Arisaema 2012

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Arisaema 2012

I was sowing some Arisaema from the Chris Chadwell seed share from Little Tibet, and it inspired me to start this topic. I'll start by posting some Arisaema photos from spring 2011.

I have several good purple-stemmed forms of the common Arisaema triphyllum (Jack-in-the-Pulpit). This species is so variable, that one can save some $$$ and enjoy the many variant forms of A. triphyllum, without the need to pay great sums for Asian Arisaema species (of course, the Asian species are remarkable too). Arisaema also show promiscuity in the garden also hybridize readily, so I start out with one such garden hybrid.

The following 4 photos show a self-sown plant with big bold leaves, obviously of the A. triphyllum type. The flowers are green on the outside, dark brownish and white striped inside.

A. triphyllum hybrid?

A. triphyllum hybrid? Views showing the mottled stems that are characteristic for some Asian species I grow.

The following two photos show A. amurense x tashiroi, a cross that occurred in my garden, producing robust plants intermediate to both species, robust bold growth from amurense, but with more leaflets showing the tashiroi influence, and striking mottled stems and leaf-sheaths, also from tashiroi.

The next 4 photos show two of the darkest purple-stemmed forms of A. triphyllum I have. The original plants came from my parent's property years ago, where the "jacks" occurred in all sorts of colors, from all green to near black, solid color to light - boldly striped, and everything inbetween. I don't pay much attention to the many named subspecies or varieties of A. triphyllum after seeing such wide variability in single populations. These plants seed around in the garden, with seedling variability continuing; I favor the darker flowered ones, and forms that show color on the outside of the hooded blooms, and ones with colored stems.

A. triphyllum, purple-stemmed form, clumping up nicely, lots of babies around the parent plant.

Yet another purple-stemmed A. triphyllum form, robust and with showy jacks.

bulborum
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Joined: 2011-02-01

One of my favourites
completely dormant in the moment
so a picture from last summer
from this fantastic Arisaema kiushianum

Roland

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/518187888211511
Normal Zone <8   -7°C _ -12°C      10 F to +20 F
RGB or RBGG means: Roland and Gemma de Boer

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Mark, I love the dark A. triphyllums. They are stunning!!

Roland, A. kiushianum is one of my favorites too. I received a few bulbils of this species from a friend last year, so I hope to have some flowering in a couple of years!

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Me three, A. kiusianum is one cute little urchin, looks just like an owl face. I grew this briefly and several other Japanese species decades ago while living in the Seattle Washington area, must try it again here in New England.

Wim, I should save seed from the purple-stemmed A. triphyllum forms; they're usually set so late when the fall weather is getting cold that it's easy to forget about them.  If I find the partially shattered seed stalks, I generally try to scratch them in the soil nearby.

In my post above, I mention the hybrid that occured in my garden between A. amurense x A. tashiroi, here's a link to a number of photos on this forum from 2010.  Sadly, after growing A. tashiroi here for about 7 years, it did not show in 2011; must try to get this one back again.
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=191.msg1472#msg1472

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I'm fortunate to have received a most distinctive small form of Ariseama amurense collected in Korea by Darrell Probst.  It has the name "Jagged Edge"; not sure if that's a formally assigned name of just a nickname for this small-growing jack with jagged-edged oak-like leaves and charming light green flowers shading to a white base and faint white stripes.  In the first photo you can spot a couple Arisaema seedlings, but with sikokianum and triphyllum around nearby, who knows what they'll turn out to be; the anticipation is the best part!

Ariseama amurense "Jagged Edge"

In this photo we find an Arisaema triphyllum flower peeking just above a threesome of Trillium foetidissimum.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

Sadly, after growing A. tashiroi here for about 7 years, it did not show in 2011; must try to get this one back again.

That has happened twice for me with Arisaema fanchetianum.  Probably because it is growing in soil too heavy to its liking, I think, and the older bulb rots.  To my fortune, though, small plants have always appeared from offsets.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

bulborum
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One of my other favourites
and first price winner last year in Paris
Arisaema ringens
and a green form Arisaema ringens Green Devil

Roland

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/518187888211511
Normal Zone <8   -7°C _ -12°C      10 F to +20 F
RGB or RBGG means: Roland and Gemma de Boer

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Roland, another of my favorites, A. ringens.  Didn't know there were cultivar names; they go around here among local chapter NARGS members simply as the green form or black rimmed form.  I have one bulb that has never increased in years, the green flowered form.  It didn't flower this year, probably from downsizing or sulking after the terrible summer-autumn drought of 2010.  Really must get the black-rimmed form sometime.

Rick, my experience with Arisaema franchetianum is somewhat similar to yours.  It has never flowered, has shown a few giant rounded leaves some years, might disappear for a year, and emerge another year with but one very large rounded leaf; sometimes (such as summer 2011) not sprouting until July or August after I have long since given the plant up for dead.  I have no idea about what it wants, and its sporadic disappearance/reappearance baffles me.

Going through the Arisaema 2010 topic, I am reminded of another loss, the white-veined leaf version of A. triphyllum, a really special form.  I believe this one too, was victim of the terrible drought of 2010.  Here's the link to that topic, last 3 photos out of 10 show the white-veined leaf Arisaema triphyllum. :(
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=191.0

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Went browsing through my digital images to find some of Arisaema ringens growing at the U.S. National Arboretum, where they grew into an impressive stand.  It's hard to tell from the photographs, but these were the black-rimmed flowered form. The leaves were shiny and ENORMOUS.  Also found a couple photos of my relatively puny green-flowered form, all from May 2004.

A. ringens at U.S. National Arboretum:

Puny A. ringens by comparison to the USNA plants, flowering in my garden May 2004, the plant now smaller than ever, if indeed it is still alive:

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

bulborum
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Joined: 2011-02-01

Arisaema ringens Green Devil is a selection from myself
The jury in Paris gave the name
without name no price

The same for Cyclamen hederifolium Purple ear strain
again one of my own selections out of the Rosenteppich strain
The jury member Hans Simon gave that one a name for the same reason

Roland

Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/518187888211511
Normal Zone <8   -7°C _ -12°C      10 F to +20 F
RGB or RBGG means: Roland and Gemma de Boer

AmyO
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06

Here is one photo of A. ringens I took last year at Nick Nikous' garden. It is a huge patch and as you can see was flowering profusely!
I also added a photo from their garden of an Arum, is it Sauromattum venosum?

Amy Olmsted
Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

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