Bartsia alpina

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cohan
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I remember Lori mentioning the Townsendia connection before.. I should look again at my Castilleja photos (local) I don't recall asters being prominent there, though you can't go far here without seeing some; Here they are in grassy areas with very mixed forbs and some woodies-- who knows what they are actually attaching to? (actually, I bet someone has studied it..lol)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

I remember Lori mentioning the Townsendia connection before.. I should look again at my Castilleja photos (local) I don't recall asters being prominent there, though you can't go far here without seeing some; Here they are in grassy areas with very mixed forbs and some woodies-- who knows what they are actually attaching to? (actually, I bet someone has studied it..lol)

You bet!

I found this:  www.viscum.dk/abstracts/text/snylteplanter.pdf It is in Danish and is as easy to read as Norwegian ;)

Bartsia parasites sedges and Pinguicula + other dicots.

Pedicularis: Salix and Betula but probably also on its own root.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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There was just some discussion of Castilleja germination on Alpine-L,  and it was said that Castilleja in fact does not need a host at all- gently rub off outer seed coat, cold stratify and that's it... Bob (penstemon) mentioned no host needed in the garden, though it helps (Jane Hendrix mentioned it is more an issue of adequate water).. they are both on this forum too, maybe they'll see this and comment...

I do notice with local Castilleja and Pedicularis that some plants are much more reddish in the foliage than others, and recall a suggestion somewhere that this relates to whether they have a host or not.. they do not ever grow alone here, nothing does, but maybe they are sometimes better connected than others..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tim Ingram
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Joined: 2011-04-27

Paul Cumbleton at Wisley has had very good success cultivating Castilleja, and has written about this in The Plantsman (Vol. 7, p218). He finds that essentially careful attention to watering and regular feeding can substitute for any hosts. However, this is in pots and not in the garden. I would be fascinated to hear more of Stephanie Ferguson's experiences.

David and Stella Rankin (Kevock Plants) in Edinburgh have also grown both Castilleja and Pedicularis but I'm not sure they have succeeded in flowering the latter. (My own feeble attempts have been limited to Yellow Rattle - Rhinanthus - in the lawn!).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
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Someone in Alpine-L has also mentioned the fertilising Castilleja to substitute a host, specifically a high nitrogen fertiliser, I think they mentioned doing it in garden beds as well...
I wonder, if planted as host-less seedlings in a bed with potential hosts, can they still attach, or does it need to be done at seed emergence stage?

Tim, what and how have you done with the Rhinanthus? We have some occasional plants locally, and I plan to sow some, I quite like them.. i think they are annual/biennial?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Anonymous
Title: Guest

cohan wrote:

Tim, what and how have you done with the Rhinanthus? We have some occasional plants locally, and I plan to sow some, I quite like them.. i think they are annual/biennial?

I have never tried to grow them.  However, I did run into a patch at a preserve in Vermont.  I thought people might like to see the photo I took.

James

Mark McD
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Joined: 2009-12-14

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
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Ours looks a little different than James' image ( I see a number of species have been lumped into minor, so some variations are expected)- or maybe its a different stage- these are rather late and mostly finished flowering.. the second shot shows the habitat- growing with clovers, grasses, willows, etc, along both sides of a road, wet/wettish pastures on both sides.. alll this woody material was removed in the following winter; I'm sure I photographed the colony the next year again, but have not found the album!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

James wrote:

cohan wrote:

Tim, what and how have you done with the Rhinanthus? We have some occasional plants locally, and I plan to sow some, I quite like them.. i think they are annual/biennial?

I have never tried to grow them.  However, I did run into a patch at a preserve in Vermont.  I thought people might like to see the photo I took.

James

It is about 45 species of Rhinanthus in Eurasia. All are annuals and hemiparasitic root-parasites that make many secondary haustoria to a lot of host plants. I have R. minor at my mountain cabin. I have several times "helped" them to new areas by sowing seed. Seems to work well enough. I have also tried sowing Pedicularis in situ but they are slower to establish and I am not sure I have succeeded yet.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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I'm always amazed that any plant can be an annual in my insanely short season-- well, the season is a few months, I guess, as long as the plants can take some frost for all but the middle of it!! I remain sceptical whether all the 'annuals' here really do all their work in one year, or get a head start the year before ( I know some do one or the other or both...)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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