Garden Adversity

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
RickR wrote:
McDonough wrote:

and each year it[Magnolia tripetala] would eventually break off at the heal, but finally this year I have a strong sprout and the tree is already about 10-12 feet tall 

Adventitious buds are never strong at the point of emergence, especially at the get-go.  It grew 10-12 ft in one season? :o  I would assume a single tall whip?

Yes Rick, the sprout grew with remarkable vigor, I think loving the heat and abundant rain.  I still don't know the outcome on this tree, after the morning after the storm I have not been home during daylight to check it out.  There is a single tall main whip, but then more suckers appeared, which i need to remove.

Thanks for your comments Panayoti, I will try to "work with" the remains to see what restorative growth might occur.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

I understand, Mark.  Joe and I would have gone to friends who had power but most of them have cats, and Ranger does not accept cats.  So we stayed with the dog (large german shepherd) and it wasn't too terrible.  We were out of the house most of the day someplace warm.  Thank heavens the power cam on late this afternoon.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The New England version of tuckamores  ;D ;)

I remember once after a series of such storms, one right after another, I built an igloo with blocks of snow cut from my driveway.  It didn't even last the night before it caved in, but for a first try I was quite proud of myself.  In my younger days, toughing out such an "adventure" was labeled fun.  Now, not so much, but it is still an adventure (not that I would ever look forward to it...).

With their sinewy wood quality, one can also add Chamaecyparis (False cypress) to the "rubber tree" list.  This is Chamaecyparis thyoides, in a past season.  A few days later, it too returned to its completely upright position.                  

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Taking no chances here. Picea pungens 'Fastigiata' all tied up for the winter. Taken this morning.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Schier
Schier's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-16

I'm taking no chances here either, although this morning was the first snow, just  a skiff.  Well, I guess I am taking a chance, I have only built a protection forthe Pinus strobus 'pendula' that I planted this spring.  The rest of this years' new shrubsand trees will be on their own.  We don't tend to get as much of the heavy wet stuffin the fall as in the spring.  Then it can be nasty and heartbreaking, so I really feel for you all that were blasted with it. I'm really not very fond of snow- but I do hope that we get some before the temperatures really start to dip, and if it's going to snow, theremay as well be plenty of it - just not so much at once! ( not asking for much, am I ..)

Faith S.   Gardening in central Alberta climate, from min. -44 c to max. 36+ C. ( not often! ) Avg. annual precip. ~ 48 cm  Altitude ~ 820 m. Have "frying pan gardens" up around the house, and also some woodland areas down the pa

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Several years ago I was visiting a country club in Colorado Springs (to show slides) and noticed the columnar conifers were all wrapped with twine. It occurred to me there might be good reason for this and after the blizzard of '03 (or after some other blizzard) the spruce pictured had it branches all askew and they wouldn't grow back upright. I started wrapping it a winter or so after and have had no damage since. So far ....(It wouldn't be such a big deal to me if I hadn't spent so much money on a fastigiate blue spruce. I didn't look at the price tag when I picked it up and by the time I'd gotten to the cash register it was too late.)

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Multitrunked arborvitae dominate the nursery market, a terrible trait for areas with heavy snow as the individual stems can splay apart.  But I have only seen single stemmed trees in the wild.  I have inquired, of learned people, where in the world this trait originates, but no one has been able to tell me.  Has anyone ever seen an arborvitae (Thuja sp.) in the wild that was naturally multistemmed?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

Sorry to hear about this severe weather, the complete reverse of last year. I remember we had snow in October and temperatures had sunk to -10C at this time whilst Mark continued to show his onions in bloom! I was struck by how different our climates were! This year, we're well into November and still not a single frost here and the long-term forecast is the same and all sorts of warmth records are being set! I remember the climatologists forecasting a few years ago that in 50 years we wouldn't have frost here until December in some years. Well, we're not going to be far off that prediction already this year! Change is happening faster than we realise... 

Stephen Barstow Malvik, Norway 63.4N Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

youngman54
youngman54's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-11-04

Gee whiz!! I thought we had it bad the last couple of years but nothing like what you guys on the other side of the pond have been getting.I suppose we should be grateful we live on a relatively small island ( UK ) in the Atlantic and have a maritime climate. its been so mild +20 oC / 68f we have narcissus 3" above the ground in November? We have had our 1st frost -1 / 30f so should hopefully slow things down. if it doesn't cool down we will have Narcissus flowers for Xmas.

Will YoungmanComrie Scotland
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Following up on thje damage done to Chionanthus virginicus (Fringe Tree), today was bright and mild, time to do some cleanup.  Most branches were damaged, so the best pruning approach seemed to be to cut it back drastically, hoping that in a few years time with will be able to recover.

Leaving a few long willowy branches didn't make sense, so all was cut back to short solid trunks and severed branch bases.  In the right-hand photo, the red line indicates a cut I made on a large low branch that had split under the weight of snow.

A heap of limbs cut off.  On the right, the finished pruning job. Planted under this tree are many bulbous plants, such as Fritillaries and bulbous Alliums.

I gathered up all the seed, many still hanging on thje branches, like dangling olives, many others gathered up on the ground.  I will sow these. Interestingly, Chionanthus is dioecious, my tree is male, but it has the ability to produce some female flowers and depending on the year, varying quanity of seed set.

And lest we forget, here are some photos of the plant in flower, the flowers richly perfumed scenting a large part of the yard.

Never got a change to see the fall color this year, so here's a view from 2010 (center, yellow leaves), with Oxydendron arboreum (Sourwood Tree) on the right... the latter survived this snowstorm but lost the top 7-8' with 3 leaders snapped off and some other shapely branches.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

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