What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Don't know why it didn't attach, sorry.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

It would be wonderful to have real stone sinks!  I imagine shipping it home was a bit of a feat, or did you find it locally?
Wow, the Berkshire troughs sound amazing - even empty, ours weigh a ton.  
Hey, you can't post a photo of a beautiful trough without telling us what's planted in it!   :o  :D

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

The stone sink (will try to remember to photograph it tomorrow) was part of a display the year the Philadelphia Flower Show had Ireland as a theme.  I talked to the fellow who made the display and we had a meeting of the mind and the trough became mine.  It was a birthday, Christmas and everything gift to myself for a few years!
The plants in the trough pictured include:  Daphne x hendersonii 'Ernst Hauser', Astragalus purshii, Oxytropis sp (grown from seed as an astragalus and never could identify it), Aquilegia jonesii, Penstemon thompsoniae desperatus, Douglasia nivalis, Phlox pungens, Phlox sp, Lewisia brachycalyx,  Paronychia sessiliflora, et al.  The trough is almost 4' long and it's 18" deep in the interior.  Everything loves this trough and I'm convinced it's the depth.  It full sun until late in the afternoon.

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Interesting to see and hear about the various troughs, looking forward to the pic of the stone one!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Somebody has to start a separate trough thread :o Or does it exist already? Then make two: What does my trough look like now! and How I make my troughs ;)

I am collecting ideas for my own trough(s) ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

That's a great idea - we are only just getting more seriously into growing plants in troughs, and Anne's example (and the plants in it) is wonderful. I am especially interested in trying more ericaceous species this way, which don't do well in the garden but could be much better located and looked after in troughs. There are interesting examples in old AGS Bulletins, including edging paving slabs with rocks and actually cementing rocks together to make containers!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Tim, that's the great thing about troughs.  You can make a specialized mix that will keep certain plants happy.  That's really difficult to do in the garden if what the plant needs is contrary to your natural soil conditions.  I like to group plants that need similar soil, water, and exposure.  The only other qualification is that they are plants that really please me and that I want to grow.  It's rare that I'm able to water troughs so most of mine feature dryland plants.

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

Goat Plant! I found this Prenanthes-like plant in the Magdellena Mountains but it varies widely in the Southwest. Its foliage smells decidedly like billy-goat, so; Goat Plant it is. I clip the 25 cm stems back in fall and each time there is hard frost this interesting winged pattern appears on the stems. The next photo is a view from east to west along the spine of the Great Cordillera. from a recent spreading of shale back to the white garden is some 70 feet or so.

   

R. 'Ken Janek' and 'Springwood White' Erica are two plants that will be fantastic come spring but only if the winter is kind.

   

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Funny how even a dead looking prenanthes like plant can be interesting - and not even in relation to the aforementioned winged patterned frost (which is fascinating): I assume the leaf blades senesced, fell off and blew away, while the petioles dried and remained...
I don't think I have ever seen that on a herbaceous plant before.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice views, Michael! As a bit of a composite aficionado, I'd love to see a photo of the goat plant in growth/flower if you have one..

This time of year, its just exciting to see bare earth/rock, so the cordilleran view is nice too  ;D When you mention spreading shale- do you regularly re-top the area?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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