Epimedium 2013

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gerrit
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Joined: 2011-04-03

Well Trond, I like to collect seeds and send it to you. But you know, no guarantee they will be true to the kind.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Gerrit, I regret that 'Egret' seems unavailable here in the US (if anyone knows otherwise, please let me know), it's another beauty, love the complimentary color of flowers with striking new foliage.

Dave, I wish you success on that E. x versicolor rhizome piece, I've not had good luck with small divisions of Epimedium, have only had good luck with divisions with enough root mass to support them; maybe we get too dry and hot here in the dog days of summer to keep such tiny pieces alive.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

This will be an all-yellow 10-photo post.  When watching plants carefully, and observing hybrid offspring, it's rewarding to pay attention.  Working with some of the yellow species, the results have been fun, but I compare them to baby steps; small differences that can be built upon in further hybridization.

For basis, on the left is E. membranaceum.  It has very large yellow spider blooms, just starting into bloom recently (late by Epimedium standards). It is a perpetual bloomer, which can continue until frost, if weather conditions are fair (enough moisture, no drought). The flowers characteristic to note, is very long yellow petals (spurs, almost no "cup") and small whitish sepals.  On the right is a plant grown from seed of E. davidii "Wolong Select", this particular plant closely resembling the parent.  The characteristics to note; down-curved spurs, boxy cup, and red sepals (the sepals not very visible in this photo).

Two view of plants grown from seed collected on E. davidii "Wolong Select", pollinated with various Epis, including larger flowered types such as membranaceum.  Both photos show flowers from two hyrbids, the two flowers on the left look very much like E. davidii, except instead of small solid red sepals, here the sepals are larger and with yellow base color, spotted with red.  The flower on the right is another hybrid that looks like a miniature E. membranaceum, with whitish to transparent sepals, and almost no central cups.

Two more "overall" views of the same two E. davidii "Wolong Select" hybrids, the first one on the left shows the mini-membranaceum-like plant showing some mottled fresh flush of foliage, and on the right, an earlier view showing the nice basal foliage clumps of both, which look similar.

The next two show a hybrid flowering for the first time; (E. [stellulatum x membranaceum] x various selected), most of these end up looking like stellulatum with clouds of small flowers with broad white sepals and undersized yellow spurs and cup shorter than the sepals. This one surprised me by growing 18" tall with slender stems, and large yellow spider blooms like membranaceum, but with red sepals like davidii instead of white one.

On the left is my ever-blooming Spring-to-October (or November) Epimedium rhizomatosum x membranaceum hybrid, just starting to flower and showing lots of new colorful mottled foliage.  On the right is a poor photo of E. flavum, taken in the rain.  The flowers were fleeting, so didn't get a better photo. This one seems slow growing, a small plant that did nothing in two years years, this year flowering and showing its distinctive blooms, rather thin-textured but lovely open-cupped blooms of light yellow, no other yellow-flowered species looks quite like it.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Like Mark, I find that much larger divisions of epimediums are needed to do well.

   Even with such a vigorous one as Orangekönigin, a single or double crown with roots just seems to sit and sulk.

At least in your pic, Mark, E. flavum looks exceptionally nice.

   Seems like a lot of hybridizing dreams could be born with that one!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

gerrit wrote:

Well Trond, I like to collect seeds and send it to you. But you know, no guarantee they will be true to the kind.

Thanks Gerrit! It's fine with me - I'm not good at remembering names anyway!

This (a very common one I suppose) is the only one flowering here now! And I have forgotten the name :-\
But Mark's yellows looksmuch better!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

I'm another who has trouble remembering Epi names  :-[  .....but that does not prevent my appreciation of these interesting plants.
Here in North East Scotland I think they prefer to be more in the open - we do not get high enough temperatures to bother them and they do best in brighter positions.

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Trond, your plant is E. x versicolor 'Sulphureum', an old standby that has proven its garden value for a nearly a century.  I have this in a couple places, but my biggest patch is down at the lower wooded edge of my property, far out of reach of a hose, growing under dry dry dry Sugar Maples, and after 25 years neglected there, they still persist and grow and flower well.

Maggi, it's an important point you make. Many people here are sold on the idea these are "shade plants" for woodland gardens, when in fact, they revel in bright open light, a half day of sun is best for most compact and vigorous growth, best flowering potential, and more intense leaf coloring.  They can be grown in full sun too, as long as they don't get totally parched.

I should show photos side-by-side of Epimedium "Mark's Star" (thanks for the name Wim :D ), where I grew several plants that got 1/2 day sun, and my original plants growing about 40' away in the north-facing constant shade of my house. The plants in shade all day, flowered 3 weeks later than those getting sun, those in sun were compact and amazingly floriferous, whereas those in full shadow grew more open and flowered well enough but modestly by comparison, a real eye-opener.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Sometimes one will see an aberrant 5-part Epimedium flower.  This year, I have noticed many species and cultivars (dozens) with one or more 5-part flowers, I only caught photos on two of them.

E. rhizomatosum is just coming into flower, one of the creeping species, and a long-season bloomer/repeat bloomer.  Here's a single anomalous 5-part flower.

Earlier, the giant Epimedium grandiflorum 'Red Queen' had several 5-part flowers, here's one such inflorescence, a single 5-part flower then the rest are normal 4-part flowers.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

McDonough wrote:

Maggi, it's an important point you make. Many people here are sold on the idea these are "shade plants" for woodland gardens, when in fact, they revel in bright open light, a half day of sun is best for most compact and vigorous growth, best flowering potential, and more intense leaf coloring.  They can be grown in full sun too, as long as they don't get totally parched.

Mark, I think you underrate the influence of the sun. You are too much focused on your own situation in New England. And Maggi, sorry, but the Scotch are not familiar with the product 'sun'.
Let me explain a common situation in Western Europe, Holland, Belgium, Germany, Northern France, zone 7b, maritime climate. We are in the middle of June. After a Long period of cool weather, the wind is in from Africa, last night I couldn't sleep, Joni Mitchell sings. Temperatures raise suddenly to 30-33 degrees C. The sun shines from 4 am until 10 pm. The inclination is almost vertical. The purple coloured Acer palmatum dissectum burns within a few hours. The other herbaceous plants bow their heads, but will survive. Not the Epimediums. So a spot in the shade is an obligation.

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Today a duet. Two Epimediums are intertwined in a ballet of elfs.

Epimedium acuminatum the purple one and
Epimedium ilicifolium. the yellow.

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