Bartsia alpina

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Boland
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Bartsia alpina

The rest of the North Americans here will not see this one in your native area...it is primarily European but makes it into northern Newfoundland. Trond is probably familiar with it. The foliage is quite sticky. It is hemi-parasitic like Castilleja so challenging in cultivation, not that I've tried to grow it.

Lori S.
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Joined: 2009-10-27

It's very attractive, with the flower colour echoed on the leaf edges.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Great colour on this ..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Todd wrote:

The rest of the North Americans here will not see this one in your native area...it is primarily European but makes it into northern Newfoundland.  Trond is probably familiar with it.  The foliage is quite sticky.  It is hemi-parasitic like Castilleja so challenging in cultivation, not that I've tried to grow it.

You bet! This is one of the commoner plants in the alpine meadows and Salix shrubbery in the mountains here. However, it is always nice to see them as they add some colour to the greenery.
I have never tried to grow it either.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Trond, yours appear a little taller than ours but then, ours grow in open, exposed areas which no doubt stunts them to a degree.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

cohan
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Hoy wrote:

Todd wrote:

The rest of the North Americans here will not see this one in your native area...it is primarily European but makes it into northern Newfoundland.  Trond is probably familiar with it.  The foliage is quite sticky.  It is hemi-parasitic like Castilleja so challenging in cultivation, not that I've tried to grow it.

You bet! This is one of the commoner plants in the alpine meadows and Salix shrubbery in the mountains here. However, it is always nice to see them as they add some colour to the greenery.
I have never tried to grow it either.

This is one I'd be happy to try :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Todd wrote:

Trond, yours appear a little taller than ours but then, ours grow in open, exposed areas which no doubt stunts them to a degree.

Todd, in my opinion it is opposite: Your specimens appear more compact!

cohan wrote:

This is one I'd be happy to try :)

Cohan, that shouldn't be too difficult to meet! I'll look for seed in the summer ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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It does parasitize other plants...apparently it can attach to a wide variety of plants but there is a preference for the Cyperaceae and Liliaceae.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

cohan
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Thanks, Trond :)
We have a lot of native Cyperaceae, some very nice ones; I've been meaning to do garden experiments with them, and was thinking to use them for germinating Castilleja, Pedicularis etc...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Boland
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I was told by Stephanie Ferguson, who grows spectacular Castilleja, that it is berst to partner them with an Asteraceae, especially Erigeron.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Correct my increasingly poor memory if necessary, Todd, but was she not using a lot of Townsendia for that too?  Wasn't there also a pairing of Gentiana with something else too?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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