Jeffersonia

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Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Seedlings of J. diphylla are growing lustily, now I'm worried about being able to make a new woodland bed large enough to hold them all, the start of my "Jeffersonian woodland lawn".  In the overhead view (photo 1), you can see equally full flats of J. dubia in the back (center and to the left).

Like Rick, I wouldn't worry much! BTW, are the seedlings easy to plant out or do they sulk afterwards?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Like Rick, I wouldn't worry much! BTW, are the seedlings easy to plant out or do they sulk afterwards?

They're easy as dirt ;D  All kidding aside, they seem indifferent to being handled and transplanted. 

By the way, an interesting thing about both Jeffersonia and Epimedium seed, I kept some flats where I received no germination, and in the 2nd year, a few additional seedlings showed up.  I was most disappointed last year when seed of white Jeffersonia dubia (kindly sent to me by a SRGC correspondant) showed zero germination.  I held on to the flat, and this year, a single seedling appeared!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Those flats of Jeffersonia seedlings are pretty exciting to a nurseryman's eyes! Jeffersonia dubia was one of the first plants that hooked me on 'alpines' (from a picture in a book by Anna Griffiths), but we have never managed to grow it well - too dry I suppose. Those full flowered forms of Rick's and on the SRGC Forum are even more delectable, and also the striking variety Mark showed from Korea. There must be somewhere in the garden we could do better with them!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Seedlings of J. diphylla are growing lustily, now I'm worried about being able to make a new woodland bed large enough to hold them all, the start of my "Jeffersonian woodland lawn".  In the overhead view (photo 1), you can see equally full flats of J. dubia in the back (center and to the left).

I can really see how that would be a problem, Mark.  :P If I didn't live on the other side of the ocean....I would have gladly helped you...A flat more or less for my garden wouldn't be a problem, still have a lot of lawn to convert to woodland beds  ;D ;D :P

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Propagation non-results:

You may remember that I wanted to divide a particularly wonderful J. dubia specimen.  Being apparently sterile, it's stems multiply vigorously, so I can easily afford loosing some.

   

When the leaves matured, I tried to cut six growing points off the side while leaving the plant undisturbed in the ground.  I cut vertically into the soil hoping I would get some roots along with the stems.  No dice.  This outer group of stems seemed to curl in, just under the soil surface, toward the center of the plant.  I think if I were to dig the the whole plant in the early spring (no, not going to do that!), the shape of the top of the plant would look like a mushroom, with a constriction below the crown, but "exploding" at the top with a multitude of pips.  This is unlike the growth of a regular J. dubia nearby.

So I had four usable short stems,  and stripped all but two leaves per stem.  Then "planted" them in a vermiculite/peat mix, and enclosed them in a clear plastic bag in Nearing frame conditions.  The extra leaves were so stiff and non-wilting, that just for kicks, I tried to see if they might root. I treated them as one might when rooting a tropical begonia leaf, with perhaps a centimeter stem,  and the leaf laid flat on the vermiculite/peat surface, with the main veins cut with a razor blade.  All other rooting parameters were the same.

   

Neither method was successful.  But what was interesting to note was that the individual severed leaves actually lasted longer before withering than the stems!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A pity it didn't work! Did you try rooting hormone?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

No I didn't, Trond.  That is yet another avenue to explore.  That and different times of the season.

Any thoughts on timing from anyone out there?

I forgot to mention on the pic of the cuttings you can see the withered flower stems if you you magnify the image.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

When I first got the white form of Jeffersonia dubia and it had bulked up quite well, I tried dividing it. It was a great mistake; the divisions sat still for ever. Perhaps I should have caught it just at the point the plant was beginning to grow. It sounds to me like a ripe plant for tissue culture if hormonal treatment is likely to stimulate proliferation of callus-like growth that can then be stimulated to produce shoots. It does sound as though it might be triploid. Maybe if it keeps growing strongly it would eventually be possible to get large divisions that are not checked too much, to allow a bit more experimentation.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, maybe best not to tempt fate, and leave your glorious plant alone and just enjoy it, and take lots of pictures for all to enjoy. I'm getting superstitious with some plants, worried that attempts to propagate will kill them.

I took a photo of the Korean Form today, to show a couple blooms that had dropped their petals and red pods are developing. I later noticed the pod and remnant stamens and anthers form an amusing face.  Took another close-up shot, they look like little gesturing Jeffersonia monkeys  ;)

Going back to yesterday's late afternoon photo, I didn't notice the "little guys", but they can be seen here too.  I thought the lighting dramatic, showing up the Pulmonaria and red Corydalis solida in the background.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I just came across this, a Japanese nursery selling seed of a variegated leaf Jeffersonia dubia, photo is very small (scroll down), but it looks quite remarkable.
http://www.yuzawa-engei.net/08English/02SeedsCategories/02Seeds.html

Sometimes I should look closer to home, here's a photo of Jeffersonia dubia color forms right here on NARGS wiki, in the garden of nearby Jan Sacks and Marty Schaefer:
http://nargs.org/nargswiki/tiki-browse_image.php?&imageId=4248

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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