Photo of the Day 2016

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Fermi
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Joined: 2010-03-03
Photo of the Day 2016

Gloriosa superba is now in flower!

Gloriosa superba Gloriosa superba

It is superb, it is glorious but sadly considered a weed in northern parts of Australia! I've seen it running wild along the foreshore at Noosa in Queensland, but ours were procured from a commercial source in Victoria (where it is not a weed!).

We grow it in large pots so that it can be kept relatively dry during the winter. They also need water during the summer months so are at odds with our climate! The tubers do migrate to the bottom of the pots and out the drainage holes so re-potting is required on an annual or biennial basis. Escapees do not persist in our garden,

cheers

fermi

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A pretty amazing weed (Gloriosa superba), to be sure.  I find it really astounding how fragile and vulnerable warm climates are with respect to invasive species... an awfully pretty thing to look at though!

 

Aquilegia flavescens in Kananaskis Country, AB:

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lori, for a minute there, I thought you were talking about your Aquilegia picture.  Boy was I perplexed!

 

What kind of rock are those beauties growing in?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Ooops, I will go back and clarify the previous comments!  :-)  The Aquilegia flavescens is indeed native and non-invasive - it doesn't even seem to be much in cultivation.  It's growing there among limestone boulders, Rick... lots of limestone in the Rockies here.

I wonder if this is Ranunculus nivalis, seen in Kananaskis Country, AB, at ~2500m elevation?  The sepals are brown on the backsides, as for R. nivalis.

 

 

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It's growing there among limestone boulders

 

I wish we could get limestone that color here....

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

[quote=RickR]

I wish we could get limestone that color here....

[/quote]

The usual range seems to be grey to tan.  What colours are available there, Rick?

 

Love this plant, Achillea ageratifolia:

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

While I do occasionally find light gray tones of limestone in the wild here, they are never accessible, either on public environmentally sensitive lands or just too far from roads to make it at all practical.  Limestone for sale is always a yellow-beige here.

 

Achillea ageratifolia is a hardy fellow.  Back when we had cold winters, it always did well for me in a trough,.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Fermi
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Lycoris incarnata started flowering a week or so ago 

Lycoris incarnata 31-01-16Lycoris incarnata 31-01-16

started to look good a few days later

Lycoris incarnata 2-02-16

A second clump had spikes up about then

Lycoris incarnata spikes 3-02-16 

and is now at peak bloom

Lycoris incarnata 8-02-16Lycoris incarnata 8-02-16

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia Min: -7C, Max: +40C

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The only one I can get to bloom up here in Zone 4 is Lycoris squamigera.  It wants to set seed every year, but of course it never does (being sterile).

  My best clump:

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Rick,

you do better with that one than I do! Even though it's called "Hardy Amaryllis" it has not persisted in our garden - either the frost hits it at a sensitive time or it doesn't like the watering regime!

Here's Rhodophiala bifida, a blood red clone which is quite eye-catching - I'm hoping it bulks up enough to make a spectacular display one yearcheeky

Rhodophiala bifida Rhodophiala bifida

For years I only had one clone (an orangey-red one) and never got any seed but got this a couple of years ago from a friend and have used it to set seed on the other clone - just waiting for the progeny to flower now!

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa, Central Victoria, Australia Min: -7C, Max: +40C

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That L. squamigera is the only plant I have that I semi regularly need to protect from spring frost (about every 3 years).  Despite it's deep planting it comes up at the same time as the Corydalis solida!  I have but one measely Rhodophiala seedling in a pot.  I would be happy with any Rhodophiala, let alone with such a beautiful color!  I wonder if mine will ever bloom....

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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