Alpine experiments

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Alpine experiments

How's this for a long shot? Anisotome latifolia/imbricata?? - bought from Beaver Creek at the CRAGS Plant Sale - very interesting foliage! If it survives, it will need to be moved... but I don't think I'll put any rush on that.... ;D EDIT: And I guess it wouldn't need to be moved after all...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anisotome_latifoliahttp://www.nzpcn.org.nz/flora_details.asp?ID=365

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

That is one of the most stunning alpine umbels - very good luck with it! There is a fine grower down here in Kent, Nigel Fuller, famous for his skill with Dionysias. He also grows the Anisotome beautifully but only in a pot.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

You haven't been to Campbell Island to collect seed of the carrot yourself, Lori?

Campbell Island is a place well worth visiting I think. One of my dreams . . .

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Lori, I know it's a young plant.... but it bears an uncanny resemblence to Anisotome imbricata... which is a super rock garden subject and so would'n't need moving as it's not going to make 2m plus!  :-\

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret) Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Booker
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Joined: 2010-01-30
IMYoung wrote:

Lori, I know it's a young plant.... but it bears an uncanny resemblence to Anisotome imbricata... which is a super rock garden subject and so would'n't need moving as it's not going to make 2m plus!   :-\

I tend to agree with Maggi and Ian ... my only experience of growing Anisotome latifolia produced a plant larger in all it's parts ... a potential megaherb in the making, quite fitting of course for a plant from such a habitat.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus On the moors in Lancashire, U.K. Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Toole
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Joined: 2010-07-02

Here's a couple of shots of Anisotome latifolia in the garden here Lori for comparison.It hasn't flowered yet,probably needs more sun  :-\ .

The 2nd link you gave is of the New Zealand Plant Conservation Network website --a wonderful resource for IDing New Zealanders,(the plants that is ......  ;)  ;D ).

In one of the website's Anisotome pics there is a view also of Bulbinella rossii.My plant is slowly clumping up in shade ---3 flowering stems last November plus a couple of immature ones.

Cheers Dave.  

Invercargill Bottom of the South Island New Zealand Zone 8 maritime climate 1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a. Nil snow cover

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

No, Trond, I only travelled as far as the south-central end of the city to get it...  ;D ... though I certainly would have liked to pick it up from its native land.

Thank you for posting the photos, Dave.  It sounds like an extraordinary plant!  The Bulbinella is exquisite!

Maggi and Cliff, this particular plant certainly does look like A. imbricata (despite the label)... Well, that's even more interesting!  Can anyone else comment on its ID from the photo?  How does one distinguish the two species as immature plants, I wonder?  (I can get better and additional photos if need be.)http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_uYdLH-IM33w/ScCsNgYg4-I/AAAAAAAAGJA/IanwD7Y47E...

By the way, Maggi, you clearly have an encyclopedic memory!!  Amazing! :o :)

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

That's interesting - I just looked at the photo and took no notice of the name! Oh well a rose by any other name should be so sweet!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Dave, that Bulbinella rossi is stunning! do you say it is shade tolerant? How hardy is it?

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03
Skulski wrote:

How's this for a long shot?  Anisotome latifolia - bought from Beaver Creek at the CRAGS Plant Sale - very interesting foliage!  If it survives, it will need to be moved... but I don't think I'll put any rush on that....  ;D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anisotome_latifoliahttp://www.nzpcn.org.nz/flora_details.asp?ID=365

Very interesting! Did Beavercreek give any guideline to hardiness?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I didn't ask, though I imagine advice would have been available.  (I'm used to just trying plants to see what happens - a lot more fun that way!  There is no discouragement from trying anything!)  If I remember, I will ask around.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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