What do you see on your garden walks?

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very pretty!  Do I see Campanula rotundifolia in there too?  I had to look up "gean" -wild cherry?  (Not a familiar term for me - nice to learn things!)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Very pretty!  Do I see Campanula rotundifolia in there too?  I had to look up "gean" -wild cherry?  (Not a familiar term for me - nice to learn things!)

Yes, you do; and yes, that's right! (The Norwegian name is fuglebær - "bird-berry".)

Here are the harebell, and a spruce to show that they also creep in the lowlands!

The island's name is Jomfruland = Virgin land.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I'm not sure of the white flower above - is it Daucus carota?

Just spent the evening "controlling" the virtual plague of self-seeded delphiniums out front, and moving other plants in front of them to hide their tatty, yellow lowermost leaves... mission accomplished, for a while, I hope.  There was a casualty though... I broke the top off an Eremurus... grrr!
A few things from the yard, some alpine-ish...
1) Phyteuma nigrum, done flowering now.
2) Stachys discolor
3) A stem of Lilium martagon 'Album', with Lupinus argenteus in the background
4) Allium obliquum
5) Scutellaria baicalensis, from seed last year... very interesting flowers and buds
6) Phyteuma scheuchzeri
7, 8 ) A long-time favourite plant, Linum flavum 'Compactum'
9, 10) An extremely hardy (at least zone 2) and elegant plant from the Caucasus, Echium russicum

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The white flowers are a carrot lookalike: Pimpinella saxifraga (and the blue grass is Leymus arenarius).

Nice clump of Phyteuma nigra! I sowed this species many years ago and it lowered this spring for the first time!

I have other Phyteuma but never seen discolor, seems to be a fine plant.
My Lilium martagon have all grown small and nonflowering!
It seems that the Onion Man is not the only one growing Allium! I am at the lookout for new species to try here - they have to be summer-flowering and able to cope with very dry periods.
Scutellaria baicalensis have I tried from seed several times but never had any success.
Another nice Phyteuma! We have one native Phyteuma in Norway, P. spicatum, but I have never seen it in the wild.
Longtime favored Linum you say, how long? My perennial Linums never live more than a couple of years! Have not tried this one, however.
Is Echium russicum perennial? Our local Echium, E. vulgare (a very pretty plant by the way) is biennial.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

I grow two grasses in my dry-land garden that add light and movement to my plantings.

The first is my favorite, Indian Rice Grass - Achnatherum hymenoides (syn. Oryzopsis hymenoides, Stipa hymenoides) A moderately sized (6-12 inches) western bunch grass with airy, light refracting inflorescence.

The second is a taller (18-24inch) drought tolerant bunch grass. Mexican Feather Grass - Stipa tenuissima (syn. Nassella tenuissima). For soft flowing movement at the slightest breeze it is hard to beat.

I use these two grasses as companions for an assortment of western prairie natives.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I like your grasses, Weiser!
Can't you open a new thread on grasses?
By the way, do you collect seed of any of your plants?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Scutellaria baicalensis ... I wonder what I have that is supposed to be baicalensis?  It's scads different.  Mine bloomed in a pot rather than in ground, but still...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Scutellaria baicalensis ... I wonder what I have that is supposed to be baicalensis?  It's scads different.  Mine bloomed in a pot rather than in ground, but still...

Rick, it does look scads different than Lori's plant... but will  the  real  Scutellaria  baicalensis  please  stand  up?  Googling, one finds scads of herbal sites, many of which seem to use any ol' Scutellaria plant photo... it doesn't matter in their drug/herbal world, so those should be largely ignored.  

The species is named for Lake Baikal, an area in Russian Siberia.  Googling, one learns about this fascinating area, Asia's largest lake, and the world's deepest lake.  This species is also found in China; Flora of China says "traditionally used as a febrifuge, for relieving fever... this is one of the most commonly collected species in China.".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Baikal

I gathered up a few photo links, not sure who's got what, but all these upright "scoots" are a hoot to grow, I like em.

Flora of China drawing and species description:
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=3315&flora_id=2
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200020285

More photo/info links:
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/po...

http://www.funet.fi/pub/sci/bio/life/plants/magnoliophyta/magnoliophytin...

http://www.rmrp.com/Images/Plants/S/Scuttelaria%20baicalensis%20100DPI.jpg

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Scutellaria baicalensis ... I wonder what I have that is supposed to be baicalensis?  It's scads different.  Mine bloomed in a pot rather than in ground, but still...

I don't know which plant is the real thing - yours or Lori's or both!
Yours seems to be a pretty plant anyway, Rick!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Rick, the differences between our supposed Scutellaria baicalensis seems to be the flower arrangement on the stem - multiples, apparently, on yours and on the UBC photo plant; only orderly pairs on mine - and also that mine has a narrower lower lip.  No comment on the flower arrangement on the eFlora of China site though, unfortunately.  (Thanks for all the research, Mark!)  Mine seems to be the oddball.  I was sent seeds for it in a trade last year - interesting plant anyway, but strangely different from yours.  I think mine is something else again...

Trond, Linum flavum 'Compactum' is a long-lived perennial for me.  Echium russicum is completely perennial here too.

John, I wish those grasses were hardy here but no such luck!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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