homepage3.nifty.com/alm/gallery_lili6.htm
http://www.sciencephoto.com/images/download_lo_res.html?id=670084620


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 04/13/2011 - 19:41

Assuming this really is what the seed was claimed to be, Limonium perplexum is remarkable hardy for a coastal Mediterranean species.  (It is also apparently critically endangered in its very limited native range in Spain.)
Here it is after coming through the winter and a spring snowstorm... (it's nothing to write home about, particularly... just surprisingly hardy.  ;))   

It was ready to bloom in fall last year, in its first year from seed, but frost killed the flowers before they could open - a typical-looking Limonium flower spike.

http://translate.google.ca/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://bdb.cma.gva.es...
http://outdoors.webshots.com/photo/2072327730047134247GLrfmj


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 04/13/2011 - 20:42

McDonough wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Here are two plants I pictured today when I did some tidying up!

Scilla rosenii. This year they are contemporary with S bifolia and siberica.

Very pretty, love the ice blue color, but I'm wondering if this really isn't Scilla rosenii; maybe a different Scilla species or Puschkinia scilloides (...or var. libanotica).

Very pretty, whatever they are!!  A close-up photo directly into a flower may help to firm up the ID... from what I can make out on the flower detail photo, I don't think I see the fused ring of stamens that (I think) distinguishes Puschkinia and Chionodoxa from Scilla... is that (still) a valid distinction?  I know the taxonomists have been messing around with these genera.

Puschkinia libanotica, below - note fused stamen ring:

That's a photo from a week ago last year... which was also a late spring, but this year is really late!


Submitted by AmyO on Thu, 04/14/2011 - 05:56

These were under snow just two days ago! The past couple of days the snow melted away very fast and now some roads are flooded.


Submitted by cohan on Thu, 04/14/2011 - 12:23

I love retic Irises in general , and that's a lovely colour,Amy; I'll need to watch for some :)
I'm jealous of the coum, since I don't think its possible here...


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 04/14/2011 - 14:09

Weiser wrote:

Hoy
Love the Scilla. What a lovely colony! :)

Thanks John. It has increased well the last two years but not by seeding.

cohan wrote:

Nice patch of Scilla! the Sax planted itself on concrete? or you put it there?

Cohan,
I planted the Sax nearby in a hollow concrete slab - it is a bigger plant a foot away but without flowers! It has somehow spread to the rim of the slab.

Skulski wrote:

McDonough wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Here are two plants I pictured today when I did some tidying up!

Scilla rosenii. This year they are contemporary with S bifolia and siberica.

Very pretty, love the ice blue color, but I'm wondering if this really isn't Scilla rosenii; maybe a different Scilla species or Puschkinia scilloides (...or var. libanotica).

Very pretty, whatever they are!!  A close-up photo directly into a flower may help to firm up the ID... from what I can make out on the flower detail photo, I don't think I see the fused ring of stamens that (I think) distinguishes Puschkinia and Chionodoxa from Scilla... is that (still) a valid distinction?  I know the taxonomists have been messing around with these genera.

I do believe I planted these as S rosenii but I won't swear. I have Puschkinia and Chionodoxa too and those are different as Lori's pictures show.
Here is a close-up:


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 04/14/2011 - 14:13

Skulski wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Lori, I like your little Alyssum wulfenianum but I assume it will grow bigger?

Trond, those are flower rosettes forming on the ends of the stems of an adult plant - they are evergreen; it's a relatively short-lived, self-seeding perennial, and not particularly small (at least not in regular soil) - the plants get to about a foot across and about 6" high.  It is notable here for how early and late it blooms and for repeat bloom through the season.  

Thanks, Lori. I didn't know this Alyssum species. Your first picture showed something I thought would be 5cm!


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 04/14/2011 - 18:56

Alyssum wulfenianum, is known as the easiest true alyssum to grow here. 

But that sure doesn't take away from its beauty!


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 04/14/2011 - 21:47

AmyO wrote:

These were under snow just two days ago!

Very pretty, Amy!  Ahhh, that's what we wait all winter for!!


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 04/16/2011 - 00:35

A few shots from 3 days ago, before the fresh snow turned everything white again, showing the extent of our melt, so far..
The bare areas are either along paths which we shovelled all winter, or along spruce trees which keep the snow more shallow.. next to some of these bare spots, the snow was still knee deep, with another 15-20cm now on top....
The 'rock garden' views show the area where I have excavated my old overgrown rock garden from my teenage years which was untended most of the 25+ years I was away, soil was mounded and pots sunk for the winter, rocks piled around awaiting more work this year...


Submitted by WimB on Sun, 04/17/2011 - 12:11

Some plants which caught my eyes in the garden during the last week:

Haberlea rhodopensis 'Virginalis'
Taraxacum pseudoroseum
Viola cucullaria 'Red Giant'


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/17/2011 - 16:24

Hoy wrote:

Any plants surviving the 25 years you didn't tend them, Cohan?

not much--the whole thing became part of the natural environment here with native plants and shrubs...lol, plus some Irises and daylilies from a neighbouring bed spread over a large area...
One willow- a mid sized, about metre, metre and a half tall.. just a couple of stems; a Zigadenus elegans, which was not flowering over the years (that my mother noticed, anyway), but has since I have weeded around it; a couple of tiny plants of what I think are a Heuchera sp from B.C., and a couple of things from presumably dormant seed popped up in a cleared area-- a pale flowered Potentilla (also from B.C.--arguta?) and Androsace septentrionale... no traces of semps, opuntias etc...lol


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 04/17/2011 - 19:58

Wim, I didn't realize Taraxacum pseudoroseum was so "bicolored". A very nice feature.  I have Taraxacum pamiricum seed that I will be sowing shortly, but now I'd rather have pseudoroseum.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 04/17/2011 - 20:38

WimB wrote:

Some plants which caught my eyes in the garden during the last week:
Haberlea rhodopensis 'Virginalis'
Taraxacum pseudoroseum
Viola cucullaria 'Red Giant'

Beauties, Wim!  

RickR wrote:

Wim, I didn't realize Taraxacum pseudoroseum was so "bicolored". A very nice feature.  I have Taraxacum pamiricum seed that I will be sowing shortly, but now I'd rather have pseudoroseum.

Rick, I grew T. pseudoroseum from seed last year and the plants bloomed by the end of June, but I never got to see the darn things fully open!   :(  From my photos of half-closed flowers, it looks like they are bicolored... I hope they will be as showy as Wim's this year!  
T. pamiricum looks nice, and with that foliage, you won't have to defend it from any visiting gardeners who might forget themselves and start weeding:
http://www.google.ca/images?client=safari&rls=en&q=Taraxacum%20pamiricum...
(Hmmm, this sudden - at least on my part -reverence for dandelions is a bit odd and ironic!  ;))


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/17/2011 - 21:30

I also wanted to comment on your pretty weeds, Wim  ;D

Lori, I doubt anyone's appreciation of dandelions could be odder than mine-- every photo of yard and garden I edit has at least one dandelion leaf showing, and much of the time photos taken in the bush show them as well.... I wouldn't even consider eliminating T officinale as being possible!

I also sowed T pseudoroseum last year, from Wim's seed!, but later in the summer. Nice little plants by summer's end, hope they made it through the winter.. also sowed sowed albidum with no results :( think I have a few seeds left...
Rick, pamiricum is one I remember coming across pics of--white flowers and entire leaves, I believe? haven't looked at Lori's link yet--the entire leaves and non-yellow flowers are the best features for making them non-weedy looking!


Submitted by cohan on Mon, 04/18/2011 - 11:46

Love this one!
Speaking of T pamiricum, I think I remember it being from a warmer place? Will be interesting to see how it does for Rick...


Submitted by Barstow on Mon, 04/18/2011 - 12:44

WimB wrote:

While were busy talking weeds; here's a picture of Taraxacum albidum.

Nice, Wim! Hoping mine will flower for the first time this year!

I tell visitors to my garden to watch out for the roadside verges gradually changing colour from yellow to a mix of yellows, whites and pinks in 10 years from now  :) Nice with a bit of diversity...


Submitted by cohan on Mon, 04/18/2011 - 12:52

Stephenb wrote:

WimB wrote:

While were busy talking weeds; here's a picture of Taraxacum albidum.

Nice, Wim! Hoping mine will flower for the first time this year!

I tell visitors to my garden to watch out for the roadside verges gradually changing colour from yellow to a mix of yellows, whites and pinks in 10 years from now  :) Nice with a bit of diversity...

That's what I think would be nice, too! I wonder though, if the new weeds would just squeeze out more natives and not the existing weeds...lol


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 04/18/2011 - 13:50

I had Taraxacum pseudoroseum for two years but it flowered itself to death last year - would never stop producing flowers and died :(


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 04/18/2011 - 13:57

Btw, here is what I saw today on my "garden walk". We had a heavy job finding snow patches with rotten snow  to get a 12km skiing! Even the highest point in this area (1250m/4100ft) is almost bereft of snow.


Submitted by Kelaidis on Mon, 04/18/2011 - 22:29

Spring is galloping away in Colorado: lots in bloom!

Anemone blanda
Daphne
x hendersonii 'Aymon Correvon' etc.
Ebracteola wilmanniae
Iris attica
Iris humilis
Iris scariosa
Lesquerella
ex Penrose
Narcissus scaberulus
Pediocactus simpsonii
ex Irish Canyon


Submitted by Kelaidis on Mon, 04/18/2011 - 22:32

And MORE!

Phlox albomarginata
Quince
Ribes x gordonianum
Scilla hohenakeri
Thlaspi lilacina
Tulipa linifolia
Tulipa
sp. chrysantha dwf.
Veronica bombycina v. bolgardaghensis
Veronica pseudocinerea


Submitted by cohan on Mon, 04/18/2011 - 23:16

Hoy wrote:

Btw, here is what I saw today on my "garden walk". We had a heavy job finding snow patches with rotten snow  to get a 12km skiing! Even the highest point in this area (1250m/4100ft) is almost bereft of snow.

