Fritillaria 2012

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Dave, that one is a beauty, a species I've always wanted to grow.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Me too. And I have tried :-\

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Hoy wrote:

Me too. And I have tried :-\

McDonough wrote:

Dave, that one is a beauty, a species I've always wanted to grow.

Thanks guys
I've not found it easy --lost a few over the years to rot..

On the other hand this one is far more accommodating --shot today of Fritillaria kotschyana in a pot --i have it also in a couple of troughs where it increases well.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Maybe I should try this one! Don't need a ladder to look at the flower, anyway ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Dave, that Fritillaria kotschyana is a charmer!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Hoy wrote:

Maybe I should try this one! Don't need a ladder to look at the flower, anyway ;)

Hoy ---up until a couple days ago the pot was on top of our water tank ,(currently the sunniest spot in the property),..... and that situation required a step ladder .... ;D ;D  

McDonough wrote:

Dave, that Fritillaria kotschyana is a charmer!

Hopefully i'll have time the next day or two Mark to take a pic of it showing the flowering further on ,with petals divided from each other and the tips curved outwards.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Toole wrote:

Hoy ---up until a couple days ago the pot was on top of our water tank ,(currently the sunniest spot in the property),..... and that situation required a step ladder .... ;D ;D  

Cheers Dave.

Dave, I remember that photo you posted (many months ago) showing the plants aloft.  When a gardener (also from down under, by coincidence) on another forum complained he had no room left and had to move pots just to get to others, I showed him that pic! ;D

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

RickR wrote:

Toole wrote:

Hoy ---up until a couple days ago the pot was on top of our water tank ,(currently the sunniest spot in the property),..... and that situation required a step ladder .... ;D ;D  

Cheers Dave.

Dave, I remember that photo you posted (many months ago) showing the plants aloft.  When a gardener (also from down under, by coincidence) on another forum complained he had no room left and had to move pots just to get to others, I showed him that pic! ;D

:D :D

Here's Frit Kostchyana at full flowering --pic taken yesterday on a cloudy dull day.

Cheers Dave

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Toole wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Maybe I should try this one! Don't need a ladder to look at the flower, anyway ;)

Hoy ---up until a couple days ago the pot was on top of our water tank ,(currently the sunniest spot in the property),..... and that situation required a step ladder .... ;D ;D 

Cheers Dave.

Well, I hadn't thought of that possibility  ;D (In fact I was thinking of Rick's tall plant)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It's been Fritillaria seed  planting time for me, and the deed is all done.  Yesterday I also finished repotting fritillaria seedlings.  I would have waited another year, but I was afraid the soil mix was too heavy, and they were suffering because of it.  So I am trying an new media, Fafard 52 mix that is much more airy, as the base for my ammended soil. Once again, you all get to trudge through with me in my fascination with underground structures.  At this stage, the different species look a lot alike, especially in the photographs.

The same batches of Fritillaria seed, at least for me, have more of a habit of sprouting multiple years than most other genera.  Sometimes one year can make a big difference:
Fritillaria pallidiflora - 2 & 3 year seedlings.
             

Sometimes a little difference:
F. pyrenaica - 1 & 2 year, F. carica - 1 & 2 year, F. pallidiflora - 1 & 2 year.
       
             

Some not much difference:
F. collina - 1 & 2 year seedlings.
             

The smallest ones, F. montana.  Had I been more observant, I wouldn't have repotted these, being only one season old, but in my haste it just...  happened.
             

A representative Fritillaria camschatcensis.  This one likes the moisture retentive soils and is treated differently.
             

You can see some fragile new roots on some bulbs.  I suspect they would be more robust in the right soil mix, and it probably would have been better if I repotted earlier, before they emerged.  Roots on the F. camschatcensis, however, seemed to not be in a yearly growth and death cycle.  They seem quite perennial.  Are there other Frits that do this?  

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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