Photo of the Day 1/15/2016

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paulhschneider
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-20
Photo of the Day 1/15/2016

Plantago maritima- Sea Plantain- growing from a crack in a sheer rock cliff- Cuslett, Placentia Bay, Newfoundland CA 7/2015

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, great setting, Paul!

 

Here's one from our mountains, one of those darned confusing but so beautiful alpine cinquefoils, Potentilla uniflora(?):

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

paulhschneider
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-20

Having trouble bringing up pics. Lets try again. Sorry Pic on left Potentilla anserina- Silverweed. on right: Potentilla tridentata -Three toothed Cinquefoil -now Sibbaldiopsis. Both shot in Newfoundland on vacation 7/2015 P. tridentata is  growing through the asphalt of one of the runways onthe old US Navy Base, Argentia, Nfld

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Great photos!  That reminds me that I haven't seen Potentilla anserina (now Argentina anserina) in a very long time.  

That Sibbaldiopsis tridentata is spectacular!  I planted the selection 'Nuuk' many years ago but it didn't retain a "clumping" form - instead it spread out loosely, very quickly.  Probably not very favourable conditions for it, I suppose.

 

One of my favourites - though it takes a sharp eye to even pick out these tiny cuties - Silene uralensis ssp. attenuatus:

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

paulhschneider
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-20

Lori, I was stationed at the US Navy Base in Argentia, NFld from June '64 through Jan '67. My wife of 49 years is from  Newfoundland. The Sibbaldiopsis tridentata is incredible on the old base. It is literally dissolving the asphalt( Macadam) of all the old base runways.  Talk about a hostile environment.  In July, the runways are great for "birding" with large populations of whimbrels (Numenius phaeopus) Skittish buggers that are hard to  photograph.

Photo on the left is looking north in Placentia Bay from the conifer woods above the old US Navy Base Argentia NFLD

Photo on the right is Diapensia lapponica at Cape St. Mary's, Bird Sanctuary, Placentia Bay, NFLD- photo ID thanks to our own Todd Boland

View North in Placentia Bay  from the conifer woods on the old US Navy Base
Diapensia lapponica at Cape St. Mary's , Placentia Bay NFLD
Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Nice pics!  In the photo on the left, are the trees stunted by harsh conditions (e.g. kruppelholz?)  The Diapensia lapponica is gorgeous.

Re. the Sibbaldiopsis growing up through the old asphalt, I wonder if it favours the extra warmth that the black surface would provide?  Life colonizes wherever it can - it's impressive to see plants reclaiming developed areas.  I'm always amazed to see fungi, which I tend to think of as rather soft and yielding, growing up through asphalt on the edges of roads and elsewhere.

 

Pulsatilla ambigua

     

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

paulhschneider
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-20

Lori, In the photo on the left, I was on a road looking down over the conifers so they were actually quite large. Generally speaking , the coastal conifers in Newfoundland tend to be dwarfed in varying degrees depending on how exposed they are to the elements.

Photos attached show a Larix laricina ( about 24" tall) growing in a wide open  bog. It could easily be many years of age.

                                       Bog where  the Larix was growing.

                                       Rubus chamaemorus- Cloudberry (known as Bakeapples in NFLD & famous as a source for jam) growing in the bog

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Great pictures!  I guess the bakeapples must grow a lot more densely in some areas, given that they're picked for cooking?  (Would certainly be arduous picking, if not!  Probably pretty arduous anyway, I'd imagine.)

Lactuca intricata, from seed in 2012 which germinated after 5 days at room temperature.  Seed was from M. Pavelka, wild-collected in 2009 from Boz Dag, Turkey, at 2000m elevation from dry stoney slopes:

 

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Ranunculus parnassifolius, a beautiful yet undemanding plant in this area:

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

[quote=Lori S.]

Lactuca intricata, from seed in 2012 which germinated after 5 days at room temperature.  Seed was from M. Pavelka, wild-collected in 2009 from Boz Dag, Turkey, at 2000m elevation from dry stoney slopes:

 

[/quote]

Hi Lori,

what an interesting little lettuce! Is it perennial or do you have to keep it going from seed annually?

And the Ranunculus is a delight!

Here's an Aussie native "Blue Devil" - Eryngium ovinum - which we also grow at home but this specimen is in a newly planted section of a garden at work,

Eryngium ovinumEryngium ovinumEryngium ovinum

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hi, Fermi,

The little lettuce is perennial and dies back to the ground each winter (but then, pretty well everything dies back here!)

I would not have imagined there would be an Erygnium that's native to Australia!  Very interesting.

 

Androsace albana, from seed in 2011; seed germinated after cold stratification.  Unfortunately, it is monocarpic but it did manage to shed seed and produce a couple of seedlings.  Nice foliage on this one, best seen in the second photo (over-wintered rosettes in spring).

      

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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