Epimedium 2013

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Longma wrote:

The closest nursery to us has these for sale - Epimedium 'Black Sea' , Epimedium perralderianum and Epimedium x youngianum 'Shikinomai' .

We're thinking we should get one of each. Any comments on these three please?

Black Sea is a good one, a slow spreader, with leaves that turn a ruddy near glossy black color in late autumn (it's evergreen).  It has tallish sprays of light yellow-orange flowers, I posted a photo earlier:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=1254.msg23277#msg23277

E. perralderianum I've never seen (rare in the US) but is very close to pinnatum ssp. colchicum and the hybrids between both species known as x perralchicum are what most people grow, such as the familiar one names 'Wisley' and 'Frohnleiten', with yellow verbascum-like flowers, handsome evergreen leaves nicely veining, and once again, a slow to moderate spreading habit (not a clumper). Wim Boens was just mentioning E. x youngianum 'Shikinomai', another I'm not familiar with, although it has white flowers, images do come up with Google.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Boy what a treat these postings have been ...I have small number of different unnamed plants ,( divisions from friends) ,however i feel another obsession coming on ..... ;D

I wonder Mark or Gerrit if you like to comment on the viability of seed as I've never managed to successfully raise seed from any of the overseas exchanges.Thanks.

Cheers Dave. 

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Picked up four plants today.

Anyone have any comments about the accuracy / suitability of the book -  'Epimedium - The Genus by William T Stearn'. ?

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Ron, "The Genus Epimedium" by Stearn is top notch, an essential "bible" on the genus, and other herbaceous Berberidaceae such as Podophyllum, Leontice, Diphylleia, Jeffersonia, Vancouveria, and a couple others. Published in 2002, a year after Stearn's death, it was up to date taxonomically on Epimedium at the time, although new species have been published since then.  I bought mine used but in great shape from Amazon.com at $50 (which is the original selling price), many other copies went as high as $200 for a copy, I was lucky to find the one that I did.

Dave, Epimedium seed can't be had successfully from seed exchanges, because the dry seed will be dead.  The seed must be sown fresh soon after collecting it in late spring (to early summer, depending on the species).  I sow mine immediately after the pods are ripe and starting to spill seed, the seed itself looks like little green lima beans with attached fleshy elaiosomes.  I collect seed in plastic sandwich bags, then sow within a week or two, using good compost in peat flats, cover the seed lightly, then top dress with decomposed pine back mulch, cover the flats with wire (prevent squirrels and chipmunks from digging/eating the seed), flats are kept in a shady spot all summer, and sprinkle with water every now and then to prevent dessication, they sit there exposed to weather all winter, then germinate like little beans in spring.  Jeffersonia is exactly the same.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Thanks a lot for the seed viabilty comments Mark --I had read on the internet that seed needed to be fresh however i thought I'd double check and get your or Gerrit's observations.

As an aside here's a shot i took today of a very small 8 cm rhizome of E.versicolor i took off a small plant last month .........I wasn't too sure whether my timing was a bit late however it seems to have settled and new growth is evident.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

There is some great information on epis which I've missed while being at the Czech Alpine Conference. We had a much wetter summer last year than normal and I think this has helped a lot with the later flowering woodlanders, and many of the epimediums are looking better than they ever have. I've never tried using such small rhizomes as Dave shows, and generally with dividing epimediums I have found them slow to grow away if they are split up too much. I would like to try many more of these under our apple trees and it is very valuable to hear the experiences of Mark and Gerrit in particular. Will certainly look out for 'Pink Champagne'!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

gerrit wrote:

After having seen E. campanulatum and E. x ecalcaratum '...' with very special inflorescence, I show my Epimedium davidii with irregular formed petals. Each flower is different. And I'm fond of it.

Gerrit, that's a very fine looking Epi, and amusing too with the indefinitely shaped spurs.  And so floriferous!  What is your source for that plant?  I'm wondering if it might be a hybrid with ecalcaratum, because that feature, of variable vestigial to partly developed spurs, is a strong and unique characteristic of ecalcaratum.  It's hybrids, such as 'Lemon Zest' that I showed earlier, and 'Buttered Popcorn', another Darrell Probst hybrid just coming into bloom now, both show that same characteristic. 

I have some flowering-size seed-grown plants from 'Lemon Zest', and one in particular has flowers that look just like regular davidii, perhaps revealing parentage in 'Lemon Zest'.  I also have some hybrids (2nd generation) from E. stellulatum x membranaceum, and these second generation seedlings are showing forms similar to membranaceum, others following the stellulatum look; interesting to see the genetic tendencies and results in further generations.  I will post some photos later.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

Gerrit, that's a very fine looking Epi, and amusing too with the indefinitely shaped spurs.  And so floriferous!  What is your source for that plant?  I'm wondering if it might be a hybrid with ecalcaratum, because that feature, of variable vestigial to partly developed spurs, is a strong and unique characteristic of ecalcaratum.  It's hybrids, such as 'Lemon Zest' that I showed earlier, and 'Buttered Popcorn', another Darrell Probst hybrid just coming into bloom now, both show that same characteristic. 

You are definitely right, determining it as a hybrid between E. davidii and E. ecalcaratum. Certainly after seeing E. 'Lemon Zest'.
KVP selled it as a davidii. I asked him about this aberration (defect) but he was not so amused. It could happen was his reply. But I was happy enough. A normal davidii is a common plant. This one is so cute.
Each individual flower is different. Sometimes 4 petals but also 3, 2 or one. Or none with only a sort of shoulder where the spur should be. It's curious and funny.

In attachment, Epimedium 'Egret'. From a Belgian source. And new to me. lovely enough.

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Toole wrote:

Thanks a lot for the seed viabilty comments Mark --I had read on the internet that seed needed to be fresh however i thought I'd double check and get your or Gerrit's observations.

Hi Dave.

Am I right, when I say it is difficult to get Epimediums in New Zealand? Due to several restrictions?
In that case, requests fot fresh seeds is the only option.

Gerrit

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Well, it isn't easy to get Epimediums here either. And it is not about restrictions but knowledge and demand.
So if anybody has some fresh seeds to spare  . . . . .

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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