I am so sad that you are lacking snow.....lol--if I could send some I would!


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 04/19/2011 - 11:09

I see color is everywhere there, Panayoti!  I especially like ... them all!

I wonder if what I have been growing as Iris humilis is indeed that.  I grew it from seed from the NARGS seed ex.  Listed as Iris humilis ex Siberia, the donor was a Stephen Bertrand, Ionia, IA.

Here it is:


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 04/20/2011 - 15:08

Can't help you with the iris, Rick! But it is worth growing!

Not much flowering here in the mountains yet except mogop (Pulsatilla vernalis) but here are some: (takes time to upload the pics)

Thlaspi alpestre

Salix lanata

Primula scandinavica - not yet in flower

And one for Lori - do you recognise it? -can I expect flower this summer?


Submitted by Kelaidis on Thu, 04/21/2011 - 11:19

John asked for them: here are the latest slug of pix, mostly from Denver Botanic Gardens, which is looking pretty spiffy right now if I don't say so! I think most are self explanatory (pix are labeled). Gentle rain last night, cool sunny days: I can barely stand it! The fruit trees have been blooming for weeks and weeks (even the cherries): the fourth perfect spring in a row. I shall have to move away for sure soon. The Phlox in the trough below is Phlox condensata, our high alpine with heavenly scented bloom that usually does not bloom until late June on the hills (two months later!): great to get a preview of the alpine spring...

I did a short essay on Iris bucharica you might enjoy on my blog: http://prairiebreak.blogspot.com/2011/04/iris-bucharica-treasure-from-bokhara.html

The plicata iris is Iris lactea form Mongolia with Phlox bifida 'Betty Blake'


Submitted by cohan on Thu, 04/21/2011 - 16:17

Hoy wrote:

Yes, Lori's seed!

Here's the flowers of Thlaspi alpestre. Not very showy but welcome in early spring.

I think its cute, especially with purple leaves, which I guess is just in spring while its cool? Growing Thlaspis has for me a similar feeling of naughtiness to growing Taraxacums--a common garden and field weed here is Thlaspi arvensis from Europe...


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 04/22/2011 - 00:00

cohan wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Yes, Lori's seed!

Here's the flowers of Thlaspi alpestre. Not very showy but welcome in early spring.

I think its cute, especially with purple leaves, which I guess is just in spring while its cool? Growing Thlaspis has for me a similar feeling of naughtiness to growing Taraxacums--a common garden and field weed here is Thlaspi arvensis from Europe...

The purple leaves are due to the bright sunshine and leaves not accustomed to it after months covered in snow - and cold nights.

I know Thlaspi arvense! When my uncle and I had our vegetable plot (many years ago) this was one of the weeds ;)


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 04/22/2011 - 00:51

Many plants here, esp in spring, have some red or purple in the new leaves; somewhere long ago I read something about these pigments helping to draw heat, but I don't remember any details... Of course many plants in other circumstances produce red pigments in response to all sorts of stress..


Submitted by Weiser on Fri, 04/22/2011 - 07:55

Kelaidis wrote:

John asked for them: here are the latest slug of pix, mostly from Denver Botanic Gardens, which is looking pretty spiffy right now if I don't say so!

Pk
I'll be sure and ask more often if the results of my quires are always so pleasant!
Thank you for such a prompt responce! ;)
[size=14pt]Very Nice


Submitted by Barstow on Sun, 04/24/2011 - 04:12

The first day with temperatures above 15C and spring is here:
1) Hepatica nobilis grows wild in my garden and is actually a weed in one of my beds!! However, it has declined in other parts of the garden (possibly due to a dramatic decrease in a species of ant)
2) Petasites palmatus (thanks to Cohan)
3) Tussilago - often taken for granted, but it has its beauty...
4) Crocus sieberi "Firefly"
5) Thlaspi alpestre - a weed that's not discouraged in one of my beds!


Submitted by Kelaidis on Sun, 04/24/2011 - 08:56

Stephen: I wish Hepatica were weeds for us! We grow quite a few (mostly pale lavender and pink or white): nothing gorgeous like yours! And I had no idea Petasites were so showy! We have P. japonicus at the Gardens which is not very showy, and P. frigidus in our mountains, which I believe is more green flowered. Love it!

Here are the latest--mostly from Denver Botanic Gardens which is having a banner year (very cool days and very light frost if any at night for many weeks, so plants are blooming forever! Just like Europe...) Usually we alternate arctic blasts with tropical heat and everything is seared and goes over right away. One could get spoiled.

I've been posting all these for John Weiser, who started this thread: I demand pix from him!

Clematis fremontii
Anemone ranunculoides
Caltha palustris
Erigeron pinnatisectus
Erodium absinthoides
Fritillaria pallidiflora
Phlox grayi
Primula auricula
Sanguinaria canadensis
'Multiplex'
Vitaliana primuliflora


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/24/2011 - 19:54

Stephenb wrote:

The first day with temperatures above 15C and spring is here:
1) Hepatica nobilis grows wild in my garden and is actually a weed in one of my beds!! However, it has declined in other parts of the garden (possibly due to a dramatic decrease in a species of ant)
2) Petasites palmatus (thanks to Cohan)
3) Tussilago - often taken for granted, but it has its beauty...
4) Crocus sieberi "Firefly"
5) Thlaspi alpestre - a weed that's not discouraged in one of my beds!

Great stuff, Stephen! That Hepatica colour is wonderful! Glad the Petasites is flowering for you, they should be coming along in a few weeks here!
I like the Thlaspi too, as when Trond showed it..


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 04/24/2011 - 19:55

AmyO wrote:

At long last color in the gardens here! It does my heart good.

Congrats on all the colour, Amy! Is that Hepatica form native in your area? love them :)


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 04/25/2011 - 00:47

Many desirable plants here!

PK, even if you wish for "weedy" Hepaticas, you seem to have more plants to care for than any ;)

Amy, I like the yellow Hellebore! Have tried to sow yellows and the first one flower now but the color doesn't match yours!


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 04/25/2011 - 11:11

Back home!
The birches, rowans and other trees, and a lot of shrubs have leafed out while we were on Easter Vaccation. Actually it was all green along the road when we came down from the mountains.

Here is one that immediately caught my eyes when we came  home yesterday evening, Glaucidium palmatum.


Submitted by AmyO on Mon, 04/25/2011 - 18:43

The Hepatica is native here! Just a short walk from here there is a huge swath of them all in various shades of blue & pink. I'll post some pics of them soon.
The yellow Hellebore is flowering for the first time this year.....it was an unnamed seedling..a lucky plant pick!


Submitted by Barstow on Tue, 04/26/2011 - 01:15

Trond: a magnificent Glaucidium - as good if not better than the plants I saw in the far north of Norway (Troms and Vesteraalen) a couple of years ago (including white flowered)!


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 04/26/2011 - 12:26

Skulski wrote:

After a long wait, there are finally some crocus in bloom here! 

Good show, Lori! Nice range of colours...
I was moving snow from my one ill-placed bed with spring bulbs, and there are some shoots ready to go! (and a lot of water on one side, and an acre of snow still to melt beside it...lol).. I'm gradually figuring out how things work on this piece of land-- I paid attention to sun exposure right off the bat, but didn't think about snow melt times (varying by many weeks!), drainage patterns, wet (low) and dry (high) ends of the property!


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 04/26/2011 - 13:35

Stephenb wrote:

Trond: a magnificent Glaucidium - as good if not better than the plants I saw in the far north of Norway (Troms and Vesteraalen) a couple of years ago (including white flowered)!

Thank you Stephen ;D I had to struggle with molluscs some years to the plant got big enough to tolerate some slug attack! I haven't been that lucky with the white I have tried. Slugs devour the young growth.

Lori, nice to see some flowers from you!

Cohan, do you have a dominant direction from where the wind blows? At our mountain cabin the wind often is north-westerly and make huge heaps of snow on the leeward side of the house where we have our table and chairs. I often have to remove huge amounts of snow there before we can enjoy the sun. Not this year though, the snow seemingly evaporated in no time :o


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 04/26/2011 - 16:35

Not a very established plant yet (and unnamed), but one I received from Betty Ann Addison, owner of Rice Creek Gardens here in Minnesota.  My other C. solida are rather blah pink/reds yet still nice, but I like this one especially.  It seems to have a distinctly flattish apron of foliage.  The variegated grass in the upper left is Arrhenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum 'Variegatum'.   Quite a mouthful, and not invasive at all here, despite is "bulbous" habit.

Corydalis solida


Submitted by Barstow on Wed, 04/27/2011 - 06:52

RickR wrote:

The variegated grass in the upper left is Arrhenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum 'Variegatum'.   Quite a mouthful, and not invasive at all here, despite is "bulbous" habit.

Re- Arrhenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum  - a common find at prehistoric sites in Europe, the edible tubers were no doubt gathered for food, although very fiddly! I did have this but I think I've lost it...

...oh, and nice pictures all...


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 04/27/2011 - 17:43

Nice Cory, Rick! I was looking at the bed my only clone so far is in, and one end is starting to come out of the snow, the end with the C solida is still a foot or more under..  moved some snow from beside the bed to speed things along ...
Trond, my one real plus on this property (naturally directly related to the minuses ;) is that there is not a lot of wind in here, since we have trees on 4 sides, with the only real gap being the driveway (and there are trees and an old house which block some of that wind from the rest of the property..)-- which is southeast: the source of some nasty weather systems, but not the most common..  So, wind is a factor, but not the major one..or rather it probably is, but in some complicated interaction with trees I have not totally figured out..


