What do you see on your garden walks?

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very nice, Rick!  What else do you have in bloom?

Hoy wrote:

How tall does Delphinium brunonianum get?

My plants are only in their second year now.  The one shown is in regular soil and is 50cm tall... I imagine they may be more restrained in a rock garden setting?  Can anyone else comment?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hoy wrote:

You too do grow houseleeks?

Yes, sempervivums are extremely hardy and very easy to grow here, and therefore very commonly grown.  They do look best growing in rock, though, rather than in regular soil (in which they are quite happy nonetheless).

Hoy wrote:

Why the name "police car moth", does the color resemble that of a police car? Here we have seen lots of butterflies the last days, but only common ones as far as I can tell.

Yes, police cars used to be black with white doors, hence the common name!  (It is no longer the standard colour scheme, though.)  This is a really poor area for butterflies and moths, and for insects in general - we see vastly more in the mountains than we do at home, despite having a yard full of bloom throughout the season.  (We see so few butterflies/moths that we run and tell each other when we do see one!   ::))  A couple of years ago, there was an irruption of Painted Lady butterflies, which was wonderful to see!

Hoy wrote:

Do you have a pond too? I have built one but it is too narrow for waterlilies. I tried but no success - leaves and flowers in a heap. yours are nice.

Thanks!  Growing water lilies is one of my husband's interests.  We have no outdoor ponds, as it's too cool here for even hardy water lilies to do well (I mean for them to be able to act like the flower machines that they should be, in suitable conditions) - just seasonal above-ground ponds in the greenhouse, where the water can be kept constantly warm (with the help of some heaters, when necessary).  Hordes of various tropical fish also enjoy their summers out in the ponds.    

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks Lori.

We had black and white police cars before too!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Iris sintenisii ssp. brandzae, but in May!  (Spring was 3-4 weeks early for us in Minnesota this year.)

Rick, what sun/soil conditions did you give Iris sintenisii ssp. brandzae?  I have seedlings coming along that I planted in the partial shade of very-late-to-leaf-out Chionanthus virginicus, but it's a dryish spot, and the mid-day to afternoon sun does cook the spot, although been hitting up the seedlings with the watering can almost daily, and they're growing and look fine so far.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

McDonough wrote:

So, I was checking into Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina, and couldn't find it initially... what's going on I ask?  Seems that S. nana and S. sapphirina are now two separate species, but initially using the USDA pages

Well, the USDA thinks that Penstemon unilateralis is a valid name for Penstemon virgatus ssp. asa-grayi, which, as far as I know, no authority on the genus accepts, so .....
Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina wanders from its home, it doesn't spread. It leaves its original location for better pastures. S. brittonii and S. angustifolia, on the other hand, spread as fast as a rumor. These last two do have the decency to disappear for the summer, and, if you look at them from a cosmic perspective (like comparing them to the speed at which Veronica oltensis takes over everything in sight), they are fairly slow.

"Forgive the lateness of my reply."

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Nold wrote:

Well, the USDA thinks that Penstemon unilateralis is a valid name for Penstemon virgatus ssp. asa-grayi, which, as far as I know, no authority on the genus accepts, so .....
Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina wanders from its home, it doesn't spread. It leaves its original location for better pastures. S. brittonii and S. angustifolia, on the other hand, spread as fast as a rumor. These last two do have the decency to disappear for the summer, and, if you look at them from a cosmic perspective (like comparing them to the speed at which Veronica oltensis takes over everything in sight), they are fairly slow.

"Forgive the lateness of my reply."

Bob, the description of Scutellaria nana var. sapphirina as "wandering from its home" versus "spreading" is a useful-to-know nuance of it's growing habit... wish I still had it (Lori, are you listening, grow this plant on someplace, and keep it going, it's a dwarf cutie).

I'm also arriving at a point of assessing certain aggressive spreading tendencies, and with a small plant like Scutellaria angustifolia, and the fact it goes completely dormant and disappears shortly after flowering, one can make greater allowances for its spread when it is non-threatening to other more substantive plants.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Impatiens glandulosa alba
Also in pic
Impatiens balfourii (at base of I. gland.)
Aralia occidentalis (rear left) I've been having to keep it trimmed back so it does take over.  At four years old from seed, it grows larger than Aralia cordata var. sacchalinensis.  It will be replanted in the yard next spring.
Fargesia rufa (partial pic, far right) proving to be a very worth bamboo for my cold climate.
Allium stellatum (bottom left)

Second photo: Basal stem, Impatiens glandulosa alba

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

At six feet tall, it's a good thing Impatiens glandulosa alba has terminal flowers!

Gosh, I wonder how tall it would get if I didn't have dry soil?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Allium stellatum from seed from a native stand about 50 miles west of me in Minnesota.  For a wild onion, the bulbs are surprisingly tasty!

Campanula americana.  Just ending bloom to the right is Digitalis ferruginea.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

At six feet tall, it's a good thing Impatiens glandulosa alba has terminal flowers!

Gosh, I wonder how tall it would get if I didn't have dry soil?

They can grow a little taller! I have different color forms of I. glandulosa and they sow themselves all over my place. Have to mow them. I let some grow and the tallest reach about 3m. When I come home in a week I can show you pics.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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