Allium 2013

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ClifflineGardens
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Joined: 2013-01-14
Allium 2013

I'm trying to propagate what is labeled as Allium farreri (cyathophorum), and was sold to me by PlantWorldSeeds. Attempt is being made in a bottom watered 50/50 coco peat/sand.

The packet stated that no stratification was necessary. Can this be true?

I've got some under cold treatment as well, but if it's unnecessary, that would be useful to know. I've read this is a 'common' garden plant from multiple sources, but I've never seen it that I can recall.

I've grown A. shoenoprasum, cernuum, and canadense. Only cernuum needed strat.

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

Seems that most sites recommend warm/cold/cool, or at least cold stratification for Allium cyathophorum var farreri.

http://www.onrockgarden.com/germination-guide/allium-farreri  4C for 3 weeks then move to 20C for germination

http://tomclothier.hort.net/page02.html recommends Sow at 18-22ºC (64-71ºF) for 2-4 wks, move to -4 to +4ºC (24-39ºF) for 4-6 wks, move to 5-12ºC (41-53ºF) for germination, KLAS says the same thing.

Hope this is helpful.... Good luck with your seed, the packets I bought from Plant World all proved viable.

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

GreenRoofer wrote:

I'm trying to propagate what is labeled as Allium farreri (cyathophorum), and was sold to me by PlantWorldSeeds. Attempt is being made in a bottom watered 50/50 coco peat/sand.

The packet stated that no stratification was necessary. Can this be true?

In my experience, some Allium species will germinate under a variety of temperatures (another words, not temperature specific, stratification not necessary), and germination is in response to moisture levels.  Can even sow species like Allium flavum midsummer, flats outdoors (but not in full blast of summer sun where they will dry out quickly), but kept moist, they will germinate in about 2 weeks.  After a soaking rain, go check seed flats, should be good germination.

I haven't sown seed of A. cyathophorum var. farreri in some years now, but will do some experiments this year to validate my memory on this.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Barstow
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

stephenb wrote:

Allium formosum, a new species...

http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112814645/kyrgyz-onion-species-dis...

Thanks for posting this Stephen, always interesting to learn of newly described species. The link you give shows a photo of Allium spathulatum, also a new species, to which newly described A. formosum is closely related.  For those who may not have noticed, there's a small link at the bottom of the article that goes to a full description of Allium formosum with comparitive drawing diagnostics between A. spathulatum and A. formosum. I plan on contacting Dr. Reinhard Fritsch to see if he has available some good photos of both species.  Here's a link to the article:
http://www.pensoft.net/journals/phytokeys/article/4130/allium-formosum-s...

While looking at new species and googling, I found another new one, "Allium aladaghense (Amaryllidaceae, Allieae), a new species of section Asteroprason from northeast of Iran" published in Phytotaxa, Volume (56), No (1), Year (2012-6) , Pages (28-34).  Can't get the whole article free, but here's a PDF preview, and a photo link:

Allium aladaghense, article (translated to English, poor translation):
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fa&u=http://vazeh.com/k-4509942-Allium%2520aladaghense&prev=/search%3Fq%3DAllium%2Baladaghense%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26biw%3D1350%26bih%3D538&sa=X&ei=N1RcUYi3EojB0QGCsoCoDg&ved=0CGIQ7gEwBw
Image:
http://cdn.yjc.ir/files/fa/news/1391/3/22/42595_132.jpg
PDF preview:
http://profdoc.um.ac.ir/pubs_files/p11028231.pdf

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Janis Ruksans has a new web site, just gleaned this fact from the SRGC.  Take a look at the Allium offerings, it makes me weep, I'd need to mortgage my house to afford all of the beauties I want. Oh, to be so afflicted with plant lust :rolleyes:. Recognized leading expert on Allium, Dr. Reinhard Fritsch, visited Janis (last year I believe) and helped establish correct IDs on many of these rare offerings. I'm also surprised by just how many Western American species he is growing and offering; I have always found most of them very slow and difficult growers.
http://rarebulbs.lv/index.php/en/catalogue

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

McDonough wrote:

Janis Ruksans has a new web site, just gleaned this fact from the SRGC.  Take a look at the Allium offerings, it makes me weep, I'd need to mortgage my house to afford all of the beauties I want. http://rarebulbs.lv/index.php/en/catalogue

Mark,
at least you can buy directly from him!
We have to get someone with an import permit and a quarantine house to import for us and that's not easy! :(
At least we can look at the pics! ;D
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

two colour forms of Allium akaka I collected in Turkey and an unnamed species for Mark to work on.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Sorry about the delay Tony, been ignoring the forum, busy at work, then also busy in the garden.

Your Allium akaka forms are wonderful, the first portrait is perfection, the drying leaf tips rolling back like an Ionic column:
http://www.njcu.edu/programs/jchistory/Images/B_Images/Barrow_Mansion/Io...

I saw the suggestion on SRGC that the Allium sp. from Turkey might be "karputense", should be spelled Allium kharputense; it comes close to matching appearance, then another possibility comes to mind; Allium colchicifolium.

Being a bit more systematic about it, I used the Tubives resource again (Flora of Turkey) at:
http://turkherb.ibu.edu.tr/index.php

Then searched on the Kahramanmaraş province, it gives the following list of Allium native to that province, notice that neither kharputense nor colchicifolium are found in that province.

  Allium callidictyon
Allium tchihatschewii
Allium sivasicum
Allium paniculatum ssp. paniculatum
Allium pallens ssp. pallens
Allium glumaceum
Allium tauricola
Allium brevicaule
Allium macrochaetum ssp. macrochaetum
Allium scorodoprasum ssp. rotundum
Allium calyptratum
Allium vineale
Allium affine
Allium cardiostemon
Allium orientale
Allium asclepiadeum

Of that list, the only two possibilities are A. orientale and asclepiadeum.  I think it comes closest to A. orientale, widespread in Turkey. The Taxonomic Allium Reference Collection at Gatersleben has three collections from Antalya Turkey, with white flowers, that look similar to your plant both for foliage and flowers.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Mark

thanks for that reply and I think you may be right in A. orientale. I have to say it has not flourished and my recollection in the wild is of a much better more robust plant. It was in a very wet field which wolud be baked hard in summer and I do not have such conditions.

I love the A akaka which I collected myself in Eastern Turkey. In the wild the ones I saw were totally sessile and yet I have seen a picture in the wild looking just like mine. it must vary again with the conditions.

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Spent all day yesterday walking woodlands, with a very good friend. Found plenty of native orchids and other superb woodlanders such as Paris quadrifolia, Lathraea squamaria and numerous others. For overall  :o  :o this area of Allium ursinum took some beating though.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

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