Submitted by RickR on Wed, 04/27/2011 - 18:57

Stephenb wrote:

Re- Arrhenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum  - a common find at prehistoric sites in Europe, the edible tubers were no doubt gathered for food, although very fiddly! I did have this but I think I've lost it...

I never knew the tubers are edible, thanks Stephen!  How are they prepared?  I love trying new thing like this, even if it might only be once.  (Also enjoyed your comment regarding Dentaria/Cardamine.)  I've never tried growing the grass from seed, but I do get seed heads, if you would like some seed.


Submitted by Barstow on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 02:26

Off-hand I don't know how they were prepared - a tradition that doesn't seem to have survived to modern times. I also haven't eaten them myself yet, so I can't tell you that I survived the experience (so, careful and don't overdo it the first time :) ).

Yes, I'd love to try some seed, thank you - as I noted mine seems to be quite dead...


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 07:34

Stephenb wrote:

I also haven't eaten them myself yet, so I can't tell you that I survived the experience (so, careful and don't overdo it the first time :) ).

Yes, I'd love to try some seed, thank you - as I noted mine seems to be quite dead...

I'm not the adventurous sort when it comes to wild edibles.  I want solid evidence, so I won't be the guinea pig.  I've grown Coryphantha vivipara for 15 years and known of its supposed edibility for at least that long, but I will be tasting the berries for the first time this year.

Regarding seed of Arrhenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum, if memory serves, it was mid summer.  I'll email you then, too.


Submitted by cohan on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 12:00

How tall is this grass, Rick? google images didn't help much with scale.. interestingly, among the first few pics were some of charred remains from ancient sites! So based just on that quick glance, I'd say roasted!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 13:01

Spring seems to have arrived here.  It's a good year for Magnolia soulangeana.  Frequently the buds or flowers get blasted by frost - nothing worse looking than a tree with blackened buds and black petals hanging down.  This year it's lovely.  The early plants in the crevice garden are starting too.  The Petrocallis pyrenaica is blooming in a natural crevice, the phlox in a man (woman)-made one.


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 15:19

Beautiful plants, Anne!

I have planted a Magnolia soulangeana at my summerhouse and my sister reported it was in full flower now - but I have no time to go and look :(


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 21:27

Gee Ann, I'm still waiting for my Cornus mas (Cornelian Cherry) to bloom here.  Seems you posted yours "ages" ago....

Wow, I have never seen a Magnolia soulangeana bloom like that!  When I first saw the thumbnail, being so floriferous I just assumed it was a crabapple!

Especially like the Petrocallis, too.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 04/29/2011 - 05:21

Rick, it was a really good year for the magnolia.  Some years there are no flowers because of heavy frosts.  It's worth it to have a year like this.  The petrocallis really seems to respond to crevice planting.


Submitted by Mark McD on Sat, 04/30/2011 - 22:25

RickR wrote:

Wow, I have never seen a Magnolia soulangeana bloom like that!  When I first saw the thumbnail, being so floriferous I just assumed it was a crabapple!

Rick, Magnolia soulangeana is almost a prerequisite tree here in Massachusetts, along with Rhododedron 'PJM' and Forsythia bushes.  I don't grow any Forsythia, I don't need to, they're *everywhere* here.  So, back to Magnolia soulangeana, they typically bloom here with unbelievable profusion similar to Anne's photo, and they are found in just about every other yard, some are old, huge, and spectacular.  They are however subject to the "surprise" late freeze that will blast the flowers in 1 out of every 3 years.  This year they are breathtaking... no surprise frost.

This spring Magnolias have been fantastic overall... I think the long slow season is their salvation.  Here are some shots taken recently, of Magnolia stellata - pink form (got this at a NARGS seedling sale for $1, hard to beat that price ;D), and M. denudata 'Forrest Pink', thought to actually be a hybrid with M. denudata rather than a selected form.  In 2008, my tree of 'Forrest Pink' was smashed to bits in the December 2008 ice storm.  I drastically cut it way back to stubby stumps for branches, and 3 years later it is looking super fine indeed.  Unlike M. soulangeana, this one almost never gets hit by late frosts.  Also, the flowers are more striking, huge floppy affairs, intense rose on the outside, palest pink-white inside, and exuding a heavenly sweet fragrance that perfumes the entire garden.  The pink-flowered M. stellata is also heavily perfumed, but spicy and intoxicating.  Below these tap-rooted trees, grow all sorts of spring ephemerals such as Trillium species.


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 05/01/2011 - 01:35

It is no doubt. Magnolias tolerate and maybe prefere cold winters but they do best where the summers are really hot! (At least hotter than here)

Mark, do you get seeds of your stellata pink form? Stellata is good here and I have one in my garden (very floriferous this spring btw) but it is white.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 05/01/2011 - 06:17

Mark, I've had a different experience here with Magnolia stellata and have given up growing it.  It seemed far more susceptible here to spring frosts than M. soulangeana.  An added part of the equation here is wind and that may be what M. stellata doesn't like.  Rhododendron p.j.m. never liked the wind here and is not part of the garden.  Everyone I know, of course, grows it very well.  Everything in the crevice gardens starting to burst into bloom.  No time to photograph!


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 05/01/2011 - 22:13

Skulski wrote:

People in these parts experiment with Magnolia stellata... how satisfactory it is, especially here in the chinook zone, I don't know.

I'd have to look it up to be sure, but if I remember correctly from Toronto, that might be the one I don't care for...lol--I don't know the species, really, but remember there were some with very elegant more closed upright flowers, and others with narrower petals in floppy flowers that made me think of tissue paper flapping around on the trees...lol.. I'd have to look them up...

My yard is kinder to trees to than some spots-- a lot of wind shelter...


Submitted by Mark McD on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 07:22

Hoy wrote:

It is no doubt. Magnolias tolerate and maybe prefere cold winters but they do best where the summers are really hot! (At least hotter than here)
Mark, do you get seeds of your stellata pink form? Stellata is good here and I have one in my garden (very floriferous this spring btw) but it is white.

Yes, it makes lots of bright orange red seeds, I think I have a few potted seedlings in my "nursery area".  I can collect seed this fall.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 12:11

Actually, Cohan, it might fit your description, but I always liked it because in this area it blooms before Magnolia soulangeana.  Which may have been the problem.  This is a cold garden with no protection from wind.  At any rate, it just didn't thrive in my garden.  (Translation - it died!)


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 14:07

McDonough wrote:

Hoy wrote:

It is no doubt. Magnolias tolerate and maybe prefere cold winters but they do best where the summers are really hot! (At least hotter than here)
Mark, do you get seeds of your stellata pink form? Stellata is good here and I have one in my garden (very floriferous this spring btw) but it is white.

Yes, it makes lots of bright orange red seeds, I think I have a few potted seedlings in my "nursery area".  I can collect seed this fall.

Mark, if you do not set up a nursery, you can make a fortune selling seeds ;D


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 21:05

Look Todd, I'm catching up! ;D  First flower on Besseya alpina, barely starting to bloom - from seed in 2009.

First bud on Paraquilegia microphylla, planted last year! (Well, it's a start!  ;))

I don't expect these will be any great shakes in the flower department (we'll see soon), but the foliage is nice and furry... Arabis androsacea, from seed last year:

Still waiting for Thlaspi kurdicum to let loose...

Saxifraga sancta v. macedonica... with a seedling, ex. Sax. 'Mrs. Winifred Bevington' growing in it!  (Sheesh, the only seedling I've found... why did it have to give me a dilemma of whether or not to pull it out of the other plant?!?)
 

Androsace carnea 'Alba'... which will change quite a bit in appearance as the flower stems elongate:


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 01:44

A few pictures taken of our sand bed this spring - started in 2007 and the Yucca is really going places! From top to bottom: Yucca whipplei, Aquilegia grahamii, Lupinus albifrons, Ptilotrichium spinosum, Stachys citrina in foreground; overall view of sand bed, newer planting in front (still to be top-dressed with grit); Arenaria tetraquetra (lovely tight cushion - one of the great attributes of this type of culture); Poygala calcarea (a real winner, self-sowing gently) and Dianthus haematocalyx; Asplenium ceterach (the 'Rusty Back fern', a really useful indicator plant, showing drought by curling up its fronds. I will definitely try more small xerophytic ferns in the bed as time goes on - Asplenium trichomanes also grows well).

This is only a very small bed in our very large garden but gives an inordinate amount of pleasure. I am tempted now to try a more elaborate 'berm' as I have seen in American articles, for genera like Eriogonum, Penstemon, and a host of others. Unfortunately our climate may not be summer-hot enough to succeed with some, and Acantholimon for example grow well but do not flower.

There are a lot more plants to come later into the summer so I will post some of these later on.


Submitted by RickR on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 13:10

I can see why you're so proud.  There are so many interesting plants nestled in there!

Were the wooden stakes used for winter protection for the Yucca and Juniper?


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 20:34

Despite cold nights, spring is here and every day there seems to be something new.
1. Phlox pungens - crevice garden
2. Phlox pulvinata - trough
3. Petrocallis pyrenaica - crevice


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Thu, 05/05/2011 - 01:44

Rick - yes the stakes were for a winter cover with dutch lights. We normally only have intermittant snow and plenty of rain over winter and after a year with no cover quite a few plants did less well. The bed is simply a deep hole (ca. 30-45cm) filled with, in my case, a sharp potting grit made from heat shattered flint (the larger grades are used for 'pebble' dashing on houses). At the time I wondered if this would be too sharp compared to the normal sharp sand or ballast that is recommended, but it works well given supplementary watering in dry spells like we are having at the moment. There is no organic matter except that which comes with the plants (I don't wash the roots when I plant). However, I haven't put in a membrane underneath and so worms are steadily bringing up soil and quite a few of the plants must have got their roots down into the soil anyway. So far I have used no fertiliser though i know some growers recommend this.

