Jeffersonia

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I can recommend the nursery Yusawa-engei. I have ordered both plants and seeds from them. The plants travel all the way from Japan to Norway in very good condition!

Although the flowers of Jeffersonia are ephemeral they (both species) are indeed worth a place in a garden! The leaves are decorative too.
I have a small batch of seedlings now waiting for planting out later ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Those developing seed pods bring a whole new personality to the plant! Very nice pictures on the Wiki - I'm not so sure about the 'variegated' plant, but interesting that this is transmitted via the seed. It be good to try and multiply Rick's plant because if it is completely sterile I imagine the flowers last much longer than normal Jeffersonia; normally they are so beautiful, but so fleeting.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

The long cold spring, and sudden change to warmer weather, has brought out plants all over the garden, and this white Jeffersonia is definitely one of the loveliest...

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Thanks for the update Rick- I've posted a link to here from your
thread on the SRGC Forum from last year.  :)

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tim, I'm envious of your beautiful white Jeffersonia dubia.  Seeing this I ran outside to check the spot where I planted the single seedling last summer, nothing showing yet.  Not sure if I kept it moist enough after planting it out under the canopy of hemlock trees, the hemlocks tend to block rain from reaching the ground.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

All the colours are great :)
Interesting nursery too! Wondering about timing- Jeffersonia and Dicentra are warm/cold/warm germination, right? So the time to buy/sow would summer?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

cohan wrote:

All the colours are great :)
Interesting nursery too! Wondering about timing- Jeffersonia and Dicentra are warm/cold/warm germination, right? So the time to buy/sow would summer?

I find jeffersonia seeds are very short lived and always sow straight from the pod the day it ripens. It then germinates the next spring.

As to dividing plants the only one I tried by cutting in two died at once,on the other hand I have a plant of the white form which was propagated by division for me, so it could just be my lack of skill.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tony wrote:

I find jeffersonia seeds are very short lived and always sow straight from the pod the day it ripens. It then germinates the next spring.

When I collect seed of Jeffersonia, Epimedium, and woodland Iris species, I collect directly into plastic baggies.  They can stay in the seed for up to 2-3 weeks without problem, and then sown, to germinate next spring; just gives a bit of leeway as to when the seed is sown.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Over the years people have toyed with the idea of a short viability seed exchange because there are so many woodland plants in particular like this: seed could be kept in slightly damp vermiculite for a long time if necessary. A few growers do supply seed like this in the UK, and occasionally Society seed exchanges institute the idea, but there are probably not enough knowledgeable gardeners to really make it viable (excuse the pun). Similar, but different, is supplying seed that has been pretreated (eg: by cold stratification) to improve germination, and the German seedsmen Jelitto must be pre-eminent in this. Years ago I remember getting some rosulate viola seed that had been stored moist in the cold and it gave very good germination - growing them on was another problem!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

If I read correctly, the Japanese nursery noted above is selling seed of this sort moist packed, as Kristl does, which seems to preserve them for some time- until sown if the same season, or if it's a bit later, the moist packing seems to take the place of the  warm period in warm/cold/warm, so they can go straight to cold.
Just curious about how well these (and Dicentras I was especially looking at on that list  ;D ) respond to moist packing..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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