Arisaema 2012

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks, Mark! I did take a look and the most similar one I found is Arisaema elephas although the "proboscis" isn't quite the same form. The leaves are very similar though.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Saori
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Joined: 2010-10-10

bulborum wrote:

Saori wrote:

Roland, I love your 'Green Devil'! Did this selection come from your regular ringens seeds?

It was just a fantasy name for the jury to get my merite

it was from seed from a few wild collected bulbs
There is also a nice black stemmed one
probably I call that one Black devil for the jury ;D
maybe I can make a good picture this spring
one of the dark ones is on the back-ground

Roland

Roland, it's fun to see lots of variations! Please post pictures of your 'Devil' series when you get flowers.

McDonough wrote:

Saori, what a slender and delicate beauty that A. triphyllum is!  I find it fascinating that this species can vary so much.  A favorite spring passtime is walking around the garden, seeing the "jacks" here and there, invariably I "lift the hood" on each spathe I find, to see what the inside color and markings might be.  The soft all green ones are refreshing too.

Thanks Mark! My green one is still small and is not producing seeds yet, but hopefully I will get a bunch of seed soon and will be able to grow lots of variations of this species!

From the beautiful Pacific Northwest, USA,
where summer is mild and dry but winter is dark and very wet... USDA Zone 7b or 8 (depends on the year)

 

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, the dark Arisaemas of yours are stunning!
Here is one I hope will grow stronger the next years. It has survived the last cold winters! A. candidissimum (sorry - a bad picture!)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Not sure why, but I've never grown A. candidissimum, yours is a nice clean white form. Maybe because purchasing bulbs is expensive, and I have gotten seed of this one yet.

From google images, I see that it can be quite a good pink as well, wonder why most Arisaema have such dark lurid-color blooms (not that there's anything wrong with that, I think I'm in good company of aroid fans intrigued by the dark somber colors, often dramatically striped).  For most aroids this has to do with pollinators, maybe I should wonder the opposite, why so few are light and brightly colored. From NARGS Seed Exchange, I did get A. flavum ssp. abbreviatum, one of the few yellows.

https://www.google.com/search?q=arisaema+candidissimum&hl=en&prmd=imvns&source=lnms&tbm=isch&ei=ay44T4CHFoTO2AWWjOD5AQ&sa=X&oi=mode_link&ct=mode&cd=2&sqi=2&ved=0CCAQ_AUoAQ&biw=1340&bih=560

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

With the extra warm temperatures this spring, Arisaema sikokianum is growing lustily this year.  This is a threesome grouping, which always faces away from the prime garden viewing direction.  Some visual impressions, the first two photos with different lighting, when backlit, the veining shows better.

Side profile, and a wider garden view:

A young self-sown plant blooming for the first time, close to Epimedium fargesii.  Notice another seedling to the right.  The darn thing has its back to the gardebn access path, as usual!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Several views of one of my favorites, a garden hybrid that appeared about 10 years ago, between the slender A. tashiroi (with beautiful snake-skin like markings on the sheathed sprout) and the common A. amurense. A few years ago I eventually lost tashiroi, but the hybrids and several forms of amurense persist.

Inside, the flowers can be green (with whitsh striping) or tinged with brown.  This is one that's growing up through an Epimedium, the spathe brownish inside.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

With the extra warm temperatures this spring, Arisaema sikokianum is growing lustily this year.  This is a threesome grouping, which always faces away from the prime garden viewing direction.  Some visual impressions, the first two photos with different lighting, when backlit, the veining shows better.

Still my all time favourite, Mark. How old is that group? Over here this species doesn't get very old, 5-6 years in the garden!
Last week I saw for the first time ever (in the garden of a friend) an A. sikokianum which propagates vegetatively, it grows small side-bulbs! That would mean getting group of this plant and never losing it again...I've asked him to put me on the waiting list for this clone  ;)

McDonough wrote:

Several views of one of my favorites, a garden hybrid that appeared about 10 years ago, between the slender A. tashiroi (with beautiful snake-skin like markings on the sheathed sprout) and the common A. amurense. A few years ago I eventually lost tashiroi, but the hybrids and several forms of amurense persist.

Inside, the flowers can be green (with whitsh striping) or tinged with brown.  This is one that's growing up through an Epimedium, the spathe brownish inside.

Wonderful hybrid, Mark. Is it fertile?
A. amurense is one of the easiest over here, and can form very big clumps, very quickly! Never tried A. tashiroi!

The first one to flower over here this year is Arisaema griffithii

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Zonedenial
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Trond; your arisaema #3 looks like my A. costatum:

Don Bolin  Zone 5a in eastern Iowa, USA (corn country).

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wim, oh no, my A. sikokianum clump-of-three is 6-7 years old, I hope that doesn't mean my clump will die soon!  I've had any number of Arisaema die, but I usually attribute the losses due to vole/mole tunneling which is a significant problem here.  Typically I scratch in the seed of A. sikokianum in various spots in the garden in late fall, and they come up here and there; can never have enough of this one.

Yes, the A. tashiroi x amurense (or is it the other way round), is indeed fertile.  For more on this hybrid, and the delightful A. tashiroi which I have fond memories of, see this past NARGS topic:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=191.msg1471#msg1471

Always wanted A. griffithii is one of the most distinctive and remarkable species, definitely on my want list, haven't tried it yet.

Don:  ooh, I really like A. costatum, a rather bright red-toned base and dramatic striping.  Did you grow yours from seed?  How long have you had it in the garden?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Zonedenial
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Joined: 2012-04-11

I obtained costatum as a small tuber; I've had it in the garden for about seven years. It blooms reliably now, but hasn't multiplied.

Don Bolin  Zone 5a in eastern Iowa, USA (corn country).

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