I was particularly stimulated by the photographs in Ken Druse's book, 'The Collector's Garden', of the Kelaidises garden in Denver, which is infinitely more interesting than a lawn! Unfortunately we don't have that extreme climate here but it would be great to create something similar with different plants.


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 05/05/2011 - 21:34

Spectacular plants, Tim and Anne!

Updates on Thlaspi kurdicum and my first Besseya alpina:
 

I'm pleased to see that Cheiranthus roseus did not bloom itself to death last year... whether these are non-blooming plants from the previous year, or if some might not be totally monocarpic, I'm not sure.  Happy to see some apparent seedlings too.
 


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 04:40

Lori, love the Besseya alpina.  I'm growing that and get wonderful foliage and no flowers (both B.alpina and B.wyomingensis).  Must be doing something wrong.  I'm really fond of all the plants with those fancy exserted stamens (such a Valeriana supina).
Here are some of the things in bloom in the crevice garden and nearby.


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 11:56

If only we could grow Lewisia tweedyi and Eritrichium howardii outside! It would make the garden incredibly exciting. I've grown them both in pots and enjoyed them, but somehow it's not the same. One question for anyone keen on Astragalus and Oxytropis - I've always thought these would be ideal sand bed plants but I've never had much success. I'd also like to try the little lupins (and at least L. albifrons does well and I should try some of its smallest forms). Do these plants grow in American gardens?


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 13:27

I grow as many Astragalus and Oxytropis and Trifoliums as possible.  They're my favorites, but a lot of planning has to be done.  Mine have great drainage, both in the mix and also they are placed where they get very positive air drainage and full sun.  Lupinus albifrons does well here but is not long-lasting.  Some astragali are easier than others.  An easy one to start with is Astragalus monspessulans.  Also Oxytropis multiceps.  Most of the Rocky Mountain peas seem to need to dry out at the crown in our moist climate and have moisture available way down.  Crevice planting has been very successful so far, more so than the sand bed.  And dry screes are also good.  They are not natural plants here in the northeast, but with some attention can do quite well,  at least well-enough to keep a pea-lover like me happy.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 13:29

Today in the garden, an unkown but very beautiful astragalus.  Creamy yellow flowers, everything is very furry.  Label long lost to the antlered rats.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 15:59

Thanks, Cliff.  It is indeed gorgeous, but WHAT IS IT?  Anyone have any ideas?  It is definitely an astragalus.


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 16:15

Thanks Anne - so perhaps I do need to make a crevice garden as an adjunct to the sand beds, or maybe grow some of these plants between crevices in troughs. The only species I have grown really well is Astragalus utahensis, which does remarkably well in a pot. But reading of these plants in Claude Barr's 'Jewels of the Plains' and elsewhere is very appealing. I haven't tried species of Trifolium.


Submitted by Toole on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 19:19

Spiegel wrote:

Today in the garden, an unkown but very beautiful astragalus.  Creamy yellow flowers, everything is very furry.  Label long lost to the antlered rats.

Yummy  :P :P
From another pea lover.

Cheers Dave


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 05/09/2011 - 04:46

Spiegel wrote:

Today in the garden, an unkown but very beautiful astragalus.  Creamy yellow flowers, everything is very furry.  Label long lost to the antlered rats.

Better to loose the label than that plant!


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Mon, 05/09/2011 - 05:50

I've got a few more pictures from our sand bed which is slowly being top-dressed with new grit - a slow old process but very satisfying. With all the talk of crevice gardens (especially in the UK), its a great surprise more comment is not made of sand beds - they are equally effective for many plants, but do perhaps need more care and cover over the winter. Perhaps they are just too easy!

From top: Edraianthus pumilio (in its superb silver-leaved form owerinianus)
              Stachys citrina
              Silene hookeri (what a plant!)
              Thymus 'Peter Davis'
              Overall view of bed with Yucca whipplei and Dasylirion species

There is also a beautiful annual gentian flowering, G. syringea, from the Himalayas (see under G. nivalis thread elsewhere)


Submitted by Peter George on Mon, 05/09/2011 - 07:22

Yesterday was beautiful, and my Daphnes are all in bloom. Here are a couple, Daphne x napolitana and Daphne cneorum 'Porteous.' The latter was purchased from Wrightman's 3 years ago, and was about the size of a bottle cap. It's been unbelievably floriferous, and is now about 18 inches in diameter, and still totally prostrate. Harvey told me that he found it in Barrie Porteous' garden, stuck away in one of his huge troughs, and took a few cuttings. What a find!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Mon, 05/09/2011 - 07:44

Re: sand beds.  They are indeed easy, especially if they are like mine and are just pure sand.  Yours looks very good.  High desert plants love them as do many penstemons, townsendias and eriogonums.  I've found that I can grow a wider range of plants here in crevice gardens.  The close spaces between rocks remain cooler and seem to retain more moisture deep down.  I think even a western plant growing in dry as a bone clay with big cracks from drought have some moisture available to them deep down.  Ranunculus seguieri, a snow-melt plant and not a drought-lover, can grow in the Dolomiotes in bare high meadow spots in soil that looks and acts much like western clay.  That may be partly due to their preferring their own company and putting themselves in places without much competition, but also because there is moisture available to them well below the surface. 


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 05/09/2011 - 12:30

When I get time I have to construct a sand bed, that's for sure!

Here are some pics from one of my "wild beds"! This tulip (Tulipa sylvestris) is a very old (several 100 years) garden plant in Norway and it has escaped gardens since day one. It has also come as a ballast plant - as seeds or bulbs together with the sand and soil the tall ship used as ballast when returning from Europe after delivering its cargo - timber, ice etc. You'll find it many places at the coast. It spreads by seed and runners making a bulb at the apex.

               


Submitted by Mark McD on Mon, 05/09/2011 - 17:58

Trond, mine has produced flowers once or twice over the past 7-8 years... lots of foliage, but rarely flowers.  The foliage is starting to run, so I may try digging it out in a couple spots where I have it, not sure what it needs that I'm not supplying, possibly my garden is too dry for it?  The problem might be that I have it planted in shade (it was suggested to me that it grows in shady woodland areas) but might actually need sunnier spots to flower.  I have a strong feeling of deja vu discussing this plant ;)


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Tue, 05/10/2011 - 00:32

Mark, I too have grown this plant for many years with hardly a flower. A visitor once told me they had a much more free-flowering form, and it is lovely to see the Norwegian colonies and to hear how they arrived. Mine started off in the shade of a willow until that was blown down and are now in full sun. Are there any other tulips that run in the same way? It's a little like a few of the crocus even though a very different bulb.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Tue, 05/10/2011 - 04:17

Seen in the garden which is enjoying a lovely spring now - days with sun and cloud and not too warm - cool nights but no killing frosts.  Just a couple of pictures of what's happening.  Because of the weather the Onosma albo-rosea is lasting a long time.  Aquilegia scopoulorum is quite variable in nature, from quite small to a bit too tall for a trough.  This one is a nice size for a trough, although not the smallest.


Submitted by Mark McD on Tue, 05/10/2011 - 04:54

Anne, the Onosma is GORGEOUS, love the low plant habit as well as the flower color.  Aquilegia scopulorum is half bad too ;)... looking mighty fine in your trough.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Tue, 05/10/2011 - 16:27

Mark, I've grown this onosma for many years and this is the first plant I've had where the flowers turned a deep coral instead of the usual purply pink.  I really think the color is marvelous.  And, I have two self-sown seedlings, also a first.  It's been blooming for several weeks now.


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 05:01

The onosma is actually growing at the edge of the tufa crevice garden so it is also getting more lime than the others I have.  They have a tendency to get very woody and that's when a winter without much snow seems to carry it away.  They can last up to ten years or more, though.


Submitted by Kelaidis on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 11:49

It's great fun looking at all of your gardens. Ann Spiegel: you are beyond amazing! I can't believe how wonderful your astragalus and phlox look: much better than they do here. And all the classic Maritime Alpines to boot! That pink Magnolia stellata is to die for, Mark. And thrilled to see Tim Ingram's sand beds and gems.

A few things from my garden: it's raining buckets as I type this (first rain in weeks) so I am heaving big sighs of relief. I've planted hundreds of plants in the last week and was tired of running around and trying to keep them watered. Artificial watering can never replace natural rain. We had an enormous plant sale at Denver Botanic Gardens last weekend: over 15,000 people and nearly a quarter million dollars gross! Lots of great alpines sold (and everything else as well, for that matter). We had almost no plants by Saturday morning (the sale started Friday). If we'd restocked we could have easily done of $300,000 I believe.

A few pix from my garden: the first is an overview with Draba rigida in the foreground near the stream. The second shows Daphne juliae and Aubrieta gracilis (the tiniest Aubrieta--and the best!). The Iris bloudowii was a first for me (although I saw it in the Altai blooming two years ago). The purple iris came from Beaver Creek where they claim it was from the Altai: looks far more like Iris pumila to me, however (which is far more westerly in distribution: any ideas?)... There are a few pix from Denver Botanic Gardens I couldn't resist (the Erythronium albidum for one, and the troughs with Physaria bellii and Townsendia parryi spilling over the sides...)--I should do a whole series just from there..but most are from my garden which has never looked better!

All the best to you all at the height of North Tmperate Spring!


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 12:17

Great stuff! Trond, love that Tulip :) I have T sprengeri seedlings, which is also supposed to be a bit of a woodland sp..
Anne--great Onosma!


Submitted by Weiser on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 14:08

Well spring has finally settled in.
Cistanthe tweedyi ( syn. Lewisia tweedyi)

Fritillaria atropurpurea this is a small dry-land lily from western North America.

Delphinium andersonii

Camissonia tanacetifolia ssp. tanacetifolia

Eriogonum douglasii var. meridionale

Gilia tricolor

Grusonia clavata and Lewisia rediviva var. minor

General views


Submitted by Peter George on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 14:44

First blooming Lewisia of the season for me, L. brachycalyx. I've had it for 4 years, and each year it gets a bit larger and adds a few more blooms.


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 15:02

Very nice plants all of you have! Remarkable how many different plants that exists - and which I would like to grow :D

A few from my garden this evening.

An unknown woodland thing - started from seed a couple of years ago. Lamium orvala

This is the Potentilla with the biggest flowers I know of - and the the leaves are like strawberry leaves: Potentilla megalantha.

A seedling of some peony. Don't know the parents.


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 17:18

Panayoti--love the Physaria and Townsendia together!
Hoy, in this partial view,  your unknown woodlander reminds a lot of Galeopsis tetrahit and Stachys palustris- the former a not very bothersome introduced weed here, and the latter a potentially aggressive but pretty native ;)


Submitted by Lori S. on Wed, 05/11/2011 - 17:25

Wow, spring is bustin' out all over in your areas!!  :o  Fabulous scenes and plants!
Trond, I think your unknown woodland plant is Lamium orvala.

I know it is a bit heretical, but I actually prefer the more modest, smaller flowered lewisia species such as L. brachycalyx to the big, blowsy-flowered cultivars.


Submitted by Hoy on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 05:03

I think you are right, Lori. I remember that name and the pictures I  found seem to confirm it. Thanks both of you, Cohan and Lori!
(I am getting lazy - it is easier to ask somebody here than to look it up yourself!)


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 09:26

While the other eight willow species I grow are long done blooming, the catkins of Salix schraderiana are still looking good...

             


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 10:00

Seeing John, Anne and Panayoti's gardens is extremely exciting for me because I have a yen for the mountain plants from dry habitats and the traditions in Britain have always been much more the plants of the Alps and Himalayas and China - the interest in summer dry habitats has centred more on bulbs. It would be great to see more AGS members making such gardens, if only to capitalise more on our dry climate in the south-east. The rest of our front lawn is due for the chop!


Submitted by Kelaidis on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 10:13

We need to get you out to the States, Tim! Any plans for 2012? Maybe we can organize a lecture tour?

John: your Lewisia tweedyi puts our's to shame! I so regret not seeing your garden in the growing season (although it was pretty stunning in March). You are amazing! Your garden and the Stiremans' in Utah are the finest dryland gardens I know (including dozens of pretty good ones in Colorado...).


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 16:40

I am so enjoying seeing all these wonderful gardens.  Our slow spring here is continuing.  Last year I went to a Connecticut Chapter meeting and the temperature hit 95!!!  When that happens the rock garden is finished in a matter of days, not many weks because evrything is forced and then over.
1. Corner of trough with Hymenoxys lapidicola and Lewisia brachycalyx with many seedlings of  same popping up.
2. Trifolium owyheense protected from deer this winter and it is repaying the effort.  From Alplains seed.


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 00:53

Anne, the clover is really cute.. I've been looking at some of the Trifolium species--pretty flowers, but some of the foliage would be traumatic for me, I think...lol.. clovers are some of my most difficult weeds (being surrounded by farmland where its encouraged as forage...lol)


Submitted by Booker on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 03:14

Wonderful images (and plants) everybody ... your strong sunlight accentuates the colour and enables some stunning photography.
We are more used to mists and mellow fruitfulness - even in early summer.  :D
I am amazed that I can even contemplate building a sand bed in this northern English climate!  No, perhaps I can't!  :D


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 05:04

Cohan, you don't have to worry about Trifolium owyheense ramping about.  It's definitely not a weed.  The foliage is nicely mottled (not really descriptive but don't know how else to say it) and the flowers are huge and gorgeous.  The last time I grew this I seem to remember the flowers being a lighter pink.  Cliff, yes you CAN try a sand bed, why ever not?  You might be really surprised at what you could grow there.


Submitted by Weiser on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 13:00

Kelaidis wrote:

You are amazing! Your garden and the Stiremans' in Utah are the finest dryland gardens I know (including dozens of pretty good ones in Colorado...).

Oh shucks! Your way to kind.  :-[
Your garden is nothing to sneeze at either by the way.  :D

Anne I like the combination of Hymenoxys lapidicola and your lovely Lewisia brachycalyx.
        Your Trifolium owyheense is a rare treasure indeed. Wish seed were available for it. I've talked to Idaho gardeners who have visited it's limited habitat. It grows on crusty ash and tuff substrates. It's nice to see it thriving in your garden. Here is a little article about it.

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/cdc/cdc_pdf/u01man08.pdf


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 13:11

RickR wrote:

While the other eight willow species I grow are long done blooming, the catkins of Salix schraderiana are still looking good...

Rick, I really like this one!

Anne, that trefoil is stunning! I have sowed some Trifolium seed this spring and many are germinating now. However owyheense was unknown to me! Now it is on my list!


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 13:33

No garden walk today - or this weekend. We are heading north to Ålesund to pick up our youngest daughter. Have to stay the night here in Jølster. It is raining however and the view isn't the best.
This is not a fjord but a fjordlike lake 205m above sea level. The lake is 20km long, 233 m deep and usually don't freeze over in winter. Trout is a common fish here.

           


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 21:02

The seed for the Trifolium owyheense came from Alan Bradshaw of Aplains.  I always have good luck with Alan's seeds and I think he had it listed this year too.  I know it grows in a limited area with very different "soil".  Here it's growing in a limey scree (roughly  ph 8 ) that is sloped west-southwest and has very sharp drainage.  It's very open and has sun most of the day including the hot afternoon sun.  No water is added and there are a lot of astragalus and oxytropis growing on this slope.


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 23:00

Spiegel wrote:

Cohan, you don't have to worry about Trifolium owyheense ramping about.  It's definitely not a weed.  The foliage is nicely mottled (not really descriptive but don't know how else to say it) and the flowers are huge and gorgeous.  The last time I grew this I seem to remember the flowers being a lighter pink.  Cliff, yes you CAN try a sand bed, why ever not?  You might be really surprised at what you could grow there.

Thanks, Anne-- I know some of these little ones are not dangerous, but if the leaves look like regular clover I might be a bit unsettled...lol.. this from someone trying fancy Taraxacums, when officinale germinates in every available centimetre of soil! But, clovers are just as common as dandelions, and they spread by creeping stems...lol.. pretty flowers though... sound like interesting colours on some..


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 05/14/2011 - 14:35

Still no garden view but from the window of the hotel.
Today we picked up our daughter, tomorrow we are heading home - plan to use two days. The shortest way includes 5 fjord crossings with ferry.

The ferries on the last stretch:

Tomorrow we are driving along the fjord further inland.

   


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 05/14/2011 - 17:08

Hoy wrote:

Still no garden view but from the window of the hotel.
Today we picked up our daughter, tomorrow we are heading home - plan to use two days. The shortest way includes 5 fjord crossings with ferry.
The ferries on the last stretch:
Tomorrow we are driving along the fjord further inland.

5 crossings! Wow, I can't imagine, I have been on ferries not many more times that that in my life--we used to visit relatives on Vancouver island, and of  course had to cross by ferry, those are very large ones, of course..oh, and Italy to Greece-- a long night ill dozing on the floor outside the bathroom...lol


Submitted by Boland on Sat, 05/14/2011 - 18:57

Beautiful scenery Trond!

Here are some flowers from my garden today....Corydalis solida, Ficara 'Flore-pleno' and Sanginaria canadensis 'Rosea'


Submitted by RickR on Sat, 05/14/2011 - 21:00

All you guys' mountainous terrain puts me in awe.  I wouldn't say I live in real flat land, but interesting looking hills (and gullies) always make me want to explore them.  If I lived over there, Trond, I would want to climb every mountain!  (Kinda puts a new twist on the movie "The Sound of Music", doesn't it?)

Todd, looking only at the flower, that doesn't even look like a bloodroot!  And ten petals, too...


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 05/14/2011 - 21:44

I have not had much time at home in the garden lately so I will try to catch up a bit now...
Adonis vernalis and A. xamurensis 'Fukujukai':
   

Arabis androsacea, now in bloom - I told you it wouldn't stop traffic!  ;)

Draba sp. and Jovibarba hirta; another Draba:
 

Hepatica nobilis 'Rosea Plena'

Paraquilegia microphylla - this year's one flower now open!

Primula marginata - the ratty-looking old plant from earlier, all filled in now!

Vitaliana primuliflora v. cinerea:


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 05/14/2011 - 22:01

Trollius laxus starting to bloom:

Primula rusbyi - one old plant has decided to bloom a bit again this year, after taking a couple of years off; I still need to propagate them to rejuvenate them, I think.

Anemone blanda:
 

Paeonia tenuifolia 'Plena':

Pulmonaria altaica:

Caltha palustris:

Corydalis solida:
 

Pulsatilla vulgaris 'Papageno'... and that's the neighbor's lawn, not ours - we rid ourselves of that plant long ago!  ;D


Submitted by Lori S. on Sat, 05/14/2011 - 23:05

Hacquetia epipactis:
 

Corydalis nobilis:

Lilium martagon... some others in later parts of the yard are just emerging.

Petrocallis pyrenaica:

Sanguinaria canadensis:


Submitted by Boland on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 04:46

Spectacular display Lori!  You have such choice plants.  I finally got a Paraquilegia microphyllus and I'm afraid to plant it out, yet yours seems OK in calgary.  I wonder if they can take winter wet.  You are inching ahead of me....we have had mostly rain, drizzle and fog this past 2 week and cold temps...only 4 C yesterday.  Plants are once more in suspended animation around here.  On the plus side, the spring bulbs will be open for weeks!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 04:58

Wonderful plants, Lori, especially that Petrocallis pyrenaica.  Great shot of the Paeonia tenuifolia foliage. I just learned via the Scottish Forum that what I've been growing as P. tenuifolia is actually P. intermedia.  Quite a surprise!  You have such a wide range of beautiful plants in your garden.


