Inside-out-flower: Vancouveria - my American dream!

28 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Terrific photos, Mark.  I always find it hard to photograph such airy, insubstantial things as the flower stalks on Vancouveria, Thalictrum, etc. but you have aced it.
V. chrysantha is especially intriguing with its golden flowers.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

Terrific photos, Mark.  I always find it hard to photograph such airy, insubstantial things as the flower stalks on Vancouveria, Thalictrum, etc. but you have aced it.
V. chrysantha is especially intriguing with its golden flowers.

Thanks Lori, I had 1001 other photos where the flowers were out of focus ;D  My daughter and I share an entry level ($99) Nikon Coolpix camera, with a number of known shortcomings or limitations, but I've learned a number of tricks to compensate.  You're right, one of the hardest things to capture are skinny airy plants, but I get lots of practice with slender Alliums. :D

The camera is also terrible with light color flowers (white and light yellow especially). One of the advantages of being unemployed, is that I can reshoot my pics over and over again at various times during the day, to find the most optimal lighting conditions.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Excellent pics, Mark! It is not only difficult to picture such airy stalks but with white flowers too! My old camera didn't focus on white flowers at all. Fortunately it broke so I had to buy me a new one for Yule present ;D
By the way, anybody having a piece of rhizome of V chrysantha for trade (when it thaws)?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

And there was one of those really great looking leaf forms of Jeffersonia diphylla you have, too, Mark.

Are you saying that you crossed Vancouveria and Epimedium and may have gotten viable seed?
That would be awesome!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Interesting leaf form on the Jeffersonia, Mark.

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Are you saying that you crossed Vancouveria and Epimedium and may have gotten viable seed?
That would be awesome!

Well, I gave it a try, attempting to cross it with Epimedium membranaceum and E. elongatum.  We shall see in a couple years whether anything was successful.  My attempts were not highly controlled, so while seed was set, who knows whether there was any selfing or other pollen contamination.; the potential offspring shall be judge.  Darrell Probst thinks that such crosses may be possible.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

RickR wrote:

Are you saying that you crossed Vancouveria and Epimedium and may have gotten viable seed?
That would be awesome!

Well, I gave it a try, attempting to cross it with Epimedium membranaceum and E. elongatum.  We shall see in a couple years whether anything was successful.  My attempts were not highly controlled, so while seed was set, who knows whether there was any selfing or other pollen contamination.; the potential offspring shall be judge.  Darrell Probst thinks that such crosses may be possible.

I'm curious to see what a cross like that might give, hope to see that in a couple of years.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Jeddeloh
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-02

I have Vancouveria chrysantha, one clone, and while it's set seed none of it's germinated.  So maybe you do need two clones.  Has anyone queried Darrell Probst on this?  Anyone with a chrysantha want to swap plants so we each have two clones?  I can't remember the time of year to divide vancouverias/epimediums but I seem to recall their is a specific time of year that's most successful.

Jan in Portland, Oregon where they're forecasting 20F in a couple of days.  Nothing like a round of "stuff the greenhouse" to get the blood moving.

Jan Jeddeloh, Portland, Oregon, USA, Zone 8.  Rainy winters (40 inches or 1 meter) and pleasant dry summers which don't start until July most years!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Jan wrote:

I have Vancouveria chrysantha, one clone, and while it's set seed none of it's germinated.  So maybe you do need two clones.  Has anyone queried Darrell Probst on this?  Anyone with a chrysantha want to swap plants so we each have two clones?  I can't remember the time of year to divide vancouverias/epimediums but I seem to recall their is a specific time of year that's most successful.

Jan in Portland, Oregon where they're forecasting 20F in a couple of days.  Nothing like a round of "stuff the greenhouse" to get the blood moving.

Jan, would you have a photo to post of your Vancouveria chrysantha?  How does it grow for you?  I hear that it is not as aggressive as V. hexandra.  Did you collect and sow the seed when first shed, if Vancouveria is anything like Epimedium, the seed is ephemeral and should not be totally dried before sowing; it should be sown soon after harvest in spring/early summer and the pots not allowed to totally dry out, the seed should germinate the following spring.  However, I have no personal experience sowing seed on Vancouveria.

Whether two clones on a single Vancouveria species are needed for seed set, again I don't know, but such claims are made for Epimedium.  I haven't asked Darrell about that two-clones requirement for Vancouveria seed set, although he does consider the possibility of crosses being made between Vancouveria  and Epimedium.

Dividing Epimediums is best in spring when they are in active fresh growth; either very early at pre-emergence, or after flowering.  I also divide them successfully in autumn once cool weather arrives, yet with enough fall weather left to keep the roots growing to get them somewhat established.  Plants divided in mid-summer during hot weather tend to just sit there and show the most amount of shock.  Keeping them well watered after division is important to success.

All three species of Vancouveria are available commercially, a Google search should yield some nursery sources.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Jeddeloh
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-02

Well, I thought I had a photo of chrysantha, in fact I know I took one a couple of years ago but I sure can't find it.  I'll try to get one when it blooms this spring. 

It's very happy where I have it in well drained soil getting a steady diet of Douglas Fir needles.  I still don't think it's as agressive as hexandra which is native to my property. I had a devil of a time getting rid of it in an area where it wasn't wanted.

Yes, I've tried sowing the seed when it was fresh off the plant.  Still didn't germinate but then I didn't get a lot of seed to work with.

It's not really up yet-just thinking about it.  Do you think now would be a good time to send some rhizomes over seas (the recipient knows who he is)?  I have an email out to Diana Reeck of Collector's Nursery about the best time to do this but I haven't heard back from her.  She grows a lot of epimediums.

Jan

Jan Jeddeloh, Portland, Oregon, USA, Zone 8.  Rainy winters (40 inches or 1 meter) and pleasant dry summers which don't start until July most years!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments