Inside-out-flower: Vancouveria - my American dream!

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
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Joined: 2009-12-15
Inside-out-flower: Vancouveria - my American dream!

I have grown Vancouveria hexandra for several years and the colony expands in my small wood (consisting of one giant sequoia, one tulip tree, one arborvitae and some shrubs) in front of my house. I have been looking for the other Vancouveria species but not succeeded yet.

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Looks great!  I've never tried this genus....I heard they are not that hardy so I have been reticent to try it.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I grow Vancouveria hexandra here, Todd, and have over many years, so it's hardier than one may assume from its natural range!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Vancouveria hexandra is rock-solid hardy here too, although comes with the warning that it is too aggressive a spreader.  Knowing this, I planted my plants down in my dry woods under moisture-wicking Sugar Maple trees, farther down in my property than any water hoses reach. And in 20 years the V. hexandra patch is about 9-10' (3+ meters) across in all those years, actually fairly moderate spreading compared to many much more vigorous spreaders.  I documented this on the Scottish Rock Garden Club, so rather than repeat it here, I'll post the links.

Trond, there are only 3 species of Vancouveria, all three are available in the USA (but only in a couple specialty nurseries), although I only discovered this fact recently.  I would love to have the yellow C. chrysantha. I'm working on getting seed of both V. chrysantha and V. planipetalum, and if I do and I'm able to raise fertile plants, I can share seeds.  The part I worry about, it might be that two different clones are needed for seed production... out of hundreds upon hundreds of multi-flowered inflorescences on V. hexandra, not 1 seed was set!

Vancouveria chrysantha
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=4769.msg156964#msg156964

Vancouveria hexandra and V. planipetalum
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?topic=4769.msg154427#msg154427

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Vancouveria hexandra grows here also.  For some here it is a thug, but for most it is fairly benign.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Vancouveria hexandra grows here also.  For some here it is a thug, but for most it is fairly benign.

I wonder if it is moisture level that brings out the thuggishness?  So, just for laughs, I tried some hybridization of Vancouveria hexandra pollen on some epimediums, we'll see in 2-3 years whether anything worked.  I know this is something that Darrell Probst has considered as well.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Vancouveria hexandra grows here also.  For some here it is a thug, but for most it is fairly benign.

No thug at all even if it spreads. But it is confined here between roads and walkways. In the spring the huge Anemone 'Robinsoniana' cover all with their bloom and a few other plants put their heads through the groundcover of ivy.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

McDonough wrote:

I wonder if it is moisture level that brings out the thuggishness? 

Maybe so.  It's rather slowly-spreading in my yard, where it also competes for moisture with trees.  (It may also be at or near its hardiness limit here, I suppose.)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

I've grown it in 2 different gardens...first in zone 5 Massachusetts in a good loamy soil and it was quite rapidly spreading through the garden competing with Primula & other woodlanders. But here in Vermont zone 4 it's more well behaved. I planted it along a stream with Phlox stolonifera, Primula japonica and some Iris sibirica and it seems to be staying within it's allotted space. But time will tell.

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Amy, It shall be interesting to see how the Vancouveria does growing streamside in conditions where Primula japonica would grow, most likely with much more moisture situation, compared to my dry dry dry woodland under the water-shedding umbrella of mature Sugar Maples with their thirsty roots.  However, I like the fact the Vancouveria can survive and look relatively lush in such a dry woodland situation.  Jeffersonia diphylla and Pulmonaria rubra also naturalize my dry woodland, although the Pulmonaria foliage flags terribly with the dryness but persists regardless.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Some more Vancouveria links, and some photos from spring 2010 that I haven't shown here yet.

Vancouveria hexandra - white insideout flower
http://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch?mode=symbol&keywordquery=VAHE
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0210+0547

Vancouveria chrysantha - Siskiyou insideout flower
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0106+1163
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0605+1171
...foliage and pods
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=1351+3163+4290+0084

Vancouveria planipetala
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=photos_index&where...
(A couple images in the gallery might represent V. hexandra and not planipetala).

photo of V. planipetala by John Weagle of Nova Scotia:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4769.0;attach...

A few views of my wide carpet of V. hexandra, Jeffersonia diphylla leaves visible in the first photo:

Up close, the little parachute shaped flowers of Vancouveria are cute.  I wonder, if Vancouveria and Epimedium could be crossed, what the flower shape would be like?  I goofed around and tried making some crosses, we'll see what happened.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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