Fritillaria 2012

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Some of my white F meleagris have a tendency to reflex their petals. I'll try to take picture of one.
Here are the common types and a double (with two double flowers to the stem) that popped up in my garden.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Here's one of the hite ones. The flower is more open and reflexed than the red ones. And they flower about a week later too!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Another entry regarding Fritillaria camschatcensis.  These are grown from my own seed produced by plants given to me from the upper panhandle of Alaska.   To make a long story short, they were accidentally fertilized with a concentrated fertilizer, and after repeated drenches of clear water and a few days, it was clear they were still not at all happy.  I unpotted them, rinsed them off and potted them up again in a fresh medium.  Certainly not a good way to grow them, but it did offer me a chance to examine the bulbs.  So continues my fascination with plant anatomy...

             

I have to say, these have gone through a lot of abuse in their life... they are already five years old!  From the original seedling pot being misplaced, to being completely overun by liverworts, with a couple dozen plants plants in a four inch pot for four years, I think they have done pretty well.  In the fall of 2010 these (and four others) were transplanted into a 3.5 x 3.5 x 5 inch deep pot.  They certainly responded well after that.  Clearly, one can see the strong delineation of the larger scales, verses the smaller scales that were produced earlier.  

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, given what those plants had to endure, they look totally healthy, surprising to see so many bulblets (is that the right term with Frits?).  Thanks for taking the time and effort to show so clearly what the plants are up to underground; most educational.  

Just yesterday I dug up Arisaema amurense 'Jagged Edge' (dwarf form found and named by Darrell Probst) that was being swamped by an Epimedium, there were lots of new tubers so it is spreading nicely (albeit unnoticed, under the exuberant epimedium foliage), and I thought I should take some photos of my replanting effort, but with muddy hands, swatting at mosquitos, and daylight waning, I stayed on task and finished my replanting without photos.

Shown is the slow growing Fritillaria unibracteata, one of the few correctly labeled items obtained in my one and only order to Chen Yi nine years ago.  It has finally made a few offsets, and this spring I moved one plant to my woodland & Epimedium bed, where it is setting a nice fat pod (although it feels empty to the touch).  

Ps: Trond, I like the flared white F. meleagris, an elegant flower.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

Rick, given what those plants had to endure, they look totally healthy, surprising to see so many bulblets (is that the right term with Frits?).

The number of scales (at least that's what they are called with lilies) didn't surprise me too much, as I had seen the poor things in earlier years when I remove a layer of liverworts from a former pot, and the bulbs were then exposed.  It seems F. camschatcensis, as a species, normally has more than other (most?) frits, too.

McDonough wrote:

Thanks for taking the trime and effort to show so clearly what the plants are up to underground; most educational. 

Bulbs are beautiful things, too!
http://allthingsplants.com/thread/view/4020/Species-Lily-Bulbs/?offset=0

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, I finally have flowers on F. camschatcensis, after years and years of seeing one leaf!
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori, you are still luckier than me ;)

Here it is the other way: I buy a nice bulb and it may flowers the first season if the slugs don't find it but then it is doomed and diminishes each year . . . . . .

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The conversation regarding allthingsplants.com and the photo gallery has been moved here:  :)
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=1098.0

-- moderator

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

bulborum
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Hoy wrote:

I fully agree! And if you get enough seed . . . . .

Hello Hoy

there aren't plenty seeds
but I can send you some seeds
just PM your address

Roland

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/518187888211511
Normal Zone <8   -7°C _ -12°C      10 F to +20 F
RGB or RBGG means: Roland and Gemma de Boer

Toole
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Taken this afternoon --Frit aurea.
Yummy  :P

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

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