What do you see on your garden walks?

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Nold wrote:

Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina wanders from its home, it doesn't spread. It leaves its original location for better pastures.

Well, that sounds better than, say, "rampantly invasive"... Okay, I'll leave it where it is for now, though it will be interesting to see how far it has to go to find better pastures in my little plant gulag.   ;D

RickR wrote:

At six feet tall, it's a good thing Impatiens glandulosa alba has terminal flowers!

Yeah, works for me but I wonder if short people would agree?  ???  :D  
Nice to see some of your garden, Rick.

A few in bloom from seed this year:
1) Asperula boissieri - seems to be a form with rather curly foliage.  From Pavelka: "2200m, Killini Mts., Greece; very dwarf compact silvery-grey cushions; stemless pale to dark rose flowers; limestone rocky slopes, 2006 seed."
2) Silene macrantha, or so it was said to be - it's supposed to have greenish-yellow flowers, however.  Big flowers on a tiny plant, anyway.  (Pavelka: "2000m, Komovi, Montenegro; small tufted plant, 5-15cm, pale green leaves; greenish-yellow flowers, stoney slopes; 2005 seed.")  
3) Arabis androsacea - wonderful furry rosettes, flowers nothing much to write home about yet.  (Seeds from Holubec: "ex. Turkey: Ala Dag, 2200m, limestone scree; small cushions, white hairy rosettes, white flowers on 4cm long stems; 2009 seed."

And:
4) Eryngium alpinum
5) DH's mislabelled rose, that could not have been further from what it was supposed to have been... but sort of appealing.
6) In DH's greenhouse ponds, Nymphaea 'Madame Ganna Walska'
7) Nymphaea 'Helvola'
8 ) Azorella trifurcata, or so it seems from the yellow umbels (vs. greenish-white, apparently, on Bolax gummifera?)
9) Another Inula rhizocephala
10 ) Just a garden shot

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

[quote author=RickR link=topic=274.msg3515#msg3515 date=1280511815]
Allium stellatum from seed from a native stand about 50 miles west of me in Minnesota.  For a wild onion, the bulbs are surprisingly tasty!

Campanula americana.  Just ending bloom to the right is Digitalis ferruginea.
[/quote
I didn't notice this post while I commented the Impatiens pictures! Both the Allium and the Campanula are new to me. Are the C. americana perennial? Seems to be plants to try here.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Really enjoyed the pix of your garden, Lori: you have created a stunner there! Love to visit it some time...

PK

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori, do you ever have the heart to leave your garden except for short walks in the mountains?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Lori. your garden is beautiful, and you grow such interesting plants.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Trond, Campanula americana is a biennial, and in many (if not most) gardens a notorious self seeder.  I try not to allow to much seed production.  Most people don't think of it as garden worthy, I don't think. I have found that the plants can be susceptible to a wilt disease.  I know verticillium is present in my land, so I assume it is that. 

Allium stellatum is quite vigorous, and also a vigorous self seeder too, but it is easily prevented but cutting the stalks.  The bicolor umbels, with white buds opening to lavender remind me of fireworks.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thank you for the compliments!  The great thing about photos and posting to remote sites like this, is that no one sees the really ratty parts of the garden.  ;D ;D

And, making another appeal... I'm posting all this stuff, not strictly for compliment-fishing (although I must say that that is very nice  ;D ;D), as in the hopes of encouraging other, so-far silent, members to feel free to share a running journal of their alpines, and gardens in general.  I'm sure we'd all love to see what grows in different areas, and conditions, at different times through the season... (Hey, I need some ideas, too, for my future plantings!)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Arrived home after 5 weeks vaccation. Met by a real wilderness. Have to mow and cut my way through the woodland.
These are not the worst:
The creeping Acaena ovalifolia have grown 3-4ft and cover the path.
Alstroemeria aurea have gotten 3 ft tall and fall over and block the path.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Interesting to see those plants flourishing!  The best I've ever done with Acaena was to have tiny bits survive the winter.  Are the seedpods as painful to step on as they look to be?
I imagine your Alstroemeria are perennial there too... another mind-bending concept for those in this zone!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Interesting to see those plants flourishing!  The best I've ever done with Acaena was to have tiny bits survive the winter.  Are the seedpods as painful to step on as they look to be?
I imagine your Alstroemeria are perennial there too... another mind-bending concept for those in this zone!

The burs are fortunately soft to trample on even with bare feet. And yes, the Alstroemeria aurea is a a hardy perennial here spreading slowly with underground rhizomes.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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