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 10:45

A few more plants growing in our front garden and looking good at the moment. Dianthus 'Eileen Lever' is a fantastically free-flowering selection from Aberconwy Nursery; on the sand bed I also have a really deep red 'pink' of which I have lost the name (but it must be a well known form); Lithodora x intermedia, one of my all time favourites from a favourite family; Teucrium aroanum, a little plant but with disproportionate sized flowers a lot more showy than many of its relatives; Penstemon ovatus. I had a spell trying to grow lots of different species but this one has persisted very well, self-sowing gently and such a glorious colour; Potentilla fruticosa 'Beesii', I think the finest form with a neat habit and silvery-silky leaves. Finally one of the oddest and rarest plants in the garden, the Turkish Pelargonium quercetorum. This hasn't really flowered well and must be benefiting from our long dry and warm spring. I tried P. endlicherianum on the sand bed thinking it would do well, and it hasn't!

It's astonishing how many plants you can grow in your garden after more than 30 years, and there is a lot of useful seed and cutting material!


Submitted by Hoy on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 14:32

Todd wrote:

Spectacular display Lori!  You have such choice plants.  I finally got a Paraquilegia microphyllus and I'm afraid to plant it out, yet yours seems OK in calgary.  I wonder if they can take winter wet.  You are inching ahead of me....we have had mostly rain, drizzle and fog this past 2 week and cold temps...only 4 C yesterday.  Plants are once more in suspended animation around here.  On the plus side, the spring bulbs will be open for weeks!

Todd, I planted Paraquilegia last spring and it survived the last winter here but no flowers yet.

You all have so many interesting plants! Interesting to see which plants all have and which only few have!

Today we have steered southward again but to avoid some ferries and to see new terrain we took one of the more inland road. That implies longer drive and more ups and downs!

Along the fjords it is all green - except huge fields with dandelions!

 

In the valleys you can still see the last remnants of the avalanches through the woods. The woods consist mostly of birch and alder but also aspen, rowan and in the lower parts of linden and elm. In the understory of the woods you can find a lot of plants but we had no time to look for that now!

   

Some of the valleys end abruptly and the road has to climb steeply up to the pass before descending again.

   

The higher grounds are still snowcovered.

 

Down to the next fjord -Geirangerfjorden.


Submitted by cohan on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 15:20

Great views, Trond, really interesting landscapes.. but best of all for me is to see places that have snow longer than me  ;D


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 16:13

Thanks, all!

Trond, it looks like the snow plow has quite a job keeping that road open!  :o  The switchbacks are amazing too... I only see ones like that on hiking trails.  It seems odd to have avalanches running down into deciduous trees, whereas here, it is spruce and firs at those elevations.  Very interesting to see your part of the world, Trond.

Todd, Paraquilegia are grown to exquisite perfection here by Stephanie Ferguson... too bad that it was too late to see them in bloom when you were here in July.  I believe the plant I showed is a seedling she gave me.  :)  By the way, terrific plants and photos - your photography skills are incredible! 

Anne, I went and read the peony discussion at SRGC and found it very helpful.  I also have slightly broader-leaved plants I received as P. tenuifolia that I've always wondered about... I believe they are likely P. intermedia too!  Here's one below (from later in the season):

Fabulous garden shots, Tim!


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 20:40

Lori, your peony looks just like mine.  I always thought the foliage to be very dissected until I saw the pictures of the "real" Paeonia tenuifolia.  P. tenuifolia supposedly has pure red flowers but in the pictures you can see some pink like mine or perhaps that's just the camera.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 20:44

Well, I just spent the day out weeding and moving things around to prepare for an extension to the tufa bed, and what did I see on my garden walk but... HORRORS!!... two small patches of what I feel is almost certainly Campanula rapunculoides!  :o  Crazy winds two winters ago likely brought the seeds (as we live on a corner, and these patches are far from the neighboring yard... which, I came to realize last year (upon seeing a bouquet of stems in a jar  :-X :P ??? :o), does harbour this fiend - amazing I haven't been invaded sooner) and I was pulling out suspicious-looking campanula seedlings last summer from the one area... This year, the white carrot-like roots on the little plants I evidently missed are sending out ominous networks of lateral roots.  IMO, this is truly one of the worst garden weeds in North America!!  
Here I was, ruthlessly rooting out relatively-innocent seedlings of C. trachelium and C. kolenatiana while the REAL enemy caught me unawares!  Anyway, I can see that I have a new pastime...    :rolleyes:  But I will prevail!!!  >:(


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 20:50

Lori, which hedysarum is it that you grow.  Hedysarum cappadocica has flowers for the first time and it really caps the week in the garden.  Yes, it's a small plant but have never had any success at all with this genus.


Submitted by Lori S. on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 20:55

Wow!  :o That's positively electric, Anne!
The only one I grow is Hedysarum boreale var boreale and here are some older photos of it (I don't think it's even emerged yet - Correction:  It's up about 8").
 


Submitted by RickR on Sun, 05/15/2011 - 22:28

Wow, what an explosion of great plants and photos !!!

Love the architectural effect of the Dianthus/Yucca (or Agave) photo, Tim.  I just bought a couple Yucca nana plants at a local Friends School sale here for $5 each. 


Submitted by cohan on Mon, 05/16/2011 - 00:19

Skulski wrote:

Well, I just spent the day out weeding and moving things around to prepare for an extension to the tufa bed, and what did I see on my garden walk but... HORRORS!!... two small patches of what I feel is almost certainly Campanula rapunculoides!  :o  Crazy winds two winters ago likely brought the seeds (as we live on a corner, and these patches are far from the neighboring yard... which, I came to realize last year (upon seeing a bouquet of stems in a jar  :-X :P ??? :o), does harbour this fiend - amazing I haven't been invaded sooner) and I was pulling out suspicious-looking campanula seedlings last summer from the one area... This year, the white carrot-like roots on the little plants I evidently missed are sending out ominous networks of lateral roots.  IMO, this is truly one of the worst garden weeds in North America!!  
Here I was, ruthlessly rooting out relatively-innocent seedlings of C. trachelium and C. kolenatiana while the REAL enemy caught me unawares!  Anyway, I can see that I have a new pastime...    :rolleyes:  But I will prevail!!!  >:(

Funny, I've read this is supposed to be invasive, but we have a patch planted by my aunt or mom years ago, and though there has been a bit of spread there, it hasn't cropped up elsewhere on the property.. much more aggressive, here,  it seems to me are Geranium himalayense (if only I liked the flower colour :( --though this is also mostly/entirely vegetative spread, there are several patches of several square metres) and some purple spikey thing--maybe a tall Veronica--this definitely seeds around.... don't know how hard any of them are to get rid of ( I have heard the Campanula is very hard--but the roots are edible!) as I haven't done much in the areas they are planted, but may make some efforts to plant some additional stuff near them this year....


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 05/16/2011 - 10:29

Two very pretty Hedysarums, Anne and Lori! I haven't yet had any luck with that genus. But I hope to mend that soon.....


Submitted by AmyO on Mon, 05/16/2011 - 10:40

A few pretty things that have been in bloom for the past few days. Every day brings more beauty...the plants are loving this cool & rainy weather, but it is so frustrating to have to run out between downpours to try and get anything done!  :P


Submitted by Hoy on Mon, 05/16/2011 - 10:53

Cohan: Several places we visited the last days were still snowcovered!

Lori: Birch is the common tree line kind of trees here. Spruces are exotic and planted only the last hundred years. (In the eastern parts spruce is common.) You can find pinewoods high up but usually on drier land. Some places foreign firs and larches are planted too.

The last day on the road. We stayed the night at Mundal Hotell in the small place of Mundal. The former vice president of USA Walter Mondale has his name from this place ;D
The hotel is 120 years this year and has seen better days but is cozy and charming. View from my window early this morning.

 

No time to look at the flowers but some could be seen on the few stops we had.
Matteuccia struthiopteris is very common in the moist woods. Orchis mascula is also common at the road verges.
 

We escaped two fjord crossings but had several more mountain crossings on our way home. This is Vikafjell and typically you see the old road still snowcovered and the "new" road disappearing into a tunnel. In this part of Norway there are several hundreds of them. You also find the World's longest road tunnel here (24.5km/15.2miles).


Submitted by Boland on Mon, 05/16/2011 - 18:04

Amy, your growing season is also jumping ahead of mine....my Jeffersonia is barely showing buds yet my Primula denticulata and Asarum canadense is in full bloom.  Lori you are getting way ahead of me...paeonia tenuifolia is just starting to show its bud here.

More lovely scenery Trond!

Sunny today but still icy-cold...only 8 C.

Anemone blanda...a rock wall was built on top of it...doesn't seem to cause it any harm!  Also in flower troday: Anemone ranunculoides, Primula X seriana and Sanguinaria canadensis.


Submitted by Lori S. on Mon, 05/16/2011 - 21:48

Wonderful things, Amy!  It's worth going out in the rain for that!  :)

Trond, thanks for those beautiful pictures, especially the alpine scenery.

Your area will soon catch up, Todd (if in fact it's behind - it seems like you're ahead for some things, not for others).  Wow, (as I said before) your photos are incredible!  :o

A few more things here...
Thlaspi kurdicum, covered in bloom... I guess I'll keep it.  ;)

Eritrichium pauciflorum ssp. sajanense, from seed last year:

Primula algida, from seed last year:

Primula marginata 'Sheila Denby':
 

A couple of choice selections (from the 2+ trays-full I bought at the CRAGS spring plant sale).... Lomatium columbianum and Trifolium owyheense:
 

I have a couple of seedlings (finally) in a pot of Lomatium columbianum but I couldn't turn up the chance to get a more established plant.


Submitted by cohan on Mon, 05/16/2011 - 22:54

Beuties, Todd, love the A blanda!
Lori--great Thlaspi indeed :) I was going to ask if the CRAGS sale had already happened this year...


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 05/17/2011 - 00:21

Glad you liked the pictures from our roundtrip to Ålesund although the weather wasn't the best and pictures was mostly taken through the car window!
Lori, switchbacks are the rule on Norwegian roads - except on a few main ones ;D In fact the old roads were build where the horsetracks went in earlier times.

I am always a little jealous on those of you growing plants I don't have or can't! But it always inspire to try when I see pictures here ;D

How could you ever think of getting rid of that Thlaspi, Lori?

I think you manage well even in rain, Amy! Btw don't you have a raincoat? ;D

Todd, do you know the provenience of that Anemone ranunculuoides? The leaves look different from my clones.


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Tue, 05/17/2011 - 01:08

Trond, I've only been to Norway once but it was enchanting and your pictures bring it back. We travelled by various means from Bergen to Geirangerfjord and my most amazing memory was walking to one of the deserted farms perched up on the side of the fjord. No wonder the Vikings were such intrepid explorers! (We have just had an 'Icelandic' season on TV to prove this).


Submitted by RickR on Tue, 05/17/2011 - 11:35

I knew you had been holding back on posting the SO MANY things you grow so well, Lori. 

I actually prefer the Thlapsi in mostly bud, just as I like the Viburnum x 'Juddii' and Viburnum carlesii currently wafting their scent through my house windows.


Submitted by cohan on Tue, 05/17/2011 - 19:18

Flowers at last on some of my few spring flowering plants.. pics from May 11 to 14
https://picasaweb.google.com/cactuscactus/May11To142011SpringGardenFlowers#

Corydalis solida 'Munich Sunrise' (if I am remembering correctly, can't seem to find any written confirmation...) from an SRGC forumist in Europe, in 09, doing nicely.. colour is brighter than seems in most of the shots...last one is about right..

   

Pulsatilla vulgaris

   

The only retic Iris that has come up in this bed--either really slow or they didn't like something-- extra long, wet melt period? Scillas seem fine, as do Pulsatillas.... growing beside it is--?-probably a native Ribes...


Submitted by Lori S. on Tue, 05/17/2011 - 23:07

Very nice, Cohan!

Thanks for the kind words, Rick...  I like to think I grow a fair variety of things but I think most not terribly well!  :-[

Gentiana verna getting ready to roll...

A tough little Daphne retusa, whose evergreen foliage is somewhat frost-burnt; that one little flower cluster (first I have actually witnessed in bloom  :rolleyes:) is amazingly fragrant!

Anemone ranunculoides:


Submitted by Hoy on Tue, 05/17/2011 - 23:47

Tim wrote:

Trond, I've only been to Norway once but it was enchanting and your pictures bring it back. We travelled by various means from Bergen to Geirangerfjord and my most amazing memory was walking to one of the deserted farms perched up on the side of the fjord. No wonder the Vikings were such intrepid explorers! (We have just had an 'Icelandic' season on TV to prove this).

You are welcome back any time, Tim!


Submitted by Hoy on Wed, 05/18/2011 - 00:20

Cohan, seems the spring has arrived at your place ;D Nice plants too.

Lori, don't be too humble, in my opinion Rick is right ;)

I have few places to grow small plants. Everything grow to considerable sizes here - the weeds too.
Therefore I often use huge plants like these:

Podophyllum aurantiocaule

Diphylleia sinensis

 

Asphodelus albus with a twist this year!

. . and in one of the beds I manage to keep the weed away. Calceolaria biflora


Submitted by cohan on Wed, 05/18/2011 - 00:48

Thanks, Lori and Trond! BTW-- I think I finally see some more retic Irises coming up! last year they were not so late... Scillas on the other hand, came up early, but are taking forever to open flrs...
Lori, must agree with the others--you seem to be growing things very nicely indeed! issues of climate and learning where you can place the plants to best advantage (issues everyone has) that you have mentioned, notwithstanding!
Thinking about growing well, and what it means,  I'm not sure that a lot of fussing equals growing well (or at least, that's only one kind of growing well) I'd mostly rather aim for the type of growing well that involves understanding good plant choices, preparation and placement to avoid fussing  ;D

Trond, I know about weed issues--I sometimes think I am crazy trying to garden with so many vigorous things trying to grow in any inch of exposed soil, and you are right, small plants are even harder...lol.. your big plants are nice! This small bed I have with spring flowers, I try to weed every time I stop to look at it, and still I took the photos of the Pulsatilla and found a fat clover behind it...lol..sometimes the weeds aren't so bad--in the woodland bed with the C solida, is a self-sown native C aurea--huge and lush and soon to flower!


Submitted by WimB on Wed, 05/18/2011 - 02:41

Wonderful plants, everyone...nice to see spring again in your gardens....

Here are some plants which are flowering here now:
Heuchera x brizoides 'Pruhoniciana Alba' and Dicentra eximia
Papaver orientale 'Salmon Pink'
and Polygonatum cirrhifolium 'Red Form'


Submitted by Boland on Wed, 05/18/2011 - 17:57

Bizarre Polygonatum Wim!

Cohan, you are just a week or so behind me...quick to catch up with your sunny weather compared to my cloudy.

Never heard of that Podophyllum species Trond...very attractive.

Lori, you're killing me with G. verna....love it but can't grow it.

Some images from today...Omphalodes verna, Primula 'Dale's Red', Rhododendron racemosum, Sanguinaria canadensis 'Rosea' and Viola corsica.


Submitted by cohan on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 00:11

Stunning images Todd!
I still don't have much planted (besides seed pots!) so I wont be doing much catching up  ;D but the wildflowers are racing along! I found another 3 things flowering today that I wasn't expecting so hard on the heels of Petasites and Caltha, but maybe its just because I forget when they should be...lol Should be a good year for woodland flowers after all the snow...


Submitted by WimB on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 02:36

cohan wrote:

Interesting Polygonatum!

Thanks Cohan, it's a Chen Yi plant so I'm not 100% sure of the name...but it's a nice one.


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 17:03

I picked and dispatched 6 lily beetles this morning!  The fiends had already chewed up a clump of asiatics.  For never even having seen one before 2 years ago, this is horrendous!!  And what a shame - asiatic lilies used to be absolutely carefree plants here.


Submitted by Boland on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 17:41

Touch wood...lily beetles have not made it to newfoundland.  They are a major nuisance in Nova Scotia so too close for comfort!


Submitted by RickR on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 19:54

I tried Polyganatum cirrhifolium.  They grew for two summers and survived one winter.  That's all they wrote...

Now if I could just get this one to bloom - Polyganatum verticillatum.  It seems to be happy in dappled shade and a clay-woodland soil.  This is its fourth season.  Any ideas?


Submitted by Peter George on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 20:05

It's rained here almost every day for a week, and I've had difficulty getting outside to weed, let alone take pictures. But today around noon the mist stopped and I got in the garden for a few minutes and took some not really good pictures of some of the things that are blooming. I apologize for the quality, but given the conditions, they'll have to do.
The first one is Eriogonum caespitosa, 3 years old from Alplains seed, and the second is Gentiana acaulis, which has been in the garden for 5 years. Next is Coronilla vaginalis, 4 years from seed, and finally, an Eriogonum I've had for 4 or 5 years, and whose label is long gone.


Submitted by Lori S. on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 20:18

RickR wrote:

Now if I could just get this one to bloom - Polyganatum verticillatum.  It seems to be happy in dappled shade and a clay-woodland soil.  This is its fourth season.  Any ideas?

No idea, Rick.  It took forever for Polygonatum humile to bloom for me.

Great show, Peter!  Gentiana acaulis is always breathtaking, isn't it?

On a positive note (after the lily beetle report  >:(), I moved my Betula apoiensis on Sunday and it is still looking fine.  It was crowding the front of the big acid bed it's in and infringing on the path... moved it back a ways.  So far, so good!


Submitted by cohan on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 22:28

Sorry to hear about the beetles Lori :( There's been talk about them on the yahoo group... one person mentioned she found them in early spring in a bed that had leaf litter or mulch or dead stuff--I forget exactly, but it was some kind of organic material, deliberate or left-over (I think it was the latter).. 'clean' beds didn't seem to be as/hospitable for overwintering....


Submitted by cohan on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 23:05

This little gem is so dark its hard to see it in the pot! Planted in a gallon pot from a piece of root-thanks Stephenb!- late last fall.. so it has survived one winter, and looking great!
Taraxacum 'faroense' which is presumably T rubifolium

Its only maybe 3 inches across, most of these leaves are new this spring, and it seems to have a bud coming, we'll see..I'd rather it didn't have regular dandelion colour flowers--it does--but the foliage makes it worthwhile... I wonder if it will stay this dark all year? Hope so....
Anyone know what sort of moisture this sp likes? Faroes look pretty wet to me....


Submitted by Barstow on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 02:33

Good to see that it has made it! Even though it has standard coloured flowers, the contrast against the dark leaves is very nice!

Although the Plant List doesn't note a Taraxacum faroense or faeroense, the Botanical Society of the British Isles  does note a species with the latter name and it is fairly widespread in the UK: http://www.bsbimaps.org.uk/atlas/map_page.php?spid=3847.0&sppname=Taraxacum faeroense&commname=A dandelion

I've not been successful in finding a picture of faeroense in the wild, but one reference refers to it "as distinctive in its blanket bog habitat, leaf form and colour" (so if this is the what we have, it certainly doesn't mind damp conditions!). On the other hand rubifolium isn't noted from the UK, but I've seen pictures of a plant with this name taken in the wild in the Faroe Islands (it looks the same), but no other reference to where it is found in the wild. I would conclude that it is a synonym and that faeroense is accepted as correct in the UK.... Neither are mentioned in the Flora of North America.


