Fritillaria 2012

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Those are some big anthers on F. affinis

Did everyone notice the rippling of the petal edges on that one?
Way cool, Dave!  8)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Those are some big anthers on F. affinis

Did everyone notice the rippling of the petal edges on that one?
Way cool, Dave!  8)

I have to agree Rick, the F. affinis Dave shows us is superb, such a distinctive species in its own right, but this form is really fine and so well grown, I'm jealous!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Michael wrote:

Nice Frits Dave.

Thanks Michael.

RickR wrote:

Those are some big anthers on F. affinis

Did everyone notice the rippling of the petal edges on that one?
Way cool, Dave!  8)

Gee Rick -- you are so observant  :) This was it's first flowering from seed ---in view of your comments i went and viewed my pics of the other F.affinis that flower later on here --none of those show rippling of the petal edge ......

McDonough wrote:

I have to agree Rick, the F. affinis Dave shows us is superb, such a distinctive species in its own right, but this form is really fine and so well grown, I'm jealous!

Thanks Mark --hopefully it will set seed so i can pass it around.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Most  Frit. affinis of the type shown by Dave Toole  - which used to be known as F. lanceolata  and F.  lanceolata tristulis-  usually have those marvelous reptilian ripples on the petal edges. It really highlights the waxy, sturdy nature of the blooms. 

Maggi

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

IMYoung wrote:

Most  Frit. affinis of the type shown by Dave Toole  - which used to be known as F. lanceolata  and F.  lanceolata tristulis-  usually have those marvelous reptilian ripples on the petal edges. It really highlights the waxy, sturdy nature of the blooms. 

Maggi

Thanks Maggi --I'm still learning --in fact i think I'll always be 'an apprentice of many and a master of none'  :'( as my horticultural interests are so wide .

Now if it was NZ natives alpines we were talking about .............................................................. I'd probably still need help ! ;D  ;)

Kind regards to 'Scottie'.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

IMYoung wrote:

Most  Frit. affinis of the type shown by Dave Toole  - which used to be known as F. lanceolata  and F.  lanceolata tristulis-  usually have those marvelous reptilian ripples on the petal edges. It really highlights the waxy, sturdy nature of the blooms. 

Maggi

Meant to say - don't they remind you of Rick R's. 'little shop of horrors' plant  in his avatar ? ;) ;D

"Scottie" says long time no see, T00lie- hopes you are well and looking forward to a great summer.

M

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

The first leaves on Fritillaria davidii are well underway now. Hoping for flowers in this pot this coming spring. ;D

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hello Ron (Longma), welcome to NARGS Forum.  I really like the net-textured leaves of this species, have admired beautiful pots of them on SRGC and elsewhere, it's on my list of frits to try.

By the way, please excuse the delay in processing NARGS Forum registration requests, Thursday was Thanksgiving Day holiday here in the US, with family visiting, and then I'm still needing to work overtime in preparation for a major convention next week.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

McDonough wrote:

Hello Ron (Longma), welcome to NARGS Forum.  I really like the net-textured leaves of this species, have admired beautiful pots of them on SRGC and elsewhere, it's on my list of frits to try.

By the way, please excuse the delay in processing NARGS Forum registration requests, Thursday was Thanksgiving Day holiday here in the US, with family visiting, and then I'm still needing to work overtime in preparation for a major convention next week.

Thanks very much Mark.
It is a most unusual Fritillaria, but not very difficult to grow ( flowering it is another thing! ). It has roots almost all year round and needs to be kept  moist to very moist, in an open free draining 'woodsy' style mix. I have a number in pots and they are outside spring, summer, fall then into a shaded greenhouse for winter when I keep them on the drier side, until flowering ( hopefully!) in spring. Is it allowed to send 'rice grains' to USA? If so let me know in spring if you'd like me to send some in summer.
I completely forgot  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: that Thursday was Thanksgiving Day holiday. I hope you and all Forum members had a wonderful holiday.   I am very pleased to be here now, am looking forward to learning, and hope I can contribute in some way.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Arne
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-10

While waiting for a new comprehensive fritillaria book  :( I found a series of these on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fritillaria-Falcata-Jesse-Russell/dp/551224969X/...

Do anyone have any experience with these. Can you find the same articles searching the Web?

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