What do you see on your garden walks?

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04
What do you see on your garden walks?

Here is some of what I saw on a stroll today, after work.

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Boy, John, your garden looks terrific right now: I'd sure love to visit again.

Although not really MY garden, I will post three pictures I took yesterday at Denver Botanic Gardens of Plantasia Steppe, the South African Plaza, and Dryland Mesa

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

PK
Thank you so much for your kind compliment.
It's been very cool to cold around here. With a little warmth it should explode, with color. I will keep an eye on it and post more shots later.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

OK I call you John?

Your garden is very nice! I would love to take a stroll in your garden and study plants on close encounter if possible. My garden is very untidy and quite different from yours. Here are some shots I took this afternoon.
The first is from my front door.

Apart from some 30 rhodos I have not many plants in flower for the moment - or rather they are dispersed all over my property.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Trond

So lush and green. That is one color we don't have enough of around here. Lots more of the Gray tones. Do I spy a couple of Yuccas by the steps in the first photo???  :-\  I must say your woodland with the Rhododendrons is very natural appearing and that woodland slope is assume!!

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Weiser wrote:

Trond

So lush and green. That is one color we don't have enough of around here. Lots more of the Gray tones. Do I spy a couple of Yuccas by the steps in the first photo???  :-\  I must say your woodland with the Rhododendrons is very natural appearing and that woodland slope is assume!!

Lush and green are the right words! Even my house become green due to green algae so I (or my wife really) wash it every second or third year! Moss grows everywhere and other plants like grasses germinate where they shouldn't.

But I have to disappoint you  - it is not Yuccas but Cordylines (C. australis 'purpurea'). They stand in pots because I have to move them indoors in the worst winter days. It is also two New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax) there. They are hardy here but stand in pots too.

My garden is steep and difficult to access with heavy tools so I have to carry what is needed. The vegetation is mostly natural but I put in plants I think fit there like the big Skunk Cabbages in the background.

I have a couple of Yuccas (Y. filamentosa) though but they don't flower for me. I haven't found the right site then for they flower in other gardens.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

OMG!  Such greenery!  I'm still waiting for the trees to leaf here!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

June 26, 2010
Photographed in the garden this morning.
1. Daphne velenovskyi 'Balkan Rose'
2. Daphne sp (label indecipherable)
3. Daphne (planted in natural rock crevice and regularly pruned by deer)

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

And more .......

1. Zinnia grandiflora
2. Paederota bonarota setting seed
3. Onosma albo-rosea with left-over seedheads
4. Tufa cliff in Irish stone trough
5. Acantholimon sp finishing bloom
6. mystery grown from seed and not what the seed pack said!  I.D. please
sorry, 5 and 6 interchanged

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Your mystery plant is Pterocephalus: I will let you check my three pix and choose the one you think. They are notoriously bad germinators from seed, incidentally...

I am very fond of these, and am very anxious to obtain their cousin, Pterocephalus spathulatus, from Spain where I trod upon it one October by the acre in the Sierra Cazorla. It has powerdery white leaves and stunning pink flowers for contrast...and NEEDS to be in my garden...

The first is P. depressus from Morocco (the easiest in my experience, blooming all summer)
P. parnassii (or P. perennis v. parnassii) from Greece and the last P. pinardii from Turkey.

The genus is much larger, including taller, coarse herbs from Eurasia that I have not hitherto succeeded in overwintering.

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Pterocephalus spathulatus caught Dwight Ripley's eye too; "... heads of rose-colored flowers sit almost stemless on the wide, chalk-pale cushions .."
There's been an empty space in my garden for this plant, ever since I read that description.

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

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