Pedicularis sylvatica

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Boland
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Pedicularis sylvatica

Another species only known in North America within Newfoundland. It is not native here (unlike Bartsia which is) but naturalized in a few places. Again it is hemiparasitic so may be challenging to grow. Also seems to like wetter soils. The purple foliage is great even without the blooms.

Lori S.
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Joined: 2009-10-27

That's a very attractive plant, as are so many Pedicularis.  What an odd thing to be introduced and to become naturalized, though!  So many introduced plant species are here due to agriculture, but it's hard to imagine it would have been the case with this one.  Any speculation, Todd?

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
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Joined: 2011-04-27

Todd - if only these Pedicularis were growable; they really are extraordinarily attractive plants (I expect partly because they aren't growable!). Do you know how long this species has been naturalised in Newfoundland? Cliff made a whole study of these plants on the SRGC IRG - wonderfully photogenic but often very difficult to identify.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

Hoy
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Beautiful picture Todd!

This species, Pedicularis sylvatica sylvatica is very common here. I think it is the same subspecies you have, Todd? The other subspecies, P. s. hibernica also do grow here.They are usually found in very moist Sphagnum moss.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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You can see in the pic that this clump is growing in sphagnum...perhaps we have the hibernica subsp...I had no idea there were different subsp.  I've only seen P. sylvatica in the St. John's area.  A similar larger sopecies is P. palustris, native to the limestone barrens.  Like Bartsia alpina, it is a European species that just makes it to North America in Newfoundland.  P. sylvatica has been here at least 50 years but is very restricted...how it got here is anyone's guess.  Like you say, it is certainly unusual to have a Pedicularis as a weed species....albeit a nice weed!

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
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Todd wrote:

You can see in the pic that this clump is growing in sphagnum...perhaps we have the hibernica subsp...I had no idea there were different subsp.  I've only seen P. sylvatica in the St. John's area.  A similar larger sopecies is P. palustris, native to the limestone barrens.  Like Bartsia alpina, it is a European species that just makes it to North America in Newfoundland.  P. sylvatica has been here at least 50 years but is very restricted...how it got here is anyone's guess.  Like you say, it is certainly unusual to have a Pedicularis as a weed species....albeit a nice weed!

I would like to have it in my garden but have no proper place for it!

According to my flora (the Norwegian "bible" of plants)

You may recognize the name Dagny Tande Lid. She made the drawings of "Rocky Mountains Wild Flowers")

it is the sylvatica subspecies which is found in Newfoundland. P. s. sylvatica has glabrous calyx and peduncle. The other one has curly hair here. On sylvatica the stem is glabrous too or with two rows of hair while hibernica is pubescent.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Thanks for the info Trond!

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

cohan
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Really gorgeous! I'd be happy to try this sp too, and really love some of the small creamy/yellow spp I've seen.. Locally we have lots of P groenlandica which I do love (haven't tried growing it yet, but will), but of course the small ones have a different charm!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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I'll be looking for that one too!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Hoy wrote:

I'll be looking for that one too!

Which one, groenlandica? if so, I could give you seed by the bagful ;)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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cohan wrote:

Hoy wrote:

I'll be looking for that one too!

Which one, groenlandica? if so, I could give you seed by the bagful ;)

What I meant was I can look for seed of palustris. It is also common here.

But I wouldn't say no to some seed of groenlandica. That species doesn't grow here and looks very nice ;D

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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