Submitted by Mark McD on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 04:55

Just some quick links relative to Taraxacum, and Taraxacum faeroense Dahlst. 1926 in particular:

T. rubrifolium
http://www.flickr.com/photos/31788134@N04/4656690003/

The Flora of Derbyshire entry (no image)
http://www.derby.gov.uk/dccwebdev/museum/flora/flora.aspx?SpeciesID=1873

Listed in the Interactive Flora of NW Europe
http://ip30.eti.uva.nl/BIS/flora.php?selected=beschrijving&menuentry=soo...
A Shetland endemic, habitat:
Native; damp or wet acidic grassy places, often in upland areas, also roadsides etc..

Map:
http://wbrc.org.uk/WORCRECD/Issue%2020/taraxacum_maps_3.htm

of interest:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faroe_Islands


Submitted by Anne Spiegel on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 07:14

The crevice garden continues to be a delight and plants do seem to like it very much.  Just a few pictures from what's in bloom now.  It's a constantly changing parade.


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 09:11

cohan wrote:

There's been talk about them on the yahoo group... one person mentioned she found them in early spring in a bed that had leaf litter or mulch or dead stuff--I forget exactly, but it was some kind of organic material, deliberate or left-over (I think it was the latter).. 'clean' beds didn't seem to be as/hospitable for overwintering....

A friend at work who is deeply interested in lilies and hybridizing compiled a fact sheet for the Alberta Regional Lily Society.  Apparently, the adults overwinter in soil or in organic debris.  He compiled reports last year - apparently, they have started to occur all over the city.


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 10:46

Fortunately I have no problem with the lily beetle at home. However at my summerhouse it is devastating :(

All I want for my birthday is some crevices to fill with plants ;D


Submitted by Hoy on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 11:04

RickR wrote:

I tried Polyganatum cirrhifolium.  They grew for two summers and survived one winter.  That's all they wrote...

Now if I could just get this one to bloom - Polyganatum verticillatum.  It seems to be happy in dappled shade and a clay-woodland soil.  This is its fourth season.  Any ideas?

I do grow verticillatum. I collected a piece of the rhizome of a winter cold inland site in E Norway. It flowers sparse but regularly. Seems the outmost plants in the clump produce more flowers. They naturally grow in rather moist (but not wet) soil and tolerate heavy shade.


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 11:18

Spiegel wrote:

...It's a constantly changing parade.

And an absolutely delightful one, Anne!

A clump of Tulipa urumiensis that has been given new life by the removal of a 14'W x 8' T sweetberry honeysuckle (Lonicera caerulea)... funny, when this honeysuckle was introduced around here, it was said to get to 3'x3'!  This is where the tufa bed extension will go, so the tulips (and anything else worth saving) will get moved soon too.
 

Gentiana verna... my camera (claimed to be pretty good for its type, I gather, but IMO, lousy at focusing and colour capture) can't show the true colour, a much darker blue.  Nice how the petals unwind.

Taraxacum albopseudoroseum - not delicate; this one wintered over as an evergreen, and bloomed last year in its first year from seed.

Veronica bombycina ssp. bolkardaghensis:
 

Looks like I might, after many years, get a flower on Clematis hirsutissima!  (It never looks much better than this... just one feathery sprig sticking up.)

Primula 'Jay Jay'... I think I'd best propagate/rejuvenate all my old primroses - many are declining.
 

Fritillaria meleagris - the hole in the petal is probably from hail (quite a hailstorm a while ago and a bit last night in the rain)... not from lily beetles!


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 12:48

Skulski wrote:

cohan wrote:

There's been talk about them on the yahoo group... one person mentioned she found them in early spring in a bed that had leaf litter or mulch or dead stuff--I forget exactly, but it was some kind of organic material, deliberate or left-over (I think it was the latter).. 'clean' beds didn't seem to be as/hospitable for overwintering....

A friend at work who is deeply interested in lilies and hybridizing compiled a fact sheet for the Alberta Regional Lily Society.  Apparently, the adults overwinter in soil or in organic debris.  He compiled reports last year - apparently, they have started to occur all over the city.

Makes me think I should stick to buying seed and not live plants (not buying any lilies, but I presume they could be in the soil of other plants? could they be hidden in summer, or if you bought a plant would they have to be visible on above ground plant parts?).. I don't have any number of lilies at risk, but I worry about introducing them to native lily relatives.... At this point, I really do nothing with or about insects outdoors--for the most part, the natural fauna seems to be in balance...


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 12:54

Thanks for input Stephen and Mark; I've seen some of those images before.. Faroes look lovely.. sounds like I should keep it well watered. Stephen, is yours in ordinary garden conditions, or...?

Lori, did you mean T pseudoroseum? I had seedlings last fall, not yet sure if they are coming back --there are dandelion seedlings in that pot, but all very small, so I'm not yet sure if there are any overwinterers, new germination, or just 'wild' stuff seeded in.... Your success is encouraging, but still not sure of its survival...


Submitted by Tim Ingram on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 13:13

Quote: Looks like I might, after many years, get a flower on Clematis hirsutissima!  (It never looks much better than this... just one feathery sprig sticking up.)

How many years? I have this in my sand bed and it grows really well but has never flowered. I put it down to not getting hot enough summers and maybe cold enough winters, but perhaps i just need to be more patient. Clematis tenuiloba in the same bed does flower but not brilliantly. I wish I could grow the Veronica. I've tried it from seed but it hasn't kept going too long. Some of those Turkish species are exquisite


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 13:14

cohan wrote:

Lori, did you mean T pseudoroseum?

Yes, thanks!  My iPhoto is currently disconnected from my huge photo gallery... grrr.  I usually go back and copy names over, but I just winged it on that one, and got it wrong.  


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 13:34

Tim, I've had that C. hirsutissima for about 5-6 years, and I bought it so it must have been at least 2-3 years old.  A couple of these choice low clematis do splendidly at Rundle Wood Garden here in Calgary; I think they get much more sun-baking where they are positioned there than this one of mine.

Ranunculus eschscholtzii, starting to bloom.  I like the very glossy foliage... although I much prefer to see them in the wild here.   :)

Androsace chamaejasme... ditto!

And one from the aquatic world, water hawthorn, Aponogeton distachyos - one of the most bizarre flowers I've ever seen.

Didymophysa vesicaria... I think there is a misspelling there.  Anyone know what it really is?  (Again, I think I figured it out last year... but can't get at my photo records!)  I figured it out.  Correction:  It's probably Braya linearis.


Submitted by Weiser on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 19:22

Yes it's Eriogonum caespitosum. This particular plant is an oddball since it's flowering stems are
4-6 inches long. Normal plants display their flowers just above the foliage. I found it growing in a normally proportioned population.  

Here are some close ups.


Submitted by Lori S. on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 20:42

Thanks for the close-ups! It's gorgeous!  
There are so many plants, I don't know where to start asking for names.  Out of curiosity, what is the low grass-substitute (I assume) in the second photo?

Dianthus myrtinervius ssp. caespitosus looks like it will put on a good show this year; the winter of 2009-2010 was hard on it, and about 1/3 of died, but it seems to have recovered its vigour.


Submitted by cohan on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 21:16

I have some seed of C hirsutissima, which I may have sown to late for full stratification--then again, if it needs warm cold warm, even later  ;D
Anyway, from all the comments here and on SRGC recently, (someone waited 9 years from seed for flowers).. I'm starting to wonder if its worth worrying about.. (may take so long, no point giving it any thought!) plus, if it needs baking, it prob wont be happy here! I got it from someone in Saskatchewan.. wonder how long his took to flower...


Submitted by Weiser on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 21:20

Skulski wrote:

Thanks for the close-ups! It's gorgeous!  
There are so many plants, I don't know where to start asking for names.  Out of curiosity, what is the low grass-substitute (I assume) in the second photo?

The Green grass substitutes are a mix of Thyme species. I think about six varieties . The gray creeper you see in the upper portion is Raoulia australis. The lawn forms a circle around a sand stone patio. On the north and west sides of the lawn are five species of  Antennaria  forming a silvery lawn.


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 22:10

Gee, this thread has certainly come alive lately!  And with a plethora of worthy plants and photographs!

My excuse for posting is that we need more "common" plants:

        Podophyllum hexandrum

             

         Primula polyneura

             

         Astrantia major 'Sunningdale Gold'

             


Submitted by RickR on Fri, 05/20/2011 - 22:30

    Iris reichenbachii and Draba rigida var. bryoides

             

Not all species hybrids are keepers.  This one is a chance hybrid of
Veronica rupestris 'Heavenly Blue' and Veronica gentianoides.  It's about 4 inches tall.

             


Submitted by cohan on Sat, 05/21/2011 - 00:24

Fantastic stuff, John! Do you water much of your garden? I'm quite sure you've told me before, but I forget...
I love Antennarias, and grow some local natives and not quite locals as well--a couple in the rock garden, and some grow around the yard as well.. outside of a constantly weeded rock garden, I'd never be able to keep them totally free of taller plants, but they still form nice mats, the locals at least tolerating shade as well...

Rick--nice Iris, in particular :)


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 05/21/2011 - 00:59

Weiser wrote:

I took a stroll through my garden yesterday.

John, a stroll in your garden would take a very, very long time :o :D  :o :D


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 05/21/2011 - 01:09

RickR wrote:

Gee, this thread has certainly come alive lately!  And with a plethora of worthy plants and photographs!

My excuse for posting is that we need more "common" plants:

Rick, I support your first statement :o And your second statement too, however what is common one place isn't necessarily common another place! Furthermore a nice picture of a "common" plant is always worth its space.


Submitted by Hoy on Sat, 05/21/2011 - 06:20

Overcast today and I am working on a wall but had time to a little stroll in the garden.

I have planted several anemones, here are two. The labels say demissa and palmata but that is wrong. In the background