Hardy Succulents - Aizoaceae

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Great photos guys!I grow a few of these myself!The two smaller ones are D. Basuticum and D. sphalmanthoides. They have never given me any worries and are very reliable.

First three D. sphalmanthoidesSecond three D. Basuticum

From the High Desert Steppe of the Great Basin and the Eastern Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7 http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/ John P Weiser

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Weiser wrote:

Great photos guys!I grow a few of these myself!The two smaller ones are D. Basuticum and D. sphalmanthoides. They have never given me any worries and are very reliable.

I can see that! I have always dreamed of growing a floriferous vygie! Some survive for a couple of years but they never bloom like that!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

HoyI loose them too but I usually have two or three growing in differant locations and one will always survive. Delosperma cooperi seeds around quite vigorously. I find it sprouting in some of the most unlikely and inconvenient places. I'd say right in the center of a patch of Opuntia, armed with two inch, sharp spines a little inconvenient.

Since I mentioned Delosperma cooperi here are a couple of shots.

From the High Desert Steppe of the Great Basin and the Eastern Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7 http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/ John P Weiser

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

John,Here in Minnesota, and I would expect for Trond with his wet winters, Delospermas (and like genera) that can take the cold die easily from winter wet.  I don't expect that is a problem with you.

What is it that makes some die while others of the same species live in your climate?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Yes, Rick is right. It is the wet winters and the sudden change between mild/wet and cold/dry that kills.Maybe that is changing. The weather forecast says cold, dry and sunny weather the next weeks. Very extraordinary, last year we had only two days with freezing temperatures in November. (Cold, that is -4C/25F; and sunny, that is only a few hours sunshine at this time of the year).

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

RickI don't know quite what takes some out. We get most of our moisture in the winter with a lot of freeze thaw cycles(almost every day). Average winter temperatures don't vary a lot how ever our snow cover varies widely from year to year. Last year we had a lot that stayed around for a couple of months. The year before what little we had didn't stay for more a couple of days in a row. The planting medium is the same through out the garden. The exposures to sun and wind are the same. So I have no ready answer. Age of the plants may play into the answer. I have had the older woody/stringy centers of some mats die out but the rooted edges lived on. So if I were to give my best guess I would have to say older plants seem more vulnerable to die off due to moisture around the crown.

By the way, I know how hard it is to keep Delosperma alive in the northern latitudes. I gardened in Bismarck, ND for twenty years before moving to Reno. I do not envy your struggles. I never was able to keep them alive for even one winter. It was very frustrating for about three years then, I decided to just give up and live with the dream of growing them. Little did I know, I would get to fulfill that dream. :) Of course I still can't grow them all.  :(  

From the High Desert Steppe of the Great Basin and the Eastern Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7 http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/ John P Weiser

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Weiser wrote:

Great photos guys!I grow a few of these myself!The two smaller ones are D. Basuticum and D. sphalmanthoides. They have never given me any worries and are very reliable.

First three D. sphalmanthoidesSecond three D. Basuticum

Catching up here, I've been preoccupied.  Oh my, I love these things, John the D. sphalmanthoides is stunning.  Another thing I like about them, they have NO THORNS nor glochids ;D  Well, I sure hope at least a few of these things survive the winter here, and I'm encouraged by the success of a yellow Delosperma in Peter George's garden (in Central, Massachusetts) which is probably D. basuticum.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Mark This is an alpine Delosperma that should work for you (maybe??) Delosperma nubigenum. It has a hard time with my hot, low humidity, summers. It will scorch and look very tattered and abused. I have had them die if they are not given enough water. They always plump back up in the fall when the weather cools down.

From the High Desert Steppe of the Great Basin and the Eastern Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7 http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/ John P Weiser

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I echo John's comments about D. nubigenum.  And for a delosperma, it flowers rather sparsely, or at least I have never gotten it to bloom spectacularly in the 10 years that I have grown it. I still have it, just because I still have it, but I won't cry a tear if it were to disappear in my collection.  You might find this pic of mine interesting in the Wiki image gallery:http://nargs.org/nargswiki/tiki-browse_gallery.php?galleryId=21&offset=20

MUCH better, and equally hardy is D. basuticum.  It grows tighter, is more adaptable to winter moisture, and puts on a great floral show every year.  Prettier flowers, too, in my opinion.

Delosperma basuticum

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

The taxonomy of the hardy yellow-flowered Delosperma is in great disarray...  Here's discussion over at SRGC about the messy state of affairs:http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=3795.60

McDonough wrote:

I'm encouraged by the success of a yellow Delosperma in Peter George's garden (in Central, Massachusetts) which is probably D. basuticum.

Well, Mark, if it's encouraging to know a yellow Delosperma can be hardy in zones 5/6, then you must be over the moon to hear they can be hardy even in zone 3!  ;D ;D This one, whatever it really is, has been hardy here since 2004, and another slightly-different yellow one shows signs of hanging in there too.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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