Fritillaria 2012

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Mark, you have such wonders in your garden!  I love the "sow-in-place" philosophy.F. pudica in nature, with the contrast of snow, is fantastic - the flowers seem to glow.  Excellent photos, John!

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Do you grow anything else with the bulbs Mark? I have a small bed in our lawn which is mainly devoted to bulbs inspired by the bulb walk at Sissinghurst. But it becomes bare in the summer so I have some small later flowering perennials amongst the bulbs. These look pretty special species so I imagine need more space - will be really nice to see how those direct sown colonies develop; I have only done this with snowdrops and it has been very effective.

A few examples on the bulb bed:-

Fritillaria kotschyanaScilla melainaMuscari pseudomuscariFritillaria elwesii

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

John, great photos, and such a compact form, looking very different in growth than mine, beautiful juxtaposed with snow.  I originally got mine as "rice grains" at 10 for $1 from Jane McGary, about 20 rice grains came, quite a bargain and fun to wait 4-5 years to maturity.

I remember finding dwarf plants in full flower in the Wenatchee Mountains, Washington, literally growing in running water (spring snow melt), areas that would be bone dry in a few weeks.  It kept good company, commingling with Olsynium douglasii in various shades of purple and pink.

Tim, many of my bulbs are planted in Hibiscus syriacus "shrub rings", late-to-leaf tap-rooted shrubs that are perfect for underplanting with bulbs. I like the idea of growing small bulbs this way, I enjoy seeing crocus bulk up into floriferous clumps, jumping right out of the soil.  Each year I enlarge the rings a bit to make room for more bulbs and sown-in-place bulb seed ;)  In the summer, when all bulbs are dormant and the dried foliage wisked away, the mulched bed is a simple backdrop for the real focus of the mid-summer to autumn season, the extravaganza of bloom on Hibiscus syriacus (selected single-flowered forms like 'Blue Bird').  A happy combination.

Oh, by the way Tim, Fritillaria elwesii is most elegant the way the flowers are displayed, its been added to my list :)

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Wow John, such healthy and bulked up looking frits!  The color is so vivid!

Tim, your F. elwesii is so artistic: it's like it's not even real...----------------------------Some Fritillaria camschatcensis seedlings, 3 years old I think, are looking nice.  (Once again, I never said I am an attentive grower.)  Seed from the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska.

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have almost given up frits as they are excellent slug food except the common Snake's head. But you guys give me the spur to try again! And Mark, although Hibiscus syriacus do overwinter here it don't like our cool summers so flowers are rare :-\

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I can't claim much credit for the Frit. elwesii; it is actually a potful that came from Jim Archibald's greenhouse when I visited him a few years ago, and so it holds rather a good memory! Kevin Pratt, who co-wrote a book on Fritillarias, describes many species that might grow successfully in the garden and I am trying more and more from seed (like raddeana and eduardii and affinis, which is wonderfully variable and a good doer), but it will be quite a few years before any of these show any flowers. Fortunately (touch wood) we don't suffer badly from slugs, but do have Lily beetle!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

What is the worse - slugs or beetles :-\

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Thank all of you for your kind comments about my photos of the pudica. It won't be long now and they will be hard to spot as their season is nearly over. I usually can spot them out of the corner of my eye. You walk along head bowed scanning the brush and dead cheatgrass, then eureka a flash of yellow, among the drab grays of spring, catches your eye. Always a pleasure to see and smell. They have a sweet fragrance similar to Asiatic lilies but much more muted in it's intensity.

From the High Desert Steppe of the Great Basin and the Eastern Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7 http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/ John P Weiser

bulborum
bulborum's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Slugs are worseoften they cut the flower-stem (one or more years lost)and are more difficult to tracelily-beetles are easy to handleand just eat a piece of the leafs or flowers (before I kill them)     

R

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/518187888211511 Normal Zone <8   -7°C _ -12°C      10 F to +20 F RGB or RBGG means: Roland and Gemma de Boer

externmed
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-03-01

Seems like the red lily beetle larvae may head for the bulb at some stage, and leave nothing.  Al least I've had some (lily) plants totally disappear without an alternative explanation.Charles Swanson MA USA

NE Massachusetts (New England) USA  zone 6 (5B to 6B)

gardens visited, photographs:  www.flickr.com/photos/wildmeadow

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