Winter Exposure of Troughs

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03
Winter Exposure of Troughs

This topic was spit from the Alpine Shows and Events 2012. It deserves its own thread.--- Moderator

Trond, there is cold winter weather, and then there is cold winter weather ;) In the middle of our coldest weather (mine is a little worse than Lori's, on average) its hard to believe that any plant or animal can survive! But I think the question here is not about cold alone, but about exposure-- for example, plants that are hardy here can still not usually be left in pots on the surface of the soil over winter, though okay if sunk.. so, does a trough with plantings that extend high above the soil behave like a rock garden (connected to the soil, and so hopefully safe..) or would it be too small and isolated like a pot?I wouldn't try anything valuable in that sort of planting unless I had extras ;D

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Cohan, I know you winters are more sever than mine! However, in the mountains the winters can be rather harsh! We often divide the plants in two groups - the "snowbed plants" that prefere to grow in depressions usually covered by more or less snow during the winter; and "ridge plants" that prefere to grow on ridges etc fully exposed to the weather! I believe that plants from the latter group should tolerate planting in a "minimountain"  ;) Many Saxes belong to this group, and if you like Lori, grow your plants from seed you should have some in surplus to experiment with!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
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Joined: 2011-04-27

I wonder how gardeners in places like Denver get on with many of these plants? It sounds as though snow cover can be erratic over winter and temperatures very much lower than we get. As a gardener I foolishly try to grow a huge range of plants and get away with it to an extent because of our relatively equable climate. But it is a salutary lesson when I hear of gardens elsewhere dropping to -40°C in winter! On the whole though plants are much tougher than we probably give them credit, and its good to experiment like Trond says. We actually have the opposite problem of being too mild and so all the best alpine gardens tend to be up north.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

RickR
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Joined: 2009-09-21
Tim wrote:

On the whole though plants are much tougher than we probably give them credit,

So true!  Even the root hardiness has exceeded well beyond my expectations.  Every year, my potted materials sit in the garage for a period just before they get put to bed outside for the winter.  This is the time while I wait for the ground to get sufficiently frozen to hold my materials frozen through the winter without multiple freeze/thaw cycles.  During this time, there is always at least a few nights down to 0F (-18C) outside, often even less. The garage affords a 10F (5C) moderation in temperature.  Even so, with the few winter potted plant deaths (perhaps 1%) I observe in the spring, I can't be sure that those cold temperatures were the cause.

What I can be sure of is that plants in general (and even their roots) are a lot more cold hardy then normally reported!  (Obviously, many of us have already figured that out.)

This winter, it has been so ridiculously warm that the ground never got cold enough (in my opinion) until mid January.  By then I thought, what would be the point of outside storage.  So they have been in the garage all winter for the first time, and have dried out way more than a usual winter, but with more freeze/thaw cycles.  It will be interesting to compare with my normal overwintering procedure, and see how this affects ensuing growth and survival.

This past weekend for a three day inside event at our arboretum, I brought some relatively good looking alpine plants from my overwintering collection to show.  The lewisia, antennaria, echinocereus, sempervivum, draba, orostachys, iris, saxifrage, sedum, penstemon and pulsatilla all show perky signs of growth and unscathed health.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Trond and Rick- I agree many different factors to hardiness depending on the kind of plant, where it comes from and what it has adapted to in the past..I remember Lori mentioning to me, for example, that she usually does not mulch, and found when she had done so she sometimes ended up with rotted plants.. While there are presumably some other kinds of plants will survive cold better if they are covered by snow or mulch (eg, marginally hardy woodies that routinely freeze back to snow or mulch level)..I expect, in my generally snowier winter than Lori's, that some dryland plants will have an issue here with wet conditions under the snow in spring (now, there is a foot to several feet of snow around, which will take many weeks to melt, during which time I expect the soil surface in many areas will be wet and icy)-- time will tell! I am thinking that one strategy I will use is strongly sloped plantings to let moisture run away to a greater extent; draining soil is of little advantage during the many months that the ground is frozen and no moisture can penetrate!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Anne Spiegel
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Joined: 2010-01-26

Cohan, I think the general rule is that troughs that spend the winter outside should be considered at least 1 zone colder.  Unless you have a trough with tremendously thick walls the roots are exposed far more than when planted and when they have the protection of a lot of soil.  I've lost plants in troughs that sail through winters when planted in the garden.  Since my troughs are integrated throughout the garden, it stand to reason that it's the trough environment itself that's suspect.  I've thought of wrapping them in insulation but haven't tried it yet.  As it is the garden looks awful in the winter, draped as it is with chicken wire over everything to stop the antlered rats from browsing.

cohan
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Sorry Tim-- this whole conversation should have been somewhere else!I think I've seen that guideline before, Anne- of course here, there are only so many zones lower you can find plants ;)I have a large pot- 14x14 inches which I had several Sempervivums (hardy here) and a couple of other things in.. I thought that size might be safe enough, but lost all but one Semp, even though the whole thing was buried in snow for almost the whole winter; since then, I've made sure the pot was in contact with the soil directly (it was on boards at first, and soil contact is supposed to be important) and piled sod around it for winter, and new plantings in it have been fine for a couple of years.. I may try it exposed again once I have the S ciliosum, which survived the first year, backed up elsewhere...

All other pots I have outside are sunk to the rims in soil for winter....

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

We have a member here that has more than a dozen troughs of hypertufa and of styrofoam.  He says he has better winter survival in the styrofoam ones.  That's not surprising, given the insulating qualities inherent with the styro troughs.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Some of my troughs are half-buried in the garden and that has provided a lot of insulation.  I go to great lengths to insure that nothing can get into the troughs through the drainage holes.  Even the ones sitting on stone or blocks are close enough to the ground that it's possible to heap gravel around the base of the trough.  We get a lot of wind here and it keeps the wind from lowering the temperature of the base of the trough even more.

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
RickR wrote:

We have a member here that has more than a dozen troughs of hypertufa and of styrofoam.  He says he has better winter survival in the styrofoam ones.  That's not surprising, given the insulating qualities inherent with the styro troughs.

But don't they freeze from the top? And take longer time to thaw?

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

I have open-ended trough covers on the ones that need it or can't stand winter